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1.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1755475

ABSTRACT

Background The concentration and duration of antibodies (Ab) to SARS-CoV-2 infection predicts the severity of the disease and the clinical outcomes. Older people and those with HIV have impaired immune responses, worse outcomes after SARS-CoV-2 infection, and lower antibody responses after viral infection and vaccination. This study evaluated an Ab response to SARS-CoV-2 in people with HIV (PWH) and without HIV (HIV-) and its association with age. Methods A total of 23 COVID+PWH and 21 COVID+HIV- participants were followed longitudinally for 6 months post-mild COVID-19. Immunoglobin G (IgG) and immunoglobin M (IgM) Ab responses were measured by an in-house developed ELISA. Time points and HIV status interaction were analyzed using Poisson generalized estimating equations, and correlations were analyzed using non-parametric tests. Results Median age in PWH was 55 years with 28.6% women, while in the HIV- group was 36 years with 60.9% women. The mean time from COVID-19 diagnosis to study enrollment was 16 days for PWH and 11 days for HIV-. The mean CD4+ T-cell count/μl for PWH was 772.10 (±365.21). SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG were detected at all time points and Ab response levels did not differ by HIV status (p > 0.05). At entry, age showed a weak direct association with IgG responses (ρ = 0.44, p < 0.05) in HIV- but did not show any association in PWH. Similar associations between age, IgG, and HIV status emerged at day 14 (T1;ρ = 0.50, p < 0.05), 3 months (T3;ρ = 0.50, p < 0.05), and 6 months visit (T4;ρ = 0.78, p < 0.05) in the HIV- group. Conclusion The Ab responses in the 6-month post-SARS-CoV-2 infection did not differ by HIV status, though a positive association was found between age and Ab response in older PWH. Results suggest that immune protection and vaccine responses are similar for PWH than for those without HIV infection.

3.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S328-S330, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1563858

ABSTRACT

Background The Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) global health crisis has resulted in an unprecedented strain on healthcare systems, reorganization of medical training programs and disruption in professional and personal lives of medical trainees. The impact of COVID-19 on infectious disease (ID) fellows, who are frontline healthcare professionals, has not been assessed. Methods We conducted a national survey of adult and pediatric ID fellows to assess impact on educational activities, availability of personal protective equipment (PPE), well-being, and career prospects. Anxiety and burnout were assessed by 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale and abbreviated Maslach burnout inventory respectively. Invitations to participate in the survey were sent via email to all ID fellows through Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) fellowship directors. Survey responses collected from August 1 to September 30, 2020 have been reported. Results 136 fellows completed the survey (Table 1). 84% reported their institution had provided evidence-based didactics for management of COVID-19 and 53% indicated their general ID didactics were affected by the pandemic. 86% of fellows were involved in care of patients with COVID-19, and 31% reported a shortage of PPE affecting their clinical duties. Those living in highly impacted states (CA, FL, NY, TX) at the time of the survey were 1.70 times as likely to experience moderate to severe anxiety (vs. minimal to moderate) than those in other states;similarly, those who saw ≥11 COVID-19 patients weekly and reported PPE shortages were 2.5 and 2.0 times as likely, respectively, to experience moderate to severe anxiety compared to their peers who took care of 10 or fewer COVID-19 patients and did not experience PPE shortages. Burnout scores were not significant (Table 2). Table 1. Demographics, Responses to Personal Exposure, Educational Activities and Career Prospects Table 2. Stress, Burnout, Anxiety , Sleep and Quality of Life Among Survey Participants. Conclusion It is imperative that ID fellows feel adequately protected and supported during this pandemic. Pandemic preparedness should be included in the ID fellowship curriculum. Interventions for anxiety and burnout reduction should be implemented. ID fellowship programs should continue to accept feedback from fellows to ensure their ongoing safety, well-being, and education as we navigate this pandemic. Disclosures All Authors: No reported disclosures

4.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 89(1): 1-8, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561815

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms among people living with HIV (PLWH) are not well described. SETTING: Longitudinal survey within the MACS/WIHS Combined Cohort Study (MWCCS) of PLWH compared with similar HIV-seronegative (SN) individuals. METHODS: Telephone-administered survey of MWCCS participants at 13 clinical research sites across the United States addressing COVID-19 symptoms, SARS-CoV-2 testing, and pandemic impact on social distancing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) use. Primary data collection occurred during May (wave 1), June-July (wave 2), and August-September, 2020 (wave 3). RESULTS: One-third of MWCCS participants were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection; 10% was tested ≥2 times. Similar proportions of PLWH and SN participants were tested, but SARS-CoV-2 positivity was higher among PLWH than among SN individuals (9.4% vs 4.8%, P = 0.003). Odds of SARS-CoV-2 positivity remained higher among PLWH after adjusting for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and study site (adjusted odds ratio = 2.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.2 to 3.2). SARS-CoV-2 positivity was not associated with CD4 cell counts among PLWH. Among SARS-CoV-2 positive participants, 9% had no symptoms, 7% had 1-2 mild symptoms, and 84% had ≥3 symptoms. Most of the (98%) participants reported physical distancing during all survey waves; self-reported ART adherence among PLWH was not adversely affected during the pandemic compared with the previous year (similar adherence in 89% of participants, improved in 9% of participants, and decreased in 2% of participants). CONCLUSIONS: Despite similar SARS-CoV-2 testing and physical distancing profiles by HIV serostatus among MWCCS participants, PLWH who reported SARS-CoV-2 testing were more likely to have a positive test result. Additional studies are needed to determine whether and why PLWH are at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Fever/etiology , HIV Infections/complications , Pharyngitis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Cough , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence
5.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(6): ofab154, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disproportionally affect underrepresented ethnoracial groups in the United States. Medical mistrust and vaccine hesitancy will likely impact acceptability of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. This study examined SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy among underrepresented ethnoracial groups with HIV and identified factors that may reduce vaccine uptake. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults ≥18 years of age with HIV residing in Miami, Florida. Participants were invited to participate in the ACTION (A Comprehensive Translational Initiative on Novel Coronavirus) cohort study. A baseline survey was administered from April to August 2020 and followed by a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine hesitancy survey from August to November 2020. The COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy survey was adapted from the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts survey. Comparisons by race and ethnicity were performed using the Freedman-Haltmann extension of the Fisher exact test. RESULTS: A total of 94 participants were enrolled; mean age was 54.4 years, 52% were female, 60% were Black non-Latinx, and 40% were non-Black Latinx. Black non-Latinx participants were less likely to agree that vaccinations are important for health when compared to non-Black Latinx (67.8% vs 92.1%, P = .009), less likely to agree that vaccines are effective in preventing disease (67.8% vs 84.2%, P = .029), less likely to believe that vaccine information is reliable and trustworthy (35.7% vs 71.1%, P = .002), and less likely to believe vaccines were unnecessary because COVID-19 would disappear soon (11% vs 21%, P = .049). CONCLUSIONS: Medical mistrust, vaccine hesitancy, and negative sentiments about SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are prevalent among underrepresented ethnoracial groups with HIV, particularly Black non-Latinx. Targeted strategies to increase vaccine uptake in this population are warranted.

6.
AIDS Behav ; 26(1): 96-101, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274860

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the psychometric properties of a modified version of the Vaccine Hesitancy Scale (VHS) among people with HIV (PWH) for COVID-19 vaccination in a cross-sectional study in the US. Self-report data from an online questionnaire were collected from a sample of N = 175 PWH. Participants were surveyed in English or Spanish regarding attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccination using the adapted VHS. Participants were on average 51.55 years of age (SD = 13.90) 55% were women. The reliability of the scale was acceptable (α = 0.72). An exploratory factor analysis showed that "Lack of confidence" and "Risks" explained 45.55% and 12.31% of the variance. Related items showed expected associations with these factors, supporting construct validity. Results illustrate that the modified VHS for COVID-19 vaccination has adequate psychometric properties. We replicated the original factor structure of the VHS and demonstrated adequate internal consistency and construct validity. Validated tools are essential to guide vaccination policy and campaigns towards populations at risk.


RESUMEN: En este estudio transversal, evaluamos las propiedades psicométricas de la Escala de Reticencia a la Vacunación (VHS, por sus siglas en inglés) para la vacuna contra el COVID-19 en personas con VIH (PCV) en los EE. UU. Los participantes (N = 175) respondieron a una encuesta en línea en inglés o en español, sobre las actitudes hacia la vacuna contra el COVID-19 utilizando una version adaptada de la VHS. La edad promedio de los participantes fue de 51,55 años (DE = 13,90;) y 55% eran mujeres. La fiabilidad de la escala fue aceptable (α = 0,72). Un análisis factorial exploratorio mostró que la "falta de confianza" y los "riesgos" explicaron el 45,55% y el 12,31% de la varianza. Los elementos relacionados mostraron asociaciones esperadas con dichos factores, apoyando la validez de la VHS adaptada para esta población. Los resultados ilustran que la VHS modificada para la vacuna contra el COVID-19 tiene propiedades psicométricas adecuadas. Replicamos la estructura factorial original de la VHS y demostramos una adecuada validez y consistencia interna. La validación de instrumentos de recolección de datos es esencial para orientar las políticas y campañas de vacunación para poblaciones en riesgo, tal como PCV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
7.
AIDS Behav ; 25(12): 4000-4007, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245665

