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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-319104

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to SARS-CoV-2 respiratory failure, prone positioning of patients with respiratory and hemodynamic instability has become a frequent intervention in intensive care units (ICUs), and even in patients undergoing transfer in an ambulance or helicopter. The question becomes how to perform safe and effective CPR in prone position, achieving both an optimal outcome for the patient and optimal protection of staff from infection. Materials: and Methods: We conducted a feasibility study to assess the effects of CPR with an automatic load-distributing band (AutoPulse TM ) in prone position. Results: : In supine position, AutoPulse TM generated a constant pressure depth of 3 cm at a frequency of 84/min. In prone position, AutoPulse TM generated a constant pressure depth of 2.6 cm at a frequency of 84/min. Conclusion: We found that AutoPulse TM CPR was feasible in manikins in both prone and supine positions.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-312362

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19, the pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, is challenging healthcare systems worldwide. Little is known about problems faced by emergency medical services—particularly helicopter services—caring for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. We aimed to describe the issues faced by air ambulance services in Europe as they transport potential COVID-19 patients. Methods: Nine different HEMS providers across Europe were invited to share their experiences and to report their data regarding the care, transport, and safety measures in suspected or confirmed COVID-19 missions. Six air ambulance providers agreed and reported their data. 385 COVID-19-related missions were analysed, including 119 primary transport missions and 266 interfacility transport missions. Results: All providers had developed special procedures and safety instructions in preparation for COVID-19. Ground transport was the preferred mode of transport in primary missions, whereas air transport was preferred for interfacility transport. In some countries the transport of COVID-19 patients by regular air ambulance services was avoided. Patients in interfacility transport missions had a significantly higher median (range) NACA Score 3 (1-7) compared with 4 (2-5), needed significantly more medical interventions, were significantly younger (59.6±16 vs 65±21 years), and were significantly more often male (73% vs 60.5%). Conclusions: All participating air ambulance providers were prepared for COVID-19. Safe care and transport of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients is achievable. Most patients on primary missions were transported by ground. These patients were less sick than interfacility transport patients, for whom air transport was the preferred method.

3.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 94, 2020 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-781501

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, the pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, is challenging healthcare systems worldwide. Little is known about problems faced by emergency medical services-particularly helicopter services-caring for suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. We aimed to describe the issues faced by air ambulance services in Europe as they transport potential COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Nine different HEMS providers in seven different countries across Europe were invited to share their experiences and to report their data regarding the care, transport, and safety measures in suspected or confirmed COVID-19 missions. Six air ambulance providers in six countries agreed and reported their data regarding development of special procedures and safety instructions in preparation for the COVID-19 pandemic. Four providers agreed to provide mission related data. Three hundred eighty-five COVID-19-related missions were analysed, including 119 primary transport missions and 266 interfacility transport missions. RESULTS: All providers had developed special procedures and safety instructions in preparation for COVID-19. Ground transport was the preferred mode of transport in primary missions, whereas air transport was preferred for interfacility transport. In some countries the transport of COVID-19 patients by regular air ambulance services was avoided. Patients in interfacility transport missions had a significantly higher median (range) NACA Score 4 (2-5) compared with 3 (1-7), needed significantly more medical interventions, were significantly younger (59.6 ± 16 vs 65 ± 21 years), and were significantly more often male (73% vs 60.5%). CONCLUSIONS: All participating air ambulance providers were prepared for COVID-19. Safe care and transport of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients is achievable. Most patients on primary missions were transported by ground. These patients were less sick than interfacility transport patients, for whom air transport was the preferred method.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances/organization & administration , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Transportation of Patients/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 28(1): 40, 2020 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current COVID-19 pandemic highlights the challenges air ambulance services are facing when transporting highly infectious patients for several hours in enclosed spaces. This overview provides an example of a standard operating procedure (SOP) for infection prevention measures in HEMS missions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, we describe different methods used by several organizations in Europe and the experience of the Swiss air rescue organization Rega in transporting these patients. Possible benefits of the use of small patient isolation units (PIU) are discussed, including the fact that accompanying medical personnel do not need to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) during the transport but can still maintain full access to the patient. Rega has developed and patented its own PIU. This device allows spontaneously breathing or mechanically ventilated patients to be transported in pressurized jet cabins, small helicopters and ambulance vehicles, without the need to change between transport units. This PIU is unique, as it remains air-tight even when there is a sudden loss of cabin pressure. CONCLUSION: A wide variety of means are being used for the aeromedical transport of infectious patients. These involve isolating either the patient or the medical crew. One benefit of PIUs is that the means of transport can be easily changed without contaminating the surroundings and while still allowing access to the patient.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances/organization & administration , Air Ambulances/standards , Aircraft/standards , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Transportation of Patients/methods , Transportation of Patients/standards , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Europe , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
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