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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322200

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The complications of Severe Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) are attributed to the overproduction of early response proinflammatory cytokines, causing a systemic hyperinflammatory state. Statins are potentially a potent adjuvant therapy in COVID-19 infection due to their pleiotropic and anti-inflammatory effects, which are independent of their cholesterol-lowering activity. This study investigates the impact of statin use on the outcome of critically ill patients with COVID-19. Methods A multicenter, retrospective cohort study of all adult critically ill patients with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs) between March 1, 2020, and March 31, 2021. Eligible patients were classified into two groups based on statin use during ICU stay and were matched with a propensity score which was based on patient’s age and admission APACHE II and SOFA scores. The primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. Other outcomes were considered secondary... Results A total of 1049 patients were eligible;502 patients were included after propensity score matching (1:1 ratio). The 30-day (hazard ratio 0.75 (95% CI 0.58, 0.98), P  = 0.03) and in-hospital mortality (hazard ratio 0.69 (95% CI 0.54, 0.89), P  = 0.004) were significantly lower in patients who received statin therapy on multivariable cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Moreover, patients who received statin have a lower risk of hospital-acquired pneumonia (OR 0.48(95% CI 0.32, 0.69), P  = < 0.001), lower levels of markers of inflammation on follow up and no increased risk of liver injury. Conclusion The use of statin during ICU stay in COVID-19 critically ill patients may have a beneficial role and survival benefits with a good safety profile.

2.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1365266

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
3.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(7): 832-838, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Estimated seroprevalence of Coronavirus Infectious Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a critical evidence for a better evaluation of the virus spread and monitoring the progress of COVID-19 pandemic in a population. In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence has been reported in specific regions, but an extensive nationwide study has not been reported. Here, we report a nationwide study to determine the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 in the population of KSA during the pandemic, using serum samples from healthy blood donors, non-COVID patients and healthcare workers (HCWs) in six different regions of the kingdom, with addition samples from COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A total of 11,703 serum samples were collected from different regions of the KSA including; 5395 samples from residual healthy blood donors (D); 5877 samples from non-COVID patients collected through residual sera at clinical biochemistry labs from non-COVID patients (P); and 400 samples from consented HCWs. To determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2, all serum samples, in addition to positive control sera from RT-PCR confirmed COVID-19 patients, were subjected to in-house ELISA with a sample pooling strategy, which was further validated by testing individual samples that make up some of the pools, with a statistical estimation method to report seroprevalence estimates. RESULTS: Overall (combining D and P groups) seroprevalence estimate was around 11% in Saudi Arabia; and was 5.1% (Riyadh), 1.5% (Jazan), 18.4% (Qassim), 20.8% (Hail), 14.7% (ER; Alahsa), and 18.8% in Makkah. Makkah samples were only D group and had a rate of 24.4% and 12.8% in the cities of Makkah and Jeddah, respectively. The seroprevalence in Saudi Arabia across the sampled areas would be 12 times the reported COVID-19 infection rate. Among HCWs, 7.5% (4.95-10.16 CI 95%) had reactive antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 without reporting any previously confirmed infection. This was higher in HCWs with hypertension. The study also presents the demographics and prevalence of co-morbidities in HCWs and subset of non-COVID-19 population. INTERPRETATION: Our study estimates the overall national serological prevalence of COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia to be 11%, with an apparent disparity between regions. This indicates the prevalence of asymptomatic or mild unreported COVID-19 cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Humans , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies
4.
J Clin Invest ; 131(14)2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247462

ABSTRACT

A recent report found that rare predicted loss-of-function (pLOF) variants across 13 candidate genes in TLR3- and IRF7-dependent type I IFN pathways explain up to 3.5% of severe COVID-19 cases. We performed whole-exome or whole-genome sequencing of 1,864 COVID-19 cases (713 with severe and 1,151 with mild disease) and 15,033 ancestry-matched population controls across 4 independent COVID-19 biobanks. We tested whether rare pLOF variants in these 13 genes were associated with severe COVID-19. We identified only 1 rare pLOF mutation across these genes among 713 cases with severe COVID-19 and observed no enrichment of pLOFs in severe cases compared to population controls or mild COVID-19 cases. We found no evidence of association of rare LOF variants in the 13 candidate genes with severe COVID-19 outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , Interferon Type I/genetics , Interferon Type I/immunology , Loss of Function Mutation , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Case-Control Studies , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Interferon Regulatory Factor-7/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Whole Exome Sequencing , Whole Genome Sequencing , Young Adult
5.
Genomics ; 113(4): 1733-1741, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171554

ABSTRACT

Interferon-induced membrane proteins (IFITM) 3 gene variants are known risk factor for severe viral diseases. We examined whether IFITM3 variant may underlie the heterogeneous clinical outcomes of SARS-CoV-2 infection-induced COVID-19 in large Arab population. We genotyped 880 Saudi patients; 93.8% were PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, encompassing most COVID-19 phenotypes. Mortality at 90 days was 9.1%. IFITM3-SNP, rs12252-G allele was associated with hospital admission (OR = 1.65 [95% CI; 1.01-2.70], P = 0.04]) and mortality (OR = 2.2 [95% CI; 1.16-4.20], P = 0.01). Patients less than 60 years old had a lower survival probability if they harbor this allele (log-rank test P = 0.002). Plasma levels of IFNγ were significantly lower in a subset of patients with AG/GG genotypes than patients with AA genotype (P = 0.00016). Early identification of these individuals at higher risk of death may inform precision public health response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Membrane Proteins/genetics , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Female , Genetic Association Studies , Genotype , Humans , Interferons/genetics , Male , Middle Aged , Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
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