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1.
Thromb Haemost ; 2021 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510665

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is still unclear if patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have different rate, typology, and impact of thrombosis on survival. METHODS: In this multicentre observational cohort study 1.138 patients, hospitalized for CAP (n=559) or COVID-19 (n=579) from 7 clinical centres in Italy, were included in the study. Consecutive adult patients (age ≥18 years) with confirmed COVID-19 related pneumonia, with or without mechanical ventilation, hospitalized from 1st March 2020 to 30 April 2020, were enrolled. Covid-19 was diagnosed based on the WHO interim guidance. Patients were followed-up until discharge or in-hospital death, registering the occurrence of thrombotic events including ischemic/embolic events. RESULTS: During the in-hospital stay, 11.4% of CAP and 15.5% of COVID-19 patients experienced thrombotic events (p=0.046). In CAP patients all the events were arterial thromboses, while in COVID-19 patients 8.3% were venous and 7.2% arterial thromboses. During the in-hospital follow-up, 3% of CAP patients and 17% of COVID-19 patients died (p<0.001). The highest mortality rate was found among COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (47.6% vs 13.4% in thrombotic-event free patients; p<0.001). In CAP, 13.8% of patients experiencing thrombotic events died vs. 1.8% of thrombotic event-free ones (p<0.001). A multivariable COX-regression analysis confirmed a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients with thrombotic events (HR 2.1; 95% CI: 1.4-3.3; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Compared with CAP, COVID-19 is characterized by a higher burden of thrombotic events, different thrombosis typology and higher risk of thrombosis-related in-hospital mortality.

2.
Biomedicines ; 9(9)2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1408456

ABSTRACT

The synergic combination of D-dimer (as proxy of thrombotic/vascular injury) and static compliance (as proxy of parenchymal injury) in predicting mortality in COVID-19-ARDS has not been systematically evaluated. The objective is to determine whether the combination of elevated D-dimer and low static compliance can predict mortality in patients with COVID-19-ARDS. A "training sample" (March-June 2020) and a "testing sample" (September 2020-January 2021) of adult patients invasively ventilated for COVID-19-ARDS were collected in nine hospitals. D-dimer and compliance in the first 24 h were recorded. Study outcome was all-cause mortality at 28-days. Cut-offs for D-dimer and compliance were identified by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Mutually exclusive groups were selected using classification tree analysis with chi-square automatic interaction detection. Time to death in the resulting groups was estimated with Cox regression adjusted for SOFA, sex, age, PaO2/FiO2 ratio, and sample (training/testing). "Training" and "testing" samples amounted to 347 and 296 patients, respectively. Three groups were identified: D-dimer ≤ 1880 ng/mL (LD); D-dimer > 1880 ng/mL and compliance > 41 mL/cmH2O (LD-HC); D-dimer > 1880 ng/mL and compliance ≤ 41 mL/cmH2O (HD-LC). 28-days mortality progressively increased in the three groups (from 24% to 35% and 57% (training) and from 27% to 39% and 60% (testing), respectively; p < 0.01). Adjusted mortality was significantly higher in HD-LC group compared with LD (HR = 0.479, p < 0.001) and HD-HC (HR = 0.542, p < 0.01); no difference was found between LD and HD-HC. In conclusion, combination of high D-dimer and low static compliance identifies a clinical phenotype with high mortality in COVID-19-ARDS.

3.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 87(8): 854-855, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1405590

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Brain Sci ; 11(9)2021 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390537

ABSTRACT

Individuals affected by Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) may experience psychiatric symptoms, including depression and suicidal ideation, that could lead to chronic impairment and a reduction in quality of life. Specifically, depressive disorder shows high incidence and may lead to chronic impairment and a reduction in the quality of life. To date, no studies on the presence of suicidality and quantitative analysis of depressive symptoms and their risk factors have yet been published. In this study, we aim to assess the prevalence of depressive symptoms and related risk factors at 3 months after discharge to home care following hospitalization for COVID-19 infection. METHODS: Participants were contacted three months after hospital discharge from one of the five COVID-19 hospitals in Rome, as part of a larger project on health outcomes in COVID-19 inpatients (Long Term Neuropsychiatric Disorder in COVID-19 Project), and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) was administered by telephone interview. RESULTS: Of 115 participants, 14.8% (N = 17) received a PHQ-9-based diagnosis of depression, and n = 7 of them scored 1 or more on the item on suicidality. A linear regression model showed the predictive role of female sex, pulmonary chronic condition and previous mental disorder in the development of depressive disorder; the latter was confirmed also by binary logistic regression. Severity indexes of disease (length of hospitalization and intensive care treatment) were found not to be associated with the development of depressive symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A small but clinically meaningful number of participants in the current study reported that they experienced symptoms of depression and suicidal ideation 3 months post-discharge from their COVID-19 hospitalization. In particular, given the findings that a history of prior psychiatric disorders was predictive of the development of depression symptoms, clinicians should carefully monitor for the presence of all psychiatric symptoms at follow-up visits.

