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1.
Shock ; 55(1): 1-4, 2021 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402755
3.
J Surg Res ; 261: 39-42, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1009706

ABSTRACT

The Center for Basic and Translational Science was formed to address the unique challenges faced by surgeon-scientists. Shortly after its inception, COVID-19 upended research workflows at our institution. We discuss how the collaborative Center for Basic and Translational Science framework was adapted to support laboratories during the pandemic by assisting with ramp-down, promoting mentorship and community building, and maintaining research productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Intersectoral Collaboration , Research Personnel/organization & administration , Surgeons/organization & administration , /organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Efficiency , Humans , Mentors , Michigan/epidemiology , Pandemics
4.
Med Teach ; 43(10): 1127-1133, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944053

ABSTRACT

The use of telemedicine in clinical care has grown significantly in the last few years and has only increased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Given that many physicians will be expected to deliver virtual care moving forward, it is important for medical students to gain exposure via this modality during their clinical training. Many medical schools are actively working to integrate students into telemedicine. This article aims to provide guidance for readers incorporating medical students in telemedicine visits at an institutional or departmental level. This article covers essential topics such as coordinating key stakeholders, conducting needs assessments, addressing technological or software considerations, and creating appropriate workflows for students and physicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical, Undergraduate , Students, Medical , Telemedicine , Curriculum , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Surg Res ; 260: 300-306, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-922084

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has mandated rapid adoption of telehealth for surgical care. However, many surgical providers may be unfamiliar with telehealth. This study evaluates the perspectives of surgical providers practicing telehealth care during COVID-19 to help identify targets for surgical telehealth optimization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: At a single tertiary care center with telehealth capabilities, all department of surgery providers (attending surgeons, residents, fellows, and advanced practice providers) were emailed a voluntary survey focused on telehealth during the pandemic. Descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney U analyses were performed as appropriate on responses. Text responses were thematically coded to identify key concepts. RESULTS: The completion rate was 41.3% (145/351). Providers reported increased telehealth usage relative to the pandemic (P < 0.001). Of respondents, 80% (116/145) had no formal telehealth training. Providers estimated that new patient video visits required less time than traditional visits (P = 0.001). Satisfaction was high for several aspects of video visits. Comparatively lower satisfaction scores were reported for the ability to perform physical exams (sensitive and nonsensitive) and to break bad news. The largest barriers to effective video visits were limited physical exams (55.6%; 45/81) and lack of provider or patient internet access/equipment/connection (34.6%; 28/81). Other barriers included ineffective communication and difficulty with fostering rapport. Concerns regarding video-to-telephone visit conversion were loss of physical exam/visual cues (34.3%; 24/70), less personal interactions (18.6%; 13/70), and reduced efficiency (18.6%; 13/70). CONCLUSIONS: Telehealth remains a new experience for surgical providers despite its expansion. Optimization strategies should target technology barriers and include specialized virtual exam and communication training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Surgeons/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Videoconferencing/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Communication , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Satisfaction , Physical Distancing , Physician-Patient Relations , Quality Improvement , Surgeons/psychology , Surgery Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surgery Department, Hospital/trends , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/trends , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Videoconferencing/statistics & numerical data , Videoconferencing/trends
6.
N Engl J Med ; 383(20): 1907-1919, 2020 11 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-920642

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antibiotic therapy has been proposed as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of appendicitis. METHODS: We conducted a pragmatic, nonblinded, noninferiority, randomized trial comparing antibiotic therapy (10-day course) with appendectomy in patients with appendicitis at 25 U.S. centers. The primary outcome was 30-day health status, as assessed with the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) questionnaire (scores range from 0 to 1, with higher scores indicating better health status; noninferiority margin, 0.05 points). Secondary outcomes included appendectomy in the antibiotics group and complications through 90 days; analyses were prespecified in subgroups defined according to the presence or absence of an appendicolith. RESULTS: In total, 1552 adults (414 with an appendicolith) underwent randomization; 776 were assigned to receive antibiotics (47% of whom were not hospitalized for the index treatment) and 776 to undergo appendectomy (96% of whom underwent a laparoscopic procedure). Antibiotics were noninferior to appendectomy on the basis of 30-day EQ-5D scores (mean difference, 0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.001 to 0.03). In the antibiotics group, 29% had undergone appendectomy by 90 days, including 41% of those with an appendicolith and 25% of those without an appendicolith. Complications were more common in the antibiotics group than in the appendectomy group (8.1 vs. 3.5 per 100 participants; rate ratio, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.30 to 3.98); the higher rate in the antibiotics group could be attributed to those with an appendicolith (20.2 vs. 3.6 per 100 participants; rate ratio, 5.69; 95% CI, 2.11 to 15.38) and not to those without an appendicolith (3.7 vs. 3.5 per 100 participants; rate ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.45 to 2.43). The rate of serious adverse events was 4.0 per 100 participants in the antibiotics group and 3.0 per 100 participants in the appendectomy group (rate ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 0.67 to 2.50). CONCLUSIONS: For the treatment of appendicitis, antibiotics were noninferior to appendectomy on the basis of results of a standard health-status measure. In the antibiotics group, nearly 3 in 10 participants had undergone appendectomy by 90 days. Participants with an appendicolith were at a higher risk for appendectomy and for complications than those without an appendicolith. (Funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute; CODA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02800785.).


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Appendectomy , Appendicitis/drug therapy , Appendicitis/surgery , Appendix/surgery , Absenteeism , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Anti-Bacterial Agents/adverse effects , Appendectomy/statistics & numerical data , Appendicitis/complications , Appendix/pathology , Fecal Impaction , Female , Health Status , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Laparoscopy , Male , Middle Aged , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Outcome
7.
J Med Educ Curric Dev ; 7: 2382120520940659, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-676373

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has put those who oversee medical education in a challenging position. Medical school administrators, students, and national governing bodies have been forced to make difficult decision as a result of public health concerns and government-enforced restrictions. We, as rising fourth-year medical students, would like to shed light upon the hard work that many of those in leadership positions have done as well as lay out some concerns that medical students who are preparing to apply to residency have. Additionally, we would like to suggest several potential approaches that attempt to address some of the problems arising from the pandemic. Continuing to balance education with the hurdles presented by COVID-19 will require a multi-faceted and coordinated approach. We believe that implementing virtual rotations, delaying the opening of the application, decentralizing clinical skills evaluations, and modifying graduation requirements are possible options among many that could aid in addressing some of the current challenges presented by COVID-19.

8.
J Med Educ Curric Dev ; 7: 2382120520940666, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660186

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a significant impact on the medical community. It is suspected that the pandemic will impact the medical school application process due to effects on standardized testing, performance measures, financial burdens, and interview strategies. It is important to consider these issues early to optimize success of future strategies and mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on the application cycle.

10.
Trauma Surg Acute Care Open ; 5(1): e000481, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-216617

ABSTRACT

Prior to the covid-19 pandemic, telehealth was already being rapidly adopted nationally by healthcare systems. During the covid-19 pandemic, increased use of telehealth may be considered as a risk reduction strategy. Benefits of this strategy may be conferred to both patients and health providers.

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