Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Contemp Clin Trials ; 108: 106482, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1427719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: 20-60% of patients with initially locally advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) develop metastatic disease despite optimal surgical excision. Adjuvant strategies have been tested in RCC including cytokines, radiotherapy, hormones and oral tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKIs), with limited success. The predominant global standard-of-care after nephrectomy remains active monitoring. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are effective in the treatment of metastatic RCC; RAMPART will investigate these agents in the adjuvant setting. METHODS/DESIGN: RAMPART is an international, UK-led trial investigating the addition of ICIs after nephrectomy in patients with resected locally advanced RCC. RAMPART is a multi-arm multi-stage (MAMS) platform trial, upon which additional research questions may be addressed over time. The target population is patients with histologically proven resected locally advanced RCC (clear cell and non-clear cell histological subtypes), with no residual macroscopic disease, who are at high or intermediate risk of relapse (Leibovich score 3-11). Patients with fully resected synchronous ipsilateral adrenal metastases are included. Participants are randomly assigned (3,2:2) to Arm A - active monitoring (no placebo) for one year, Arm B - durvalumab (PD-L1 inhibitor) 4-weekly for one year; or Arm C - combination therapy with durvalumab 4-weekly for one year plus two doses of tremelimumab (CTLA-4 inhibitor) at day 1 of the first two 4-weekly cycles. The co-primary outcomes are disease-free-survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes include safety, metastasis-free survival, RCC specific survival, quality of life, and patient and clinician preferences. Tumour tissue, plasma and urine are collected for molecular analysis (TransRAMPART). TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN #: ISRCTN53348826, NCT #: NCT03288532, EUDRACT #: 2017-002329-39, CTA #: 20363/0380/001-0001, MREC #: 17/LO/1875, ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03288532, RAMPART grant number: MC_UU_12023/25, TransRAMPART grant number: A28690 Cancer Research UK, RAMPART Protocol version 5.0.


Subject(s)
Carcinoma, Renal Cell , Kidney Neoplasms , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Chronic Disease , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Quality of Life , Recurrence
2.
Eur J Cancer ; 153: 123-132, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275290

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Changes in the management of patients with cancer and delays in treatment delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic may impact the use of hospital resources and cancer mortality. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patient flows, patient pathways and use of hospital resources during the pandemic were simulated using a discrete event simulation model and patient-level data from a large French comprehensive cancer centre's discharge database, considering two scenarios of delays: massive return of patients from November 2020 (early-return) or March 2021 (late-return). Expected additional cancer deaths at 5 years and mortality rate were estimated using individual hazard ratios based on literature. RESULTS: The number of patients requiring hospital care during the simulation period was 13,000. In both scenarios, 6-8% of patients were estimated to present a delay of >2 months. The overall additional cancer deaths at 5 years were estimated at 88 in early-return and 145 in late-return scenario, with increased additional deaths estimated for sarcomas, gynaecological, liver, head and neck, breast cancer and acute leukaemia. This represents a relative additional cancer mortality rate at 5 years of 4.4 and 6.8% for patients expected in year 2020, 0.5 and 1.3% in 2021 and 0.5 and 0.5% in 2022 for each scenario, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Pandemic-related diagnostic and treatment delays in patients with cancer are expected to impact patient survival. In the perspective of recurrent pandemics or alternative events requiring an intensive use of limited hospital resources, patients should be informed not to postpone care, and medical resources for patients with cancer should be sanctuarised.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/mortality , Neoplasms/therapy , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Hospital Administration , Hospitals , Humans , Neoplasms/pathology , Pandemics , Proportional Hazards Models , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys ; 110(4): 947-956, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144733

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Patients with cancer are presumed to be more vulnerable to COVID-19. We evaluated a screening strategy combining chest computed tomography (CT) and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for patients treated with radiation therapy at our cancer center located in a COVID-19 French hotspot during the first wave of the pandemic. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chest CT images were proposed during radiation therapy CT simulation. Images were reviewed by an expert radiologist according to the COVID-19 Reporting and Data System classification. Nasal swabs with RT-PCR assay were initially proposed in cases of suspicious imaging or clinical context and were eventually integrated into the systematic screening. A dedicated radiation therapy workflow was proposed for COVID-19 patients to limit the risk of contamination. RESULTS: From March 18, 2020 to May 1, 2020, 480 patients were screened by chest CT, and 313 patients had both chest CT and RT-PCR (65%). The cumulative incidence of COVID-19 was 5.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.6-7.8; 26 of 480 patients). Diagnosis of COVID-19 was made before radiation therapy for 22 patients (84.6%) and during RT for 4 patients (15.3%). Chest CT directly aided the diagnosis of 7 cases in which the initial RT-PCR was negative or not feasible, out of a total of 480 patients (1.5%) and 517 chest CT acquisitions. Four patients with COVID-19 at the time of the chest CT screening had a false negative CT. Sensitivity and specificity of chest CT screening in patients with both RT-PCR and chest CT testing were estimated at 0.82 (95% CI, 0.60-0.95) and 0.98 (95% CI, 0.96-0.99), respectively. Adaptation of the radiation therapy treatment was made for all patients, with 7 postponed treatments (median: 5 days; interquartile range, 1.5-14.8). CONCLUSIONS: The benefit of systematic use of chest CT screening during CT simulation for patients undergoing radiation therapy during the COVID-19 pandemic seemed limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Multidetector Computed Tomography , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities , Child , Confidence Intervals , Female , France/epidemiology , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Tomography, Spiral Computed , Young Adult
5.
Cell Death Dis ; 12(3): 258, 2021 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132059