5.
Int J Cardiol ; 339: 235-242, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) can occur in COVID-19 and has impact on clinical course. Data on CVD prevalence in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and sequelae in survivors is limited. Aim of this prospective study carried out on consecutive unselected COVID-19 population, was to assess: 1) CVD occurrence among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 2) persistence or new onset of CVD at one-month and one-year follow-up. METHODS: Over 30 days n = 152 COVID-19 patients underwent cardiovascular evaluation. Standard electrocardiogram (ECG), Troponin and echocardiography were integrated by further tests when indicated. Medical history, arterial blood gas, blood tests, chest computed tomography and treatment were recorded. CVD was defined as the occurrence of a new condition during the hospitalization for COVID-19. Survivors attended a one-month follow-up visit and a one-year telephone follow-up. RESULTS: Forty-two patients (28%) experienced a wide spectrum of CVD with acute myocarditis being the most frequent. Death occurred in 32 patients (21%) and more frequently in patients who developed CVD (p = 0.032). After adjustment for confounders, CVD was independently associated with death occurrence. At one-month follow-up visit, 7 patients (9%) presented persistent or delayed CVD. At one-year telephone follow-up, 57 patients (48%) reported persistent symptoms. CONCLUSION: Cardiovascular evaluation in COVID-19 patients is crucial since the occurrence of CVD in hospitalized COVID-19 patients is common (28%), requires specific treatment and increases the risk of in-hospital mortality. Persistence or delayed presentation of CVD at 1-month (9%) and persistent symptoms at 1-year follow-up (48%) suggest the need for monitoring COVID-19 survivors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Myocarditis , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Intern Emerg Med ; 16(5): 1231-1237, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1293431

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) may experience venous thrombosis while data regarding arterial thrombosis are sparse. METHODS: Prospective multicenter study in 5 hospitals including 373 patients with Covid-19-related pneumonia. Demographic data, laboratory findings including coagulation tests and comorbidities were reported. During the follow-up any arterial or venous thrombotic events and death were registered. RESULTS: Among 373 patients, 75 (20%) had a thrombotic event and 75 (20%) died. Thrombotic events included 41 venous thromboembolism and 34 arterial thrombosis. Age, cardiovascular disease, intensive care unit treatment, white blood cells, D-dimer, albumin and troponin blood levels were associated with thrombotic events. In a multivariable regression logistic model, intensive care unit treatment (Odds Ratio [OR]: 6.0; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 2.8-12.6; p < 0.001); coronary artery disease (OR: 2.4; 95% CI 1.4-5.0; p = 0.022); and albumin levels (OR: 0.49; 95% CI 0.28-0.87; p = 0.014) were associated with ischemic events. Age, sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, heart failure, coronary heart disease, intensive care unit treatment, in-hospital thrombotic events, D-dimer, C-reactive protein, troponin, and albumin levels were associated with mortality. A multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that in-hospital thrombotic events (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.72; 95% CI 1.59-4.65; p < 0.001), age (HR: 1.035; 95% CI 1.014-1.057; p = 0.001), and albumin (HR: 0.447; 95% CI 0.277-0.723; p = 0.001) predicted morality. CONCLUSIONS: Covid-19 patients experience an equipollent rate of venous and arterial thrombotic events, that are associated with poor survival. Early identification and appropriate treatment of Covid-19 patients at risk of thrombosis may improve prognosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Coronary Artery Disease/etiology , Mortality/trends , Thromboembolism/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronary Artery Disease/epidemiology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/analysis , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Proportional Hazards Models , Prospective Studies , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
7.
Infection ; 2021 Jun 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1281346

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Superinfections in patients hospitalized in intensive care unit (ICU) are an important and challenging complication, also in COVID-19. However, no definitive data are available about the role of multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) in COVID-19. METHODS: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study including patients with MDR-AB infections admitted to ICU with or without COVID-19, between January 2019 and January 2021. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate risk factor for MDR-AB infections in ICU patients hospitalized for COVID-19 or other etiology. The secondary endpoints were 30-days mortality in all study population and risk factors associated with development of bloodstream infection (BSI). RESULTS: During the study period 32 adults with COVID-19 were enrolled and compared with 115 patients admitted in the same ICU for other reasons. We observed a total of 114 deaths, with a survival rate of 29.3%: 18.8% in COVID-19 and 32.2% in control group. Relative risk for MDR-AB infection in COVID-19 showed that serum lactate levels mmol/l > 2, Acinetobacter baumannii colonization, BSI and steroid therapy were observed more frequently in COVID-19 patients. Cox regression analysis showed that serum lactate levels > 2 mmol/l, Acinetobacter baumannii colonization, BSI, and steroid therapy were associated with 30-days mortality. Finally, patients with COVID-19, white blood cells count > 11,000 mm3, serum lactate levels > 2 mmol/l, infections at time of ICU admission, Acinetobacter baumannii colonization, and steroid therapy were independently associated with development of BSI. CONCLUSIONS: Our data highlight the impact of BSI on outcome, the role of Acinetobacter baumannii colonization and the use of steroids on the risk to develop MDR-AB infections also during COVID-19.

8.
J Gen Intern Med ; 36(6): 1702-1707, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156989

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe but treatable mental disorder that develops after a life-threatening traumatic event. Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) hospitalisation is a potentially traumatic experience, especially in severe cases. Furthermore, the unprecedented context of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic, with daily media bombardment about COVID-19 mortality, may have amplified life-threatening perception also in patients with moderate infection. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of PTSD at 3-month follow-up in patients hospitalised for COVID-19 infection. DESIGN: In this cohort follow-up study conducted in a large Italian academic COVID-19 hospital, 115 recruited survivors were contacted by telephone 3 months after discharge to home care. The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 was administered. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyse risk factors for the development of PTSD. KEY RESULTS: A total of 10.4% of the sample received a PCL-5-based diagnosis of PTSD. Other 8.6% of the sample received a diagnosis of subthreshold PTSD, which leads to significant levels of distress and impairment. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that previous psychiatric diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 6.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.7-78.6, p < 0.001) and obesity (OR = 3.51, 95% CI: 1.4-857.9, p = 0.03) were risk factors for developing PTSD. Chronic pulmonary diseases approached significance as a risk factor (OR = 6.03, 95% CI: 1.0-37.1, p = 0.053). Male sex was a protective factor (OR=0.04, 95% CI: 0.0-0.041, p = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: PTSD and subthreshold PTSD rates in patients hospitalised for COVID-19 are worrying. Female sex and pre-existing mental disorders are established risk factors for PTSD, while the prospective association with obesity needs further investigation. Clinicians treating COVID-19 should consider screening for PTSD at follow-up assessments in patients discharged from the hospital.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Patient Discharge , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Survivors
9.
J Med Virol ; 93(7): 4319-4325, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118173

ABSTRACT

Teicoplanin has a potential antiviral activity expressed against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and was suggested as a complementary option to treat coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients. In this multicentric, retrospective, observational research the aim was to evaluate the impact of teicoplanin on the course of COVID-19 in critically ill patients. Fifty-five patients with severe COVID-19, hospitalized in the intensive care units (ICUs) and treated with best available therapy were retrospectively analysed. Among them 34 patients were also treated with teicoplanin (Tei-COVID group), while 21 without teicoplanin (control group). Crude in-hospital Day-30 mortality was lower in Tei-COVID group (35.2%) than in control group (42.8%), however not reaching statistical significance (p = .654). No statistically significant differences in length of stay in the ICU were observed between Tei-COVID group and control group (p = .248). On Day 14 from the ICU hospitalization, viral clearance was achieved in 64.7% patients of Tei-COVID group and 57.1% of control group, without statistical difference. Serum C-reactive protein level was significantly reduced in Tei-COVID group compared to control group, but not other biochemical parameters. Finally, Gram-positive were the causative pathogens for 25% of BSIs in Tei-COVID group and for 70.6% in controls. No side effects related to teicoplanin use were observed. Despite several limitations require further research, in this study the use of teicoplanin is not associated with a significant improvement in outcomes analysed. The antiviral activity of teicoplanin against SARS-CoV-2, previously documented, is probably more effective at early clinical stages.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospital Mortality , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Teicoplanin/therapeutic use , Aged , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
11.
Front Nutr ; 7: 613928, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1052491