ABSTRACT

Black women living with HIV (BWLWH) in the U.S. face microaggressions based on race, gender, HIV-status, and sexual orientation. We examined changes in daily microaggressions and related distress among 143 BWLWH in Miami, FL. Microaggression-related distress increased from 52% at baseline/October, peaked at 70% during the holidays (November/December), declined to 55% in March when COVID-19 social distancing began, and peaked to 83% in June/July 2020 during widespread Black Lives Matters protests. Baseline viral suppression was associated with lower microaggressions across the 9-months. Microaggression-related distress may change due to social context and research is needed on microaggressions and viral load overtime.


RESUMEN: Las mujeres de raza negra que viven con el VIH (MNVV) en los EE. UU. enfrentan microagresiones basadas en la raza, el género, el estado serológico del VIH y la orientación sexual. Examinamos los cambios en las microagresiones diarias y el estrés relacionado entre 143 MNVV en Miami, FL. El estrés relacionado con la microagresión aumentó del 52% en la línea de base/octubre, alcanzó un máximo del 70% durante las vacaciones (noviembre/diciembre), disminuyó al 55% en marzo cuando comenzó el distanciamiento social por el COVID-19 y alcanzó un máximo del 83% en junio/julio de 2020 durante las protestas generalizadas de Black Lives Matters. La supresión viral inicial se asoció con menores microagresiones durante los 9 meses. El estrés relacionada con la microagresión puede cambiar debido al contexto social y se necesitan investigaciones sobre las microagresiones y la carga viral con el tiempo.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Racism , Aggression , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(2): 869-874, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231054

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study evaluated COVID-19 risk and burden among people with HIV (PWH) in a US city with high rates of HIV and SARS-CoV-2 transmissions and examined the interrelationship between psychosocial factors and COVID-19 risk and burden. SETTING: Participants were drawn from an existing consent to contact database of PWH. Database candidates were PWH, adults older than 18 years, people who had received HIV care at the University of Miami HIV clinics, people who spoke English or Spanish, and people who had agreed to be contacted for future research. METHODS: An adapted version of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study/Women's Interagency HIV Study Combined Cohort Study COVID-19 survey was telephonically administered, requiring 15-30 minutes. RESULTS: Psychological stress was a predictor of COVID-19 burden (financial and social burden) and COVID-19 risk (health factors associated with an increased risk of severe health outcomes due to infection with COVID-19). Having a history of traumatic events was associated with increased COVID-19 risk, and stress was associated with increased COVID-19 burden and COVID-19 risk. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, results suggest that the intersection of the HIV and COVID-19 pandemics may be most profound among those who have experienced traumatic events; and traumatic events may be associated with heightened vigilance regarding illness and infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , HIV Infections/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Cost of Illness , Depression/complications , Female , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk , Stress, Psychological/complications
9.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 37(4): 314-321, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207219

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the psychological implications of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on people with HIV. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of COVID-19 among men and women with HIV in Miami, Florida. We hypothesized that the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic will be higher for women, and psychological factors will increase COVID-19 burden among them. People with (n = 231) and without HIV (n = 42) residing in Miami, Florida completed a survey assessing psychological outcomes such as loneliness, depression, and stress, as well as the burden of COVID-19, on their daily lives. t-Tests and chi-square analyses were used to assess sex differences in study variables. Logistic regression was used to compare the interaction effects predicting stress and loneliness by COVID-19 burden and sex. A total of 273 completed the survey; the outcomes of the study, loneliness, and stress did not differ by HIV status (p = .458 and p = .922). Overall, men and women reported similar prevalence of COVID-19 burden. However, a greater proportion of women reported losing childcare than men (18% vs. 9%, p = .029, respectively), as well as losing mental health care (15% vs. 7%, p = .049, respectively). There was a significant interaction between COVID-19 burden and sex for loneliness and stress such that the association between COVID-19 burden and loneliness was greater for women (p < .001) than for men (p = .353) and the association between COVID-19 burden and stress was greater for women (p = .013) than men (p = .628). Both men and women with HIV are impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, but women may experience higher levels of stress and loneliness than men. Sex differences may require tailored interventions to more effectively mitigate the impact of the pandemic on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Loneliness , Sex Factors , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology
10.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 37(4): 314-321, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189422

