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1.
Saudi J Med Med Sci ; 8(3): 227-238, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-782280

ABSTRACT

The Saudi Lymphoma Group had previously published recommendations on the management of the major subtypes of lymphoma. However, the effect the currently ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has on the management of patients with lymphoma has been paramount. Therefore, the Saudi Lymphoma Group has decided to provide clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis, management and follow-up of patients with various types of lymphoma during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2.
Clin Lymphoma Myeloma Leuk ; 21(1): e66-e75, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-718689

ABSTRACT

Histiocytic disorders are an exceptionally rare group of diseases with diverse manifestations and a paucity of approved treatments, thereby leading to various challenges in their diagnosis and management. With the discovery of novel molecular targets and the incorporation of targeted agents in the management of various adult histiocytic disorders, their management has become increasingly complex. In an attempt to improve the understanding of the clinical features and management of common adult histiocytic disorders (Langerhans cell histiocytosis, Erdheim-Chester disease, Rosai-Dorfman disease, and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis), we created this document based on existing literature and expert opinion.


Subject(s)
Erdheim-Chester Disease/drug therapy , Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell/drug therapy , Histiocytosis, Sinus/drug therapy , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Adult , Drug Therapy, Combination , Erdheim-Chester Disease/diagnosis , Histiocytosis, Langerhans-Cell/diagnosis , Histiocytosis, Sinus/diagnosis , Humans , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Treatment Outcome
3.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 518-524, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-18719

ABSTRACT

Outbreaks of infectious etiology, particularly those caused by a novel virus that has no known treatment or vaccine, may result in the interruption of medical care provided to patients with cancer and put them at risk for undertreatment in addition to the risk of being exposed to infection, a life-threatening event among patients with cancer. This article describes the approach used to manage patients with cancer during a large-scale Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus hospital outbreak in Saudi Arabia to ensure continuity of care and minimize harm from treatment interruption or acquiring infection. The approach taken toward managing this high-risk situation (COVID-19) could be easily adopted by health care organizations and would be helpful to ensure readiness for the occurrence of future outbreaks of different infectious etiologies like those recent episodes of new coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Continuity of Patient Care , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
4.
JCO Glob Oncol ; 6: 471-475, 2020 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-11409

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study investigated the features of oncology patients with confirmed Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) at the Ministry of National Guard Health Affairs-Riyadh during the outbreak of June 2015 to determine the clinical course and outcome of affected patients. METHODS: The patients' demographic information, cancer history, treatment pattern, information about MERS-coronavirus (CoV) infection, history of travel, clinical symptoms, test results, and outcome were collected and analyzed as part of a quality improvement project to improve the care and safety of our patients. Only patients with confirmed infection were included. RESULTS: A total of 19 patients were identified, with a median age of 66 years (range, 16-88 years), and 12 patients (63%) were males. The most common underlying disease was hematologic malignancies (47.4%), followed by colorectal cancer (21%) and lung cancer (15.8%). Hypertension and diabetes mellitus were the most common comorbidities (57.9% and 52.6%, respectively). Infection was diagnosed by nasopharyngeal swab in all patients. All patients contracted the infection during their hospitalization for other reasons. Sixteen patients (80%) were admitted to the intensive care unit; 13 patients (81%) had acute respiratory distress syndrome, 11 were intubated (68.75%), 9 had acute renal injury (56.25%), and 3 required dialysis (18.75%). Only 3 patients (15.8%) with early-stage cancers survived. Patients with hematologic malignancies and advanced solid tumors had a 100% case fatality rate. The majority of the causes of death were due to multi-organ failure and septic shock. CONCLUSION: MERS-CoV infection resulted in a high case fatality rate in patients with malignancy. Therefore, it is critical to implement effective primary preventive measures to avoid exposure of patients with cancer to the virus.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Neoplasms/virology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/mortality , Renal Dialysis , Retrospective Studies , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Travel , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
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