ABSTRACT

Background: Mounting evidence suggests SARS-CoV-2 may impact on host microbiota and gut inflammation, infecting intestinal epithelial cells. This possible link and its implications can be investigated by observing the effects of modulation of the microbial flora in patients with COVID-19. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of mortality, the need of ICU hospitalization and the length of hospitalization in patients with severe COVID-19 pneumonia who received the best available therapy (BAT) vs. patients treated with BAT and supplemented with oral bacteriotherapy. Methods: This retrospective, observational cohort study included 200 adults with severe COVID-19 pneumonia. All patients received therapeutic regimens including low molecular weight heparin plus one or more between hydroxychloroquine, azithromycin, antivirals, and Tocilizumab. Oral bacteriotherapy was used as complementary treatment. Results: Out of the 200 patients, 112 received BAT without oral bacteriotherapy, and 88 BAT with oral bacteriotherapy. Crude mortality was 22%. Eleven percent died in the group of patients treated with BAT plus oral bacteriotherapy vs. 30% subjects in the group of patients managed only with BAT (p < 0.001). By multivariate analysis, the age >65 years, CRP >41.8 mg/L, Platelets <150.000 mmc, and cardiovascular events were associated with the increased risk of mortality. Oral bacteriotherapy was an independent variable associated with a reduced risk for death. Despite large prospective trials are needed, this study highlights a possible role for oral bacteriotherapy in the management of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 pneumonia.

12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(2)2021 01 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024582

ABSTRACT

Prevention of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in healthcare workers (HCWs) facing the current COVID-19 pandemic is a challenge worldwide as HCWs are likely to experience acute and chronic, often unpredictable, occupational stressors leading to PTSS. This review aims to analyze the literature to discover which topics have been focused on and what the latest developments are in managing the occupational risk of PTSS in HCWs during the current pandemic. For the purpose of this review, we searched for publications in MEDLINE/Pubmed using selected keywords. The articles were reviewed and categorized into one or more of the following categories based on their subject matter: risk assessment, risk management, occurrence rates. A total of 16 publications matched our inclusion criteria. The topics discussed were: "Risk Assessment", "Occurrence Rates", and "Risk Management". Young age, low work experience, female gender, heavy workload, working in unsafe settings, and lack of training and social support were found to be predictors of PTSS. This review's findings showed the need for urgent interventions aimed at protecting HCWs from the psychological impact of traumatic events related to the pandemic and leading to PTSS; healthcare policies need to consider preventive and management strategies toward PTSS, and the related psychic sequelae, in HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Humans , Pandemics , Risk Assessment , Risk Management , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
13.
Blood Purif ; 50(6): 767-771, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013077

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) for severe respiratory failure. The aim is to evaluate the rate of AKI, defined according to Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcome guidelines, in a series of critical COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU of a single tertiary teaching hospital. METHODS: From April to May 2020, all consecutive critically ill COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU who did not meet exclusion criteria (length of ICU stay <48 h, ESRD requiring dialysis, and patients still hospitalized in ICU at the time of data analysis) were enrolled in this study. Patients were stratified according to the highest AKI stage attained during ICU stay. RESULTS: Sixty-one patients were included in the analysis. AKI was observed in 35/61 patients (57.4%): 25/35 episodes (71.4%) were observed within the first 7 days. AKI was classified as follows: 17.1% stage 1, 25.7% stage 2, and 57.2% stage 3. Fourteen out of 20 stage-3 patients required continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), mostly related to persistent oliguria. The overall ICU mortality was 68.9%, and it was higher in patients developing AKI if compared to no-AKI patients (p = 0.006). Renal function recovery of any grade was observed in 14 out of 35 AKI patients (40%). Among patients undergoing CRRT, 13 patients were still dialysis dependent at the time of death. CONCLUSION: In critical COVID-19 patients, ICU mortality is particularly high, especially in patients developing AKI. An accurate monitoring of renal function in early phases of respiratory failure should be ensured in order to timely apply any strategy aimed at limiting renal complications during ICU stay.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
J Thromb Thrombolysis ; 52(1): 105-110, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1002136