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the psychological implications of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on people with HIV. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of COVID-19 among men and women with HIV in Miami, Florida. We hypothesized that the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic will be higher for women, and psychological factors will increase COVID-19 burden among them. People with (n = 231) and without HIV (n = 42) residing in Miami, Florida completed a survey assessing psychological outcomes such as loneliness, depression, and stress, as well as the burden of COVID-19, on their daily lives. t-Tests and chi-square analyses were used to assess sex differences in study variables. Logistic regression was used to compare the interaction effects predicting stress and loneliness by COVID-19 burden and sex. A total of 273 completed the survey; the outcomes of the study, loneliness, and stress did not differ by HIV status (p = .458 and p = .922). Overall, men and women reported similar prevalence of COVID-19 burden. However, a greater proportion of women reported losing childcare than men (18% vs. 9%, p = .029, respectively), as well as losing mental health care (15% vs. 7%, p = .049, respectively). There was a significant interaction between COVID-19 burden and sex for loneliness and stress such that the association between COVID-19 burden and loneliness was greater for women (p < .001) than for men (p = .353) and the association between COVID-19 burden and stress was greater for women (p = .013) than men (p = .628). Both men and women with HIV are impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, but women may experience higher levels of stress and loneliness than men. Sex differences may require tailored interventions to more effectively mitigate the impact of the pandemic on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Loneliness , Sex Factors , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology
11.
J AIDS HIV Treat ; 2(2): 68-74, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145765

ABSTRACT

Persons living with HIV-1 (PLHIV) are at increased risk of cardiovascular complications in part due to the persistent inflammatory state despite viral suppression. SARS-CoV-2, the virus causing COVID-19, was declared a pandemic virus in March 2020, and caused over 30 million cases and 900,000 deaths worldwide to date. Individuals with COVID-19 are manifesting acute cardiovascular complications because of the inflammatory response associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. It is not yet known whether having COVID-19 in the context of ongoing HIV-1 infection results in worse cardiovascular complications than in PLHIV who have not had COVID-19 infection. In this review, the potential for exacerbated cardiovascular manifestations in persons coinfected with HIV-1 and COVID-19 is considered.

12.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 37(4): 314-321, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1101804

ABSTRACT

Little is known about the psychological implications of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on people with HIV. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of COVID-19 among men and women with HIV in Miami, Florida. We hypothesized that the burden of the COVID-19 pandemic will be higher for women, and psychological factors will increase COVID-19 burden among them. People with (n = 231) and without HIV (n = 42) residing in Miami, Florida completed a survey assessing psychological outcomes such as loneliness, depression, and stress, as well as the burden of COVID-19, on their daily lives. t-Tests and chi-square analyses were used to assess sex differences in study variables. Logistic regression was used to compare the interaction effects predicting stress and loneliness by COVID-19 burden and sex. A total of 273 completed the survey; the outcomes of the study, loneliness, and stress did not differ by HIV status (p = .458 and p = .922). Overall, men and women reported similar prevalence of COVID-19 burden. However, a greater proportion of women reported losing childcare than men (18% vs. 9%, p = .029, respectively), as well as losing mental health care (15% vs. 7%, p = .049, respectively). There was a significant interaction between COVID-19 burden and sex for loneliness and stress such that the association between COVID-19 burden and loneliness was greater for women (p < .001) than for men (p = .353) and the association between COVID-19 burden and stress was greater for women (p = .013) than men (p = .628). Both men and women with HIV are impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, but women may experience higher levels of stress and loneliness than men. Sex differences may require tailored interventions to more effectively mitigate the impact of the pandemic on mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Loneliness , Sex Factors , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , United States/epidemiology
13.
AIDS Behav ; 25(8): 2391-2399, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1100974

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a risk to mental health and may disproportionately affect people living with HIV (PLWH). This study examined the interaction of social support and resilient coping in predicting depressive symptoms among PLWH. PLWH residing in Buenos Aires, Argentina and in Miami, Florida (US) were asked to complete an anonymous survey on the impact of COVID-19. Statistical analysis included ordinary least squares regression. A total of 1,554 participants were included. Mean age was 47.30 years; 63.70% were men. A test of three-way interaction of social support × resilient coping × study site indicated differences by site (b = -0.63, p = 0.04, 95%CI [-1.24, -0.02]). In Argentina, higher levels of social support and resilient coping were associated with lower depressive symptoms. Lower levels of social support and resilient coping were associated with higher depressive symptoms. The impact of COVID-19 on mental health illustrates the need for developing innovative strategies to support resilience and to enhance coping with stress and adversity among PLWH.


RESUMEN: La pandemia de COVID-19 presenta riesgos importantes para la salud mental y puede afectar desproporcionadamente a personas con VIH. Este estudio examinó el efecto entre el apoyo social y la resiliencia para afrontar situaciones difíciles en predecir síntomas depresivos en personas con VIH. Personas con VIH residentes de Buenos Aires (Argentina) y Miami, Florida (EE.UU) completaron una encuesta anónima sobre el impacto del COVID-19. El análisis estadístico incluyó un modelo clásico de regresión lineal con mínimos cuadrados ordinarios. Se incluyeron 1554 participantes. La edad promedio fue 47.30 años y 63.7% eran hombres. La prueba de interacción de apoyo social × resiliencia para hacer frente a situaciones difíciles × país indicó diferencias entre países (b = −0.63, p = 0.043, IC 95% [1.24, −0.02]). En Argentina, los participantes con mayor apoyo social y resiliencia para hacer frente a situaciones difíciles mostraron síntomas depresivos más bajos; y aquellos con menor apoyo social y resiliencia para hacer frente a situaciones difíciles, mostraron síntomas depresivos más altos. Este efecto no se observó en los participantes de Miami. El impacto de COVID-19 en la salud mental en personas con VIH ilustra la necesidad de desarrollar estrategias innovadoras para apoyar la resiliencia y mejorar el enfrentamiento del estrés y la adversidad.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Adaptation, Psychological , Argentina/epidemiology , Florida/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support
14.
JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes ; 85(4):475-482, 2020.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1017333

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, causative agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has necessitated widespread lockdown to mitigate the pandemic. This study examines the influence of resilience on the impact of COVID-related stress and enforced lockdown on mental health, drug use, and treatment adherence among people living with HIV (PLWH) in Argentina. Setting: PLWH residing predominantly in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area and urban regions of Argentina were identified from a private clinic electronic database. Methods: Participants completed an anonymous online survey to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on economic disruption, resilience, mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety, stress, and loneliness), adherence to HIV treatment, and substance use. We performed ordinary least squares and logistic regressions to test whether resilient coping buffered the impact of economic disruption on mental health and drug use during quarantine. Results: A total of 1336 PLWH aged 18-82 were enrolled. The impact of economic disruption on mental health DF(1,1321) = 8.86, P = 0.003 and loneliness DF(1,1326) = 5.77, P = 0.016 was buffered by resilience. A 3-way interaction between resilient buffering, stress, and sex was significant DF(1,1325) = 4.76, P = 0.029. Participants reported less than excellent adherence to medication (33%), disruption to mental health services (11%), and disruption to substance abuse treatment (1.3%) during lockdown. Discussion: The impact of COVID-stress and lockdown on emotional distress seemed mitigated by resilience coping strategies, and the buffering impact of resilience on perceived stress was greater among women. Results highlight PLWH's capacity to adhere to treatment in challenging circumstances and the importance of developing resilience skills for better coping with stress and adversity. [ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes is the property of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

17.
HIV Res Clin Pract ; 21(5): 130-139, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection among People Living With HIV (PLWH) is not well-described. OBJECTIVE: To study COVID-19 symptoms and SARS-CoV-2 PCR-based swab testing among participants of the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) and Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). METHODS: A telephone survey was collected April-June 30, 2020. Symptom and testing prevalence were explored. Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 positivity. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 3411 participants, including 2078 (61%) PLWH and 1333 HIV-seronegative (SN) participants from across the US. Thirteen percent (n = 441) were tested for SARS-CoV-2 infection (13.4% of PLWH vs 12.2% of SN). Among those tested, positivity was higher in PLWH than SN (11.2% vs 6.1%, p = 0.08). Reasons for not being tested included testing not being available (30% of participants) and not knowing where to get tested (16% of participants). Most symptoms reported since January 2020 were similar in PLWH and SN, including headache (23% vs. 24%), myalgias (19% vs 18%), shortness of breath (14% vs 13%), chills (12% vs 10%), fever (6% vs 6%) and loss of taste or smell (6% vs 7%). Among PLWH who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 DNA, the most common symptoms were headache (71%), myalgia (68%), cough (68%) and chills (65%). In multivariable analysis among those tested, the odds of SARS-CoV-2 positivity were higher among PLWH than SN (aOR = 2.22 95%CI = 01.01-4.85, p = 0.046) and among those living with others versus living alone (aOR = 2.95 95%CI = 1.18-7.40). CONCLUSION: Prevalence and type of COVID-19 symptoms were similar in PLWH and SN. SARS-CoV-2 infection may be elevated among PLWH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/virology , HIV Infections/physiopathology , HIV Infections/virology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Ageusia/epidemiology , Ageusia/virology , Anosmia/epidemiology , Anosmia/virology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Chills/epidemiology , Chills/virology , Coinfection , Cough/epidemiology , Cough/virology , Dyspnea/epidemiology , Dyspnea/virology , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Fever/virology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Headache/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States/epidemiology
18.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(9): ofaa320, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-787247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2 ) is responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a disease that had not been previously described and for which clinicians need to rapidly adapt their daily practice. The novelty of SARS-CoV-2 produced significant gaps in harmonization of definitions, data collection, and outcome reporting to identify patients who would benefit from potential interventions. METHODS: We describe a multicenter collaboration to develop a comprehensive data collection tool for the evaluation and management of COVID-19 in hospitalized patients. The proposed tool was developed by a multidisciplinary working group of infectious disease physicians, intensivists, and infectious diseases/antimicrobial stewardship pharmacists. The working group regularly reviewed literature to select important patient characteristics, diagnostics, and outcomes for inclusion. The data collection tool consisted of spreadsheets developed to collect data from the electronic medical record and track the clinical course after treatments. RESULTS: Data collection focused on demographics and exposure epidemiology, prior medical history and medications, signs and symptoms, diagnostic test results, interventions, clinical outcomes, and complications. During the pilot validation phase, there was <10% missing data for most domains and components. Team members noted improved efficiency and decision making by using the tool during interdisciplinary rounds. CONCLUSIONS: We present the development of a COVID-19 data collection tool and propose its use to effectively assemble harmonized data of hospitalized individuals with COVID-19. This tool can be used by clinicians, researchers, and quality improvement healthcare teams. It has the potential to facilitate interdisciplinary rounds, provide comparisons across different hospitalized populations, and adapt to emerging challenges posed by the pandemic.

19.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(4): 475-482, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-748564

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, causative agent of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has necessitated widespread lockdown to mitigate the pandemic. This study examines the influence of resilience on the impact of COVID-related stress and enforced lockdown on mental health, drug use, and treatment adherence among people living with HIV (PLWH) in Argentina. SETTING: PLWH residing predominantly in Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area and urban regions of Argentina were identified from a private clinic electronic database. METHODS: Participants completed an anonymous online survey to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on economic disruption, resilience, mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety, stress, and loneliness), adherence to HIV treatment, and substance use. We performed ordinary least squares and logistic regressions to test whether resilient coping buffered the impact of economic disruption on mental health and drug use during quarantine. RESULTS: A total of 1336 PLWH aged 18-82 were enrolled. The impact of economic disruption on mental health ΔF(1,1321) = 8.86, P = 0.003 and loneliness ΔF(1,1326) = 5.77, P = 0.016 was buffered by resilience. A 3-way interaction between resilient buffering, stress, and sex was significant ΔF(1,1325) = 4.76, P = 0.029. Participants reported less than excellent adherence to medication (33%), disruption to mental health services (11%), and disruption to substance abuse treatment (1.3%) during lockdown. DISCUSSION: The impact of COVID-stress and lockdown on emotional distress seemed mitigated by resilience coping strategies, and the buffering impact of resilience on perceived stress was greater among women. Results highlight PLWH's capacity to adhere to treatment in challenging circumstances and the importance of developing resilience skills for better coping with stress and adversity.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , HIV Infections/psychology , Mental Health/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Argentina , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Intimate Partner Violence/trends , Least-Squares Analysis , Logistic Models , Loneliness , Male , Mental Health Services/standards , Middle Aged , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Traumatic, Acute/etiology , Substance-Related Disorders/etiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Treatment Adherence and Compliance , Young Adult
20.
IDCases ; 22: e00943, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743996

ABSTRACT

A patient with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis with a previous positive SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibody was diagnosed with severe COVID-19. Issues regarding reinfection, the potential lack of antibody protection after asymptomatic infection, the possibility of antibody dependent enhancement and careful interpretation of antibody test results are discussed.

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