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1.
Rev Clin Esp (Barc) ; 222(8): 468-478, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095943

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Various studies have identified factors associated with risk of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their sample size has often been limited and their results partially contradictory. This study evaluated factors associated with COVID-19 mortality in the population of Madrid over 75 years of age, in infected patients, and in hospitalized patients up to January 2021. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This population-based cohort study analyzed all residents of the Community of Madrid born before January 1, 1945 who were alive as of December 31, 2019. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from primary care electronic medical records (PC-Madrid), data on hospital admissions from the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD, Minimum Data Set), and data on mortality from the Índice Nacional de Defunciones (INDEF, National Death Index). Data on SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, and death were collected from March 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021. RESULTS: A total of 587,603 subjects were included in the cohort. Of them, 41,603 (7.1%) had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, of which 22,362 (53.7% of the infected individuals) were hospitalized and 11,251 (27%) died. Male sex and age were the factors most closely associated with mortality, though many comorbidities also had an influence. The associations were stronger in the analysis of the total population than in the analysis of infected or hospitalized patients. Mortality among hospitalized patients was lower during the second wave (33.4%) than during the first wave (41.2%) of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Age, sex, and numerous comorbidities are associated with risk of death due to COVID-19. Mortality in hospitalized patients declined notably after the first wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Cohort Studies , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Pandemics
2.
Cytotherapy ; 24(5):S111-S112, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1996727

ABSTRACT

Background & Aim: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. The vaccines had dramatically decreased infection rates, number of deaths, and hospitalizations, but they are not 100% effective and immunity is lost gradually over time. We have previously shown how we are able to detect, isolate and produce at clinical scale SARS-CoV-2-specific T cells within CD45RA-memory T cells from COVID-19 convalescent donors. In a phase I clinical trial we have proved that treatment with these cells of hospitalized patients with moderate/severe COVID-19 is safe and feasible. Understanding the durability and the level of cellular immunity within the CD45RA- memory T cells and how changes with immunization are critical for the development of a biobank of living drugs to treat future COVID-19 patients. We performed a longitudinal exploratory analysis of the SARS-CoV-2 specific humoral and cellular immunity within the memory CD45RA- T cells in naive and previously infected individuals at different time points after two doses of BNT162b2 BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine Methods, Results & Conclusion: We studied the cellular and humoral response of SARS-CoV-2 specific memory T cells from recovered patients and controls at different time points: 2 weeks after recovering from COVID-19, 9 months after the infection/just before mRNA immunization, 10 and 65 days after full immunization. Detection of SARSCoV- 2- Specific Memory T Cells was performed by IFNg assay after exposure of cells to the M, N, and S SARS-CoV-2 peptides. Our data shows that memory T cell responses within the CD45RA- memory T cell subpopulation and most of the subsets tend to be higher in recovered individuals at all time points. The cellular response produced by control individuals to the S peptide is like the one from recovered patients at the same time point. Humoral responses were higher in recovered individuals after full immunization. Antibodies titer was not boosted after the late vaccine time point. An exploratory analysis of non-parametric Spearman’s rho correlation of humoral and cellular responses shows a positive correlation after infection with the 3 peptides and 65 days after immunization. In conclusion: We have analyzed the SARS-COV-2 specific T cells within the CD45RA- memory T cell subpopulation and the different subsets at different time points after (Figure Presented) (Figure Presented) infection and fully vaccinated. We claim that the best donors would be immunized individuals recovered from COVID-19 ideally in a time frame not higher than 6 months.

3.
Revista clinica espanola ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1989836

ABSTRACT

Objective Various studies have identified factors associated with risk of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their sample size has often been limited and their results partially contradictory. This study evaluated factors associated with COVID-19 mortality in the population of Madrid over 75 years of age, in infected patients, and in hospitalized patients up to January 2021. Patients and Methods This population-based cohort study analyzed all residents of the Community of Madrid born before January 1, 1945 who were alive as of December 31, 2019. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from primary care electronic medical records (PC-Madrid), data on hospital admissions from the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD, Minimum Data Set), and data on mortality from the Índice Nacional de Defunciones (INDEF, National Death Index). Data on SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, and death were collected from March 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021. Results A total of 587,603 subjects were included in the cohort. Of them, 41,603 (7.1%) had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, of which 22,362 (53.7% of the infected individuals) were hospitalized and 11,251 (27%) died. Male sex and age were the factors most closely associated with mortality, though many comorbidities also had an influence. The associations were stronger in the analysis of the total population than in the analysis of infected or hospitalized patients. Mortality among hospitalized patients was lower during the second wave (33.4%) than during the first wave (41.2%) of the pandemic. Conclusion Age, sex, and numerous comorbidities are associated with risk of death due to COVID-19. Mortality in hospitalized patients declined notably after the first wave of the pandemic.

4.
Rev Clin Esp ; 222(8): 468-478, 2022 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1900112

ABSTRACT

Objective: Various studies have identified factors associated with risk of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. However, their sample size has often been limited and their results partially contradictory. This study evaluated factors associated with COVID-19 mortality in the population of Madrid over 75 years of age, in infected patients, and in hospitalized patients up to January 2021. Patients and methods: This population-based cohort study analyzed all residents of the Community of Madrid born before January 1, 1945 who were alive as of December 31, 2019. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from primary care electronic medical records (PC-Madrid), data