ABSTRACT

The circulating metabolome provides a snapshot of the physiological state of the organism responding to pathogenic challenges. Here we report alterations in the plasma metabolome reflecting the clinical presentation of COVID-19 patients with mild (ambulatory) diseases, moderate disease (radiologically confirmed pneumonitis, hospitalization and oxygen therapy), and critical disease (in intensive care). This analysis revealed major disease- and stage-associated shifts in the metabolome, meaning that at least 77 metabolites including amino acids, lipids, polyamines and sugars, as well as their derivatives, were altered in critical COVID-19 patient's plasma as compared to mild COVID-19 patients. Among a uniformly moderate cohort of patients who received tocilizumab, only 10 metabolites were different among individuals with a favorable evolution as compared to those who required transfer into the intensive care unit. The elevation of one single metabolite, anthranilic acid, had a poor prognostic value, correlating with the maintenance of high interleukin-10 and -18 levels. Given that products of the kynurenine pathway including anthranilic acid have immunosuppressive properties, we speculate on the therapeutic utility to inhibit the rate-limiting enzymes of this pathway including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , Metabolome , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/administration & dosage , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Metabolomics , Prognosis
8.
Nature Cancer ; 2020.
Article in English | ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-798872

ABSTRACT

Patients with cancer are presumed to be at increased risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes due to underlying malignancy and treatment-induced immunosuppression. Of the first 178 patients managed for COVID-19 at the Gustave Roussy Cancer Centre, 125 (70.2%) were hospitalized, 47 (26.4%) developed clinical worsening and 31 (17.4%) died. An age of over 70 years, smoking status, metastatic disease, cytotoxic chemotherapy and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score of ≥2 at the last visit were the strongest determinants of increased risk of death. In multivariable analysis, the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group score remained the only predictor of death. In contrast, immunotherapy, hormone therapy and targeted therapy did not increase clinical worsening or death risk. Biomarker studies found that C-reactive protein and lactate dehydrogenase levels were significantly associated with an increased risk of clinical worsening, while C-reactive protein and D-dimer levels were associated with an increased risk of death. COVID-19 management impacted the oncological treatment strategy, inducing a median 20 d delay in 41% of patients and adaptation of the therapeutic strategy in 30% of patients.

9.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 1248-1257, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-696845

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To understand readiness measures taken by oncologists to protect patients and health care workers from the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) and how their clinical decision making was influenced by the pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was conducted between March 24 and April 29, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 343 oncologists from 28 countries participated. The median age was 43 years (range, 29-68 years), and the majority were male (62%). At the time of the survey, nearly all participants self-reported an outbreak in their country (99.7%). Personal protective equipment was available to all participants, of which surgical mask was the most common (n = 308; 90%). Telemedicine, in the form of phone or video encounters, was common and implemented by 80% (n = 273). Testing patients with cancer for COVID-19 via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction before systemic treatment was not routinely implemented: 58% reported no routine testing, 39% performed testing in selected patients, and 3% performed systematic testing in all patients. The most significant factors influencing an oncologist's decision making regarding choice of systemic therapy included patient age and comorbidities (81% and 92%, respectively). Although hormonal treatments and tyrosine kinase inhibitors were considered to be relatively safe, cytotoxic chemotherapy and immune therapies were perceived as being less safe or unsafe by participants. The vast majority of participants stated that during the pandemic they would use less chemotherapy, immune checkpoint inhibitors, and steroids. Although treatment in neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and first-line metastatic disease was less affected, most of the participants stated that they would be more hesitant to recommend second- or third-line therapies in metastatic disease. CONCLUSION: Decision making by oncologists has been significantly influenced by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Clinical Decision-Making , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Male , Medical Oncology/methods , Medical Oncology/standards , Medical Oncology/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/diagnosis , Oncologists/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/standards , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...