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2.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 11(11)2023 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237830

ABSTRACT

Migration has become a de facto phenomenon in the contemporary globalized world and India is not untouched. Indian labourers from the states of Bihar and Uttar Pradesh migrated to the UAE in search of better jobs and prospects. They migrated alone and left behind their families. The distance between them and their family can also create mental disorders; therefore, it becomes necessary to analyze the mental health of the migrant workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The current study is quantitative and based on a sample survey approach. The researchers collected 416 samples through a structured questionnaire and used the snowball sampling technique. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's correlation coefficient, chi-square test and logistic regression were utilized to analyze and interpret the results. The outbreak of coronavirus disturbed their livelihood resulting in a cut to their salary or earnings; in total, 83% of migrants were affected by the COVID-19 outbreak in terms of loss of their income, out of which 76% were affected by less than AED 1000. The respondents' mental health was worrisome, but they were hopeful for the future. In total, 73.5% of respondents felt nervous, 62% felt depressed, 77% felt lonely, 63.4% had a hard time sleeping, and 63% had difficulties concentrating. The findings of the study draw attention to the policymakers to carry out necessary provisions to the targeted psychologically affected community. The findings also suggest creating awareness among the people by using social networking sites and diagnosing mental disorders on an urgent basis.

3.
Clin Lab ; 69(4)2023 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291467

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During viral infections such as SARS-CoV-2, epigenetic changes within the promoter region of the immune system genes would possibly occur and have an effect on the immune system response as well as disease outcome. We aimed to evaluate and compare the methylation level of the IFITM1 gene promoter in different stages of COVID-19 disease with a healthy control group. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 75 COVID-19 patients (25 mild, 25 severe, and 25 critical in addition to 25 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers) have been included. DNA was extracted from the peripheral white blood cells using a commercial DNA extraction kit. PCR was performed using two types of primers designed for the methylated and unmethylated forms of the IFITM1 gene promoter. RESULTS: The mean age of the patient and healthy volunteer groups was 52.733 ± 13.780 and 49.120 ± 12.490, respectively. Out of a hundred participants, 52 were male. The results demonstrated that severe (p = 0.03, OR 6.729) and critical (p = 0.001, OR 11.156) patients were much more likely to show methylation of the IFITM1 gene in contrast with mild patients. Moreover, IFITM1 methylation was significantly higher in COVID-19 patients in comparison with the healthy volunteer group (p = 0.004, OR 3.17). Furthermore, IFITM1 methylation in male patients with critical status, (p = 0.01) was significantly higher than in male patients with mild status. In addition, IFITM1 methylation of male (p = 0.03) and female (p = 0.01) critical patients was considerably higher compared to males and females of volunteer group. CONCLUSIONS: Increased methylation of the IFITM1 gene in the severe and critical stage of COVID-19 diseases may indicate the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in increasing methylation of this antiviral gene. This might be involved in suppressing the immune system, promoting SARS-CoV-2 replication and disease outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , COVID-19/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Methylation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Promoter Regions, Genetic , DNA Methylation
5.
Med (New York, NY) ; 2023.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2272796

ABSTRACT

Background Both infection and vaccination, alone or in combination, generate antibody and T cell responses against SARS-CoV-2. However, the maintenance of such responses – and hence protection from disease – requires careful characterisation. In a large prospective study of UK healthcare workers (Protective immunity from T cells in Healthcare workers (PITCH), within the larger SARS-CoV-2 immunity & reinfection evaluation (SIREN) study) we previously observed that prior infection impacted strongly on subsequent cellular and humoral immunity induced after long and short dosing intervals of BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) vaccination. Methods Here, we report longer follow up of 684 HCWs in this cohort over 6-9 months following two doses of BNT162b2 or AZD1222 (Oxford/AstraZeneca) vaccination and up to 6 months following a subsequent mRNA booster vaccination. Findings We make three observations: Firstly, the dynamics of humoral and cellular responses differ;binding and neutralising antibodies declined whereas T and memory B cell responses were maintained after the second vaccine dose. Secondly, vaccine boosting restored IgG levels, broadened neutralising activity against variants of concern including omicron BA.1, BA.2 and BA.5, and boosted T cell responses above the 6-month level post dose 2. Thirdly, prior infection maintained its impact driving larger and broader T cell responses compared with never-infected people – a feature maintained until 6 months after the third dose. Conclusions Broadly cross-reactive T cell responses are well maintained over time – especially in those with combined vaccine and infection-induced immunity ("hybrid” immunity) – and may contribute to continued protection against severe disease. Funding Department for Health and Social Care, Medical Research Council Graphical abstract Moore et al. studied antibody and cellular responses to COVID-19 vaccines before and after dose 3. Antibody responses waned, but T cell responses were well maintained. T cells recognised Omicron variants better and for longer than antibodies. Differences due to vaccine regimen and previous infection evened out over time.

6.
PLOS global public health ; 2(11), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2249013

ABSTRACT

Lockdown has been recognized as a gold standard measure to limit COVID-19 infection among the general population;however, it has a deleterious impact on their mental well-being. Many studies measured the mental well-being of different population groups during the lockdown period. Nonetheless, very little is known about the mental well-being of the general population when the lockdown has been relaxed or withdrawn in a particular country. Our study aimed to measure the mental well-being of the general population when the lockdown was lifted in Bangladesh. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from December 1, 2020, to February 28, 2021, using both web-based data collection and in-person interview facilities. Data from 3035 general Bangladeshi aged 18 and above were analyzed. Mental well-being was measured using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) (Registration ID: 518226001). A multivariable linear regression model was employed to find the influential variables after controlling the confounders. The mean well-being score was 43.66. Well-being score was significantly lower among women (slope -2.171, p = <0.001), low-educated (slope -2.485, p = 0.018), and currently not working (slope -2.263, p = <0.001) population. However, we found significantly higher mental well-being scores among those with no comorbidity (slope 3.436, p = <0.001). Though the withdrawal of the lockdown improved the overall mental well-being of the general population, women, low-educated, not working, and the comorbid population were still suffering from low mental well-being problems. Special attention is recommended to address the vulnerable population when discussing the mental health of adult Bangladeshi during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

7.
Kybernetes ; 52(3):1070-1093, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2248331

ABSTRACT

PurposeWith the global outbreak of COVID-19 that has made the economic activities standstill, countries have taken immediate measures to safeguard not only the human lives but also the economies. This study investigates empirically the lockdown impact of current pandemic on the Saudi economy.Design/methodology/approachThe study employs inoperability input–output model (IIOM) on the input–output table (IOT) of Saudi Arabia for the analysis.FindingsFindings show that with the closure of few sectors for the period of two months, the GDP declined to 6.49%. Findings also show a negative impact on consumption, investments and exports.Research limitations/implicationsOne limitation of current study is that it uses IOTs which lack primary and secondary income distribution that is vital for presenting complete interindustry connections in the analysis. The interindustry structures relate to the consumption structures which ultimately lead to the income distribution and affect the consumption behaviors of economic agents. Hence, the complete income circular flow is not incorporated in IIOM using IOT. The findings of current study would be well grounded if it endogenized the primary and secondary income distribution.Practical implicationsThe practical implication of this study is the use of IIOM for anticipating the potential loss against the backdrop of catastrophes and pandemics. The IIOM has the capability to predict the economic effects of disruptive events and hence the policy-makers can better predict and devise prudent policies to avoid the likely threats to the economy.Originality/valueThe current situation is unprecedented, and it is challenging for governments to forecast the economic repercussions. Several economic sectors have been inoperative due to lockdown implemented by the governments. This study empirically estimated the inoperability produced by the current pandemic. The findings are consistent with other estimated statistics, thereby proving the efficacy of IIOM to anticipate the economic repercussions of natural hazards.

8.
Int J Ment Health Addict ; : 1-16, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2249022

ABSTRACT

The study aimed to measure Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice (KAP) and fear level towards COVID-19 and explore its cross-cultural variances in knowledge by sociodemographic factors among the general population of 8 different countries over 5 continents. It was a cross-sectional online survey. This survey was conducted in April 2020 among 1296 participants using the "Google Form" platform. Considering the social distancing formula and pandemic situation, we collect data using popular social media networks. Univariate and bivariate analyses were used to explore the collected data on KAP, fear, and sociodemographic factors. Overall knowledge score was 9.7 ± 1.7 (out of 12), and gender differences (female vs male: 9.8 ± 1.6 vs 9.5 ± 1.9) were significant (p = 0.008) in the bivariate analysis. Knowledge score variances were found significant in some regions by gender, marital status, and education qualification. The highest and lowest mean knowledge scores were recorded in the Middle East (10.0 ± 1.7) and Europe (9.3 ± 2.0). Despite having a high fear score (22.5 ± 5.6 out of 35), 78.35% of respondents were positively and 81.7% in a good practice level. Fear score rankings: Middle East (1st; 23.8 ± 5.5), Europe (2nd; 23.2 ± 5.8), Africa (3rd; 22.7 ± 5.0), South Asia (4th; 22.1 ± 5.7), Oceania (5th; 21.9 ± 5.8), and North America (6th; 21.7 ± 5.5). Fear and knowledge were not correlated. KAP and fear variation exist among geographical regions. Gender, marital status, and education qualification are factors in knowledge variances for some regions. KAP and fear measures can help health education programs consider some sociodemographic factors and regions during an outbreak of highly contagious disease and uplift a positive attitude and good practice. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s11469-021-00638-4.

9.
Clin Complement Med Pharmacol ; 2(4): 100041, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2249023

ABSTRACT

Background: At a global level, the COVID-19 disease outbreak has had a major impact on health services and has induced disruption in routine care of health institutions, exposing cancer patients to severe risks. To provide uninterrupted tumor treatment throughout a pandemic lockdown is a major obstacle. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and its causative virus, SARS-CoV-2, stance considerable challenges for the management of oncology patients. COVID-19 presents particularly severe respiratory and systemic infection in aging and immunosuppressed individuals, including patients with cancer. Objective: In the present review, we focused on emergent evidence from cancer sufferers that have been contaminated with COVID-19 and cancer patients who were at higher risk of severe COVID-19, and indicates that anticancer treatment may either rise COVID-19 susceptibility or have a duple therapeutic impact on cancer as well as COVID-19; moreover, how SARS-CoV-2 infection impacts cancer cells. Also, to assess the global effect of the COVID-19 disease outbreak on cancer and its treatment. Methods: A literature survey was conducted using PubMed, Web of Science (WOS), Embase, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and VIral Protein domain DataBase (VIP DB) between Dec 1, 2019 and Sep 23, 2021, for studies on anticancer treatments in patients with COVID-19. The characteristics of the patients, treatment types, mortality, and other additional outcomes were extracted and pooled for synthesis. Results: This disease has a huge effect on sufferers who have cancer(s). Sufferers of COVID-19 have a greater percentage of tumor diagnoses than the rest of the population. Likewise, cancer and highest proportion is lung cancer sufferers are more susceptible to COVID-19 constriction than the rest of the population. Conclusion: Sufferers who have both COVID-19 and tumor have a considerably elevated death risk than single COVID-19 positive patients overall. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a reduction in the screening of cancer and detection, and also deferral of routine therapies, which may contribute to an increase in cancer mortality there in future.

10.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 207, 2023 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258558

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care facilities are responsible for preventing and controlling diseases and must be resilient enough to deal with crises. The Iranian health care facilities have faced challenges in managing COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to identify the challenges faced by the Iranian health care facilities during the Covid-19 epidemic and to provide solutions. METHODS: This qualitative study was conducted with a phenomenological approach and using semi-structured interviews with 59 healthcare policy makers, managers, and employees, and medical university faculty members. The participants were selected through purposive and snowball sampling. Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. RESULTS: Overall, 43 challenges to the resilience of health care facilities during the Covid-19 pandemic were identified and grouped into 8 themes (i.e., leadership and management, planning, organizational culture, organizational learning, employee management, customer management, resource management, and process management. The most important resilience challenges were: fragmented management system; poor leadership; incompatible health network structure; lack of a national holistic plan; poor case detection; insufficient resources; inefficient information system; negative attitude of managers and employee; organizational inertia; failure to build on lessons learned from crises; low workforce preparedness; lack of community-based management; and improper monitoring and evaluation. Managers should use community-based, evidence-based, and integrated management to build health system resilience against COVID-19, have sufficient knowledge and experience to organize operations, use appropriate and effective coordination models, develop a creative and participatory culture, reengineer processes, and provide necessary resources. CONCLUSION: The Iranian health care facilities face challenges that prevent them from becoming resilient, responsive, and efficient in managing COVID-19. Policy makers and managers should increase the resilience of health care facilities to shocks and crises by using the suggested measures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , Administrative Personnel , Health Facilities
11.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2240690

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with HIV on antiretroviral therapy with good CD4 T cell counts make effective immune responses following vaccination against SARS-CoV-2. There are few data on longer term responses and the impact of a booster dose. METHODS: Adults with HIV were enrolled into a single arm open label study. Two doses of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 were followed twelve months later by a third heterologous vaccine dose. Participants had undetectable viraemia on ART and CD4 counts >350 cells/µl. Immune responses to the ancestral strain and variants of concern were measured by anti-spike IgG ELISA, MesoScale Discovery (MSD) anti-spike platform, ACE-2 inhibition, Activation Induced Marker (AIM) assay and T cell proliferation. FINDINGS: 54 participants received two doses of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19. 43 received a third dose (42 with BNT162b2; 1 with mRNA-1273) one year after the first dose. After the third dose, total anti-SARS-CoV-2 spike IgG titres (MSD), ACE-2 inhibition and IgG ELISA results were significantly higher compared to Day 182 titres (P < 0.0001 for all three). SARS-CoV-2 specific CD4+ T cell responses measured by AIM against SARS-CoV-2 S1 and S2 peptide pools were significantly increased after a third vaccine compared to 6 months after a first dose, with significant increases in proliferative CD4 + and CD8+ T cell responses to SARS-CoV-2 S1 and S2 after boosting. Responses to Alpha, Beta, Gamma, and Delta variants were boosted, although to a lesser extent for Omicron. CONCLUSIONS: In PWH receiving a third vaccine dose, there were significant increases in B and T cell immunity, including to known VOCs.

12.
Med ; 4(3): 191-215.e9, 2023 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2243466

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Both infection and vaccination, alone or in combination, generate antibody and T cell responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, the maintenance of such responses-and hence protection from disease-requires careful characterization. In a large prospective study of UK healthcare workers (HCWs) (Protective Immunity from T Cells in Healthcare Workers [PITCH], within the larger SARS-CoV-2 Immunity and Reinfection Evaluation [SIREN] study), we previously observed that prior infection strongly affected subsequent cellular and humoral immunity induced after long and short dosing intervals of BNT162b2 (Pfizer/BioNTech) vaccination. METHODS: Here, we report longer follow-up of 684 HCWs in this cohort over 6-9 months following two doses of BNT162b2 or AZD1222 (Oxford/AstraZeneca) vaccination and up to 6 months following a subsequent mRNA booster vaccination. FINDINGS: We make three observations: first, the dynamics of humoral and cellular responses differ; binding and neutralizing antibodies declined, whereas T and memory B cell responses were maintained after the second vaccine dose. Second, vaccine boosting restored immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels; broadened neutralizing activity against variants of concern, including Omicron BA.1, BA.2, and BA.5; and boosted T cell responses above the 6-month level after dose 2. Third, prior infection maintained its impact driving larger and broader T cell responses compared with never-infected people, a feature maintained until 6 months after the third dose. CONCLUSIONS: Broadly cross-reactive T cell responses are well maintained over time-especially in those with combined vaccine and infection-induced immunity ("hybrid" immunity)-and may contribute to continued protection against severe disease. FUNDING: Department for Health and Social Care, Medical Research Council.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines , BNT162 Vaccine , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Health Personnel , Immunity, Humoral
13.
Iranian journal of public health ; 51(9):1950-1963, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2227468

ABSTRACT

Medical tourism is a new form of tourism grown significantly in recent years across the world and in Iran. The flow of medical tourism today is from developed countries to developing countries. Yet, demand volatility due to systematic risks can hurt industry players. The occurrence of systematic risks in the tourism industry, especially medical tourism, is common. The latest case of systemic risk is the COVID19 pandemic. The present study aimed to detect and study the factors that can help companies to be more resilient in the occurrence of systematic risks in the medical tourism industry. The Delphi method was used to summarize and analyze the industry managers' perception of the above factors. The results of analyzing the perceptions of managers of companies operating in the medical tourism industry show that debt advantage, liquidity and profitability, and operational efficiency are the determinants that play the most important role in the resilience of companies against systematic risks. The role of advertising is also relatively agreed upon by the managers.

14.
Life Sci ; 255: 117831, 2020 Aug 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267781

ABSTRACT

A new SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) belonging to the genus Betacoronavirus has caused a pandemic known as COVID-19. Among coronaviruses, the main protease (Mpro) is an essential drug target which, along with papain-like proteases catalyzes the processing of polyproteins translated from viral RNA and recognizes specific cleavage sites. There are no human proteases with similar cleavage specificity and therefore, inhibitors are highly likely to be nontoxic. Therefore, targeting the SARS-CoV-2 Mpro enzyme with small molecules can block viral replication. The present study is aimed at the identification of promising lead molecules for SARS-CoV-2 Mpro enzyme through virtual screening of antiviral compounds from plants. The binding affinity of selected small drug-like molecules to SARS-CoV-2 Mpro, SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro were studied using molecular docking. Bonducellpin D was identified as the best lead molecule which shows higher binding affinity (-9.28 kcal/mol) as compared to the control (-8.24 kcal/mol). The molecular binding was stabilized through four hydrogen bonds with Glu166 and Thr190 as well as hydrophobic interactions via eight residues. The SARS-CoV-2 Mpro shows identities of 96.08% and 50.65% to that of SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro respectively at the sequence level. At the structural level, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and SARS-CoV Mpro was found to be 0.517 Å and 0.817 Å between SARS-CoV-2 Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro. Bonducellpin D exhibited broad-spectrum inhibition potential against SARS-CoV Mpro and MERS-CoV Mpro and therefore is a promising drug candidate, which needs further validations through in vitro and in vivo studies.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Betacoronavirus/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Plant Extracts/pharmacology , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors , Amino Acid Sequence , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Binding Sites , COVID-19 , Computer Simulation , Coronavirus 3C Proteases , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cysteine Endopeptidases/chemistry , Cysteine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Drug Evaluation, Preclinical/methods , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Protease Inhibitors/chemistry , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2 , Small Molecule Libraries/pharmacology , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/chemistry , Viral Nonstructural Proteins/metabolism , Virus Replication/drug effects
15.
Trop Anim Health Prod ; 55(1): 60, 2023 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2220179

ABSTRACT

The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has caused a large global outbreak. The reports of domestic animals' infection with SARS-CoV-2 raise concerns about the virus's longer-lasting spread, the establishment of a new host reservoir, or even the evolution of a new virus, as seen with COVID-19. In this review, we focus on the susceptibility of domestic animals, especially companion animals, towards SARS-CoV-2 in light of existing studies of natural infection, experimental infection, and serological surveys. Susceptibility of domestic and companion animals to SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Pets , Disease Outbreaks
16.
J Educ Health Promot ; 11: 358, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2201892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: One of the most important sensory disorders that usually occur after viral infections, especially human coronaviruses and rhinoviruses, is anosmia or loss of olfactory sense. The aim of the present study was to investigate olfactory disorders in children with COVID-19 disease admitted to Hazrat Masoumeh Hospital in Qom. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 85 children admitted to Hazrat Masoumeh Hospital in Qom by using a convenience random sampling method. Data were collected using a checklist containing demographic data. The collected data were entered SPSS 18 software and were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics. RESULTS: In the present study, the results showed that the mean age of participants was 6.59 ± 3.27 years and more patients were Iranian (n = 69, 87.3%), had a history of underlying disease (n = 51, 64.6%), had a history of vaccination (n = 78, 98.7%), and did not have contact with a suspected patient (n = 43, 54.4%). Among the signs and symptoms of the disease, only the symptoms of fever (n = 71, 89.9%), weakness and lethargy (n = 44, 55.7%), and anorexia (n = 44, 55.7%) were observed in most patients. Moreover, 87.3% (n = 69) of the patients did not have olfactory. Furthermore, no association was found between age (P = 0.803), length of hospital stay (P = 0.397), white blood cell (P = 0.624), lymph (P = 0.638), Polymorphonuclear (PMN) (P = 0.493), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (P = 0.507), C-reactive protein (P = 0.085), and O2sat (P = 0.205) and olfactory disorders, but a significant relationship was found between patient weight (P = 0.002) and olfactory disorders. CONCLUSION: According to the results of the study, it can be said that in order to increase the strength of the immune system of children, especially overweight children, appropriate and planned action should be taken to prevent problems in these children.

17.
PLOS Glob Public Health ; 2(11): e0001300, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196838

ABSTRACT

Lockdown has been recognized as a gold standard measure to limit COVID-19 infection among the general population; however, it has a deleterious impact on their mental well-being. Many studies measured the mental well-being of different population groups during the lockdown period. Nonetheless, very little is known about the mental well-being of the general population when the lockdown has been relaxed or withdrawn in a particular country. Our study aimed to measure the mental well-being of the general population when the lockdown was lifted in Bangladesh. A cross-sectional survey was conducted from December 1, 2020, to February 28, 2021, using both web-based data collection and in-person interview facilities. Data from 3035 general Bangladeshi aged 18 and above were analyzed. Mental well-being was measured using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) (Registration ID: 518226001). A multivariable linear regression model was employed to find the influential variables after controlling the confounders. The mean well-being score was 43.66. Well-being score was significantly lower among women (slope -2.171, p = <0.001), low-educated (slope -2.485, p = 0.018), and currently not working (slope -2.263, p = <0.001) population. However, we found significantly higher mental well-being scores among those with no comorbidity (slope 3.436, p = <0.001). Though the withdrawal of the lockdown improved the overall mental well-being of the general population, women, low-educated, not working, and the comorbid population were still suffering from low mental well-being problems. Special attention is recommended to address the vulnerable population when discussing the mental health of adult Bangladeshi during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
Health science reports ; 6(1), 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2147651

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim The COVID‐19 pandemic has plagued our lives for more than 2 years, and the preference for convalescent plasma (CP) as a life‐saving treatment since CP has proven as a potential therapeutic option for acute COVID‐19 patients who were suffering from severe disease. It is important to identify which factors are associated with plasma donation. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the associated factors for CP donation to COVID‐19 patients. Methods A cross‐sectional study was conducted online from December 21, 2021 to February 15, 2022 to identify different socio‐demographic factors and knowledge related to CP donation. People who recovered from the COVID‐19 infections and those who are willing to participate were included in the study. A total of 60 participants were included in the study. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation matrix, and factor analysis. Results The analysis results confirm that 41.67% (n = 25) of the participants aged 26–30 years;among the recovered patients, only about 23% (n = 14) of the participants donated plasma. Though 97% (n = 58) of the participants agreed to donate plasma when it will be needed, however, when someone asked to donate plasma then 76.67% (n = 46) of the patients declined it. Findings depict that gender had a weak positive relationship with ever decline in plasma donation at 5% level of significance and the age of the participants inversely related to plasma donation. Conclusion Almost all the recovered participants were willing to donate plasma, however, due to a lack of knowledge and misconception, relatively few people actually did. This study reemphasizes the importance of health education to overcome the misconception about plasma donation, which is crucial for the treatment of COVID‐19 infection.

19.
Health Sci Rep ; 6(1): e974, 2023 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148328

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has plagued our lives for more than 2 years, and the preference for convalescent plasma (CP) as a life-saving treatment since CP has proven as a potential therapeutic option for acute COVID-19 patients who were suffering from severe disease. It is important to identify which factors are associated with plasma donation. Therefore, this study aimed to assess the associated factors for CP donation to COVID-19 patients. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted online from December 21, 2021 to February 15, 2022 to identify different socio-demographic factors and knowledge related to CP donation. People who recovered from the COVID-19 infections and those who are willing to participate were included in the study. A total of 60 participants were included in the study. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation matrix, and factor analysis. Results: The analysis results confirm that 41.67% (n = 25) of the participants aged 26-30 years; among the recovered patients, only about 23% (n = 14) of the participants donated plasma. Though 97% (n = 58) of the participants agreed to donate plasma when it will be needed, however, when someone asked to donate plasma then 76.67% (n = 46) of the patients declined it. Findings depict that gender had a weak positive relationship with ever decline in plasma donation at 5% level of significance and the age of the participants inversely related to plasma donation. Conclusion: Almost all the recovered participants were willing to donate plasma, however, due to a lack of knowledge and misconception, relatively few people actually did. This study reemphasizes the importance of health education to overcome the misconception about plasma donation, which is crucial for the treatment of COVID-19 infection.

20.
Pain Rep ; 7(6): e1051, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135798

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Headache is one of the significant global public health concerns. Furthermore, it is a standard feature of patients with acute and postacute COVID-19. Objectives: This study aimed to estimate and compare the prevalence of headaches among postacute COVID and non-COVID individuals and identify and contrast the risk factors between both groups. Methods: This was a multicenter case-control study. Individuals who had recovered from acute SARS-CoV-2 infection were considered "case", and those who never tested positive for COVID-19 were considered "control." Headaches were measured using the musculoskeletal subscale of the subjective health complaints scale. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of headaches. Results: A total of 878 individuals (439 cases) aged 38.30 ± 12.77 years (mean ± standard deviation) participated in this study. The prevalence of headaches was 26.2% among COVID-19 survivors; however, only 10.7% of unaffected participants reported headaches at the same time. Regression analyses suggested that the recovery duration from acute COVID-19 ≤ 90 days (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.03, CI = 1.13-3.65) was the only predictor of headache among postacute COVID-19 survivors. However, the female gender (AOR = 3.09, 95% CI = 1.51-6.32), members of a joint family (AOR = 1.99, 95% CI = 1.02-3.90), and city dwellers (AOR = 2.43, 95% CI = 0.94-6.25) were the predictor of headache among non-COVID participants. Conclusion: This study found a higher prevalence of headaches among COVID-19 survivors. In addition, predictors of headache among cases and controls were unmatched, indicating heterogenous impact of COVID-19 on human health. The health care providers should be informed of the study's results when discussing better practices to mitigate the burden of headaches.

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