ABSTRACT

Patients with Coronavirus-associated disease-2019 (COVID-19) display alterations of the hemostatic system and the presence of a prothrombotic status frequently leading to vascular complications. However, the impact of COVID-19 on platelet activity, aggregation and agglutination still needs to be clarified. We measured total levels of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and vWF binding to the platelet glycoprotein (Gp) complex (GPIb-IX-V), in a cohort of COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit of our Institution. Moreover, we evaluated platelet aggregation in response to agonists (ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid) and platelet agglutination in response to ristocetin. We found that levels of vWF antigen and the active form of vWF binding to platelets (vWF:RCo), were markedly increased in these patients. These results were associated with higher agglutination rates induced by ristocetin, thereby indirectly indicating an increased capability of vWF to bind to platelets. Conversely, we found that platelet aggregation in response to both ADP and collagen was lower in COVID-19 patients compared to healthy volunteers. This study shows that COVID-19 is associated with increased vWF-induced platelet agglutination but reduced platelet responsivity to aggregation stimuli. Our findings have translational relevance since platelet adhesion to vWF may represent a marker to predict possible complications and better delineate therapeutic strategies in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Platelet Aggregation , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Agglutination , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Platelet Function Tests , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/diagnosis , Thrombosis/virology
16.
J Med Virol ; 93(4): 2210-2220, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-893240

ABSTRACT

The evaluation of new therapeutic resources against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) represents a priority in clinical research considering the minimal options currently available. To evaluate the adjuvant use of systemic oxygen-ozone administration in the early control of disease progression in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. PROBIOZOVID is an ongoing, interventional, randomized, prospective, and double-arm trial enrolling patient with COVID-19 pneumonia. From a total of 85 patients screened, 28 were recruited. Patients were randomly divided into ozone-autohemotherapy group (14) and control group (14). The procedure consisted in a daily double-treatment with systemic Oxygen-ozone administration for 7 days. All patients were treated with ad interim best available therapy. The primary outcome was delta in the number of patients requiring orotracheal-intubation despite treatment. Secondary outcome was the difference of mortality between the two groups. Moreover, hematological parameters were compared before and after treatment. No differences in the characteristics between groups were observed at baseline. As a preliminary report we have observed that one patient for each group needed intubation and was transferred to ITU. No deaths were observed at 7-14 days of follow up. Thirty-day mortality was 8.3% for ozone group and 10% for controls. Ozone therapy did not significantly influence inflammation markers, hematology profile, and lymphocyte subpopulations of patients treated. Ozone therapy had an impact on the need for the ventilatory support, although did not reach statistical significance. Finally, no adverse events related to the use of ozone-autohemotherapy were reported. Preliminary results, although not showing statistically significant benefits of ozone on COVID-19, did not report any toxicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Ozone/administration & dosage , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Subsets/drug effects , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/adverse effects , Ozone/adverse effects , Probiotics/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
18.
Cardiovasc Diabetol ; 19(1): 164, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cardiometabolic disorders may worsen Covid-19 outcomes. We investigated features and Covid-19 outcomes for patients with or without diabetes, and with or without cardiometabolic multimorbidity. METHODS: We collected and compared data retrospectively from patients hospitalized for Covid-19 with and without diabetes, and with and without cardiometabolic multimorbidity (defined as ≥ two of three risk factors of diabetes, hypertension or dyslipidaemia). Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the risk of the primary composite outcome (any of mechanical ventilation, admission to an intensive care unit [ICU] or death) in patients with diabetes and in those with cardiometabolic multimorbidity, adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: Of 354 patients enrolled, those with diabetes (n = 81), compared with those without diabetes (n = 273), had characteristics associated with the primary composite outcome that included older age, higher prevalence of hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), higher levels of inflammatory markers and a lower PaO2/FIO2 ratio. The risk of the primary composite outcome in the 277 patients who completed the study as of May 15th, 2020, was higher in those with diabetes (Adjusted Odds Ratio (adjOR) 2.04, 95%CI 1.12-3.73, p = 0.020), hypertension (adjOR 2.31, 95%CI: 1.37-3.92, p = 0.002) and COPD (adjOR 2.67, 95%CI 1.23-5.80, p = 0.013). Patients with cardiometabolic multimorbidity were at higher risk compared to patients with no cardiometabolic conditions (adjOR 3.19 95%CI 1.61-6.34, p = 0.001). The risk for patients with a single cardiometabolic risk factor did not differ with that for patients with no cardiometabolic risk factors (adjOR 1.66, 0.90-3.06, adjp = 0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with diabetes hospitalized for Covid-19 present with high-risk features. They are at increased risk of adverse outcomes, likely because diabetes clusters with other cardiometabolic conditions.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiovascular Diseases/diagnosis , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Metabolic Diseases/diagnosis , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Middle Aged , Multimorbidity/trends , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(9): e0220, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-802497

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To describe patients according to the maximum degree of respiratory support received and report their inpatient mortality due to coronavirus disease 2019. Design: Analysis of patients in the Coracle registry from February 22, 2020, to April 1, 2020. Setting: Hospitals in the Piedmont, Lombardy, Tuscany, and Lazio regions of Italy. Patients: Nine-hundred forty-eight patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Among 948 patients, 122 (12.87%) received invasive ventilation, 637 (67.19%) received supplemental oxygen only, and 189 (19.94%) received no respiratory support. The median (quartile 1-quartile 3) age was 65 years (54-76.59 yr), and there was evidence of differential respiratory treatment by decade of life (p = 0.0046); patients greater than 80 years old were generally not intubated. There were 606 men (63.9%) in this study, and they were more likely to receive respiratory support than women (p < 0.0001). The rate of in-hospital death for invasive ventilation recipients was 22.95%, 12.87% for supplemental oxygen recipients, and 7.41% for those who received neither (p = 0.0004). A sensitivity analysis of the 770 patients less than 80 years old revealed a lower, but similar mortality trend (18.02%, 8.10%, 5.23%; p = 0.0008) among the 14.42%, 65.71%, and 19.87% of patients treated with mechanical ventilation, supplemental oxygen only, or neither. Overall, invasive ventilation recipients who died were significantly older than those who survived (median age: 68.5 yr [60-81.36 yr] vs 62.5 yr [55.52-71 yr]; p = 0.0145). Conclusions: Among patients hospitalized for coronavirus disease 2019, 13% received mechanical ventilation, which was associated with a mortality rate of 23%.

20.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 169: 108454, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778739

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To evaluate whether subjects with diabetes hospitalized for Coronavirus disease-19 (Covid-19) represent a subgroup of patients with high-risk clinical features compared to patients with diabetes without Covid-19. METHODS: In this case-control study 79 patients with type 2 diabetes out of 354 adults hospitalized for Covid-19 and 158 controls with type 2 diabetes but without Covid-19, matched for age and gender, were enrolled. Medical history and concomitant therapies were retrieved from medical charts and compared between cases and controls, controlling for confounders. RESULTS: Fully-adjusted multivariate logistic regression model showed that previous CVD history did not differ between patients with and without Covid-19 (odds ratio 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.59-3.32, p = 0.45). A higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 3.72, 95%CI: 1.42-9.72, p = 0.007) and of chronic kidney disease (CKD) (OR 3.08, 95%CI: 1.18-8.06, p = 0.022) and a lower prevalence of ever smokers (OR 0.30, 95%CI: 0.13-0.67, p = 0.003), of users of lipid lowering agents (OR 0.26, 95%CI: 0.12-0.54, p < 0.001), and of anti-hypertensive drugs (OR 0.39, 95%CI: 0.16-0.93, p = 0.033) were found among cases. CONCLUSIONS: CVD prevalence does not differ between people with diabetes with and without Covid-19 requiring hospitalization. An increased prevalence of COPD and of CKD in Covid-19 patients with type 2 diabetes is suggested. These findings aid to clarify the relationship between underlying conditions and SARS-CoV-2 infection in the high-risk group of patients with diabetes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/pathology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/pathology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/pathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/epidemiology , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/virology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/virology
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