Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 5 de 5
Filter
1.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 17(1): 129-134, 2023 01 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20242325

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common nosocomial infections with different clinical and microbiological characteristics. We studied these characteristics in critically ill patients. METHODOLOGY: This research was a cross-sectional study conducted on intensive care unit (ICU) patients with CAUTI. Patients' demographic and clinical information and laboratory data, including causative microorganisms and antibiotic susceptibility tests, were recorded and analyzed. Finally, the differences between the patients who survived and died were compared. RESULTS: After reviewing 353 ICU cases, 80 patients with CAUTI were finally included in the study. The mean age was 55.9 ± 19.1 years, 43.7% were male and 56.3% were female. The mean length of infection development since hospitalisation and hospital stay were 14.7 (3-90) and 27.8 (5-98) days, respectively. The most common symptom was fever (80%). The microbiological identification showed that the most isolated microorganisms were Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Enterobacteriaceae (75%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.8%), Gram-positive uropathogens (8.8%) and Acinetobacter baumannii (5%). Fifteen patients (18.8%) died among whom infections with A. baumannii (75%) and P. aeruginosa (57.1%) were associated with more death (p = 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: Although A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa can be the most important pathogens for death, MDR Enterobacteriaceae are still a serious concern as causes of CAUTIs.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter baumannii , Cross Infection , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Iran/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Critical Illness , Cross Infection/microbiology , Catheters , Pseudomonas aeruginosa , Intensive Care Units , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial
2.
J Clin Pharm Ther ; 2022 Aug 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001674

ABSTRACT

WHAT IS KNOWN AND OBJECTIVE: Although antibiotics are ineffective against viral infections, epidemiological studies have revealed that the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the overuse of antibiotics and disruption of antimicrobial stewardship programmes. We investigated the pattern of antibiotic use during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran. METHODS: A multi-centre retrospective study was designed to investigate the use of 16 broad-spectrum antibiotics in 12 medical centres. The rate of antibiotic use was calculated and reported based on the Defined Daily Dose (DDD) per 100 hospital bed-days. The bacterial co-infection rate was also reported. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Totally, 43,791 hospitalized COVID-19 patients were recruited in this study. It was found that 121.6 DDD of antibiotics were used per 100 hospital bed-days, which estimated that each patient received approximately 1.21 DDDs of antibiotics every day. However, the bacterial co-infections were detected only in 14.4% of the cases. A direct correlation was observed between the rate of antibiotic use and mortality (r[142] = 0.237, p = 0.004). The rate of antibiotic consumption was not significantly different between the ICU and non-ICU settings (p = 0.15). WHAT IS NEW AND CONCLUSION: In this study, widespread antibiotic use was detected in the absence of the confirmed bacterial coinfection in COVID-19 patients. This over-consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics may be associated with increased mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, which can be an alarming finding.

3.
Int J Surg Case Rep ; 95: 107202, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1945226

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND IMPORTANCE: Nontyphoidal Salmonella infection can lead to gastroenteritis, enteric fever, and bacteremia. However, joint infections due to this bacterium are rare, and usually associated with immunosuppressive disorders. CASE PRESENTATION: A 16-year-old girl, with a recent history of acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) presented with bacteremia, and bilateral hip pain after COVID-19 symptoms. Clinical presentation, laboratory features and imaging showed bilateral nontyphoidal Salmonella septic arthritis. We administered antibiotics, based on antibiotics susceptibility pattern of the isolated Salmonella. CLINICAL DISCUSSION: The case is presented because reports of bilateral hip joint infection due to nontyphoidal Salmonella are rare especially after COVID-19. When the patient presents with joint discomfort, the clinician should think infection especially in immunocompromised hosts. CONCLUSION: It illustrates successful management of septic arthritis requires prompt clinical diagnosis, microorganism identification, administration of appropriate systemic antibiotics and hip joint surgery.

4.
Curr Med Mycol ; 7(2): 39-42, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1836137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a significant clinical challenge in healthcare settings all over the world. Critically ill COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome may be at increased risk of co-infection with pulmonary aspergillosis. This study aimed to describe a clinical case of proven pulmonary aspergillosis caused by Aspergillus tubingensis in a 59-year-old man with a history of hospitalization due to COVID-19 infection. CASE REPORT: The Covid-19 infection was confirmed by positive nasopharyngeal polymerase chain reaction. He had a cavitary lesion measured 20 mm in diameter with intracavitary soft tissue density in the left lung in the first chest computerized tomography scan. After 25 days, he showed two cavitary lesions in both lungs which raised suspicion of fungal infection; hence, the patient underwent a trans-thoracic biopsy of the cavitary lesion. The direct examination and culture of the biopsy material revealed Aspergillus species. To confirm the Aspergillus species identification, the beta-tubulin region was sequenced. The patient was treated with oral voriconazole. CONCLUSION: This report underlined the importance of early diagnosis and management of invasive fungal infections in severe COVID-19 patients.

5.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 927, 2021 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403227

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) is among the most concerning cause of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) due to its high level of antibiotic resistance and high mortality. In the era of the COVID-19 pandemic, the key priority of infection control committees is to contain the dissemination of antibiotic resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we aimed to timely recognize the emergence of CRAB in COVID-19 cases admitted to the wards of a tertiary referral hospital and to identify the genetic relatedness of the isolates. METHODS: From 30 March to 30 May 2020, a total of 242 clinical samples from COVID-19 cases were screened for CRAB isolates using standard microbiologic and antibiotic susceptibility tests. The PCRs targeting oxa23, oxa24, oxa58, blaTEM and blaNDM-1 genes were performed. Two multiplex PCRs for identifying the global clones (GC) of A. baumannii were also performed. The sequence type of CRABs was determined using Institut Pasteur (IP) multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme. RESULTS: Eighteen CRAB isolates were recovered from COVID-19 patients with the mean age of 63.94 ± 13.8 years. All but 4 COVID-19 patients co-infected with CRAB were suffering from an underlying disease. Death was recorded as the outcome in ICUs for 9 (50%) COVID-19 patients co-infected with CRAB. The CRAB isolates belong to GC2 and ST2IP and carried the oxa23 carbapenem resistance gene. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrated the co-infection of CRAB isolates and SARS-CoV-2 in the patients admitted to different ICUs at a referral hospital in Tehran. The CRAB isolates were found to belong to ST2IP, share the oxa23 gene and to have caused several outbreaks in the wards admitting COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections , COVID-19 , Coinfection , Acinetobacter Infections/epidemiology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/genetics , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/microbiology , Carbapenems/pharmacology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Multilocus Sequence Typing , Pandemics , Tertiary Care Centers , beta-Lactamases/genetics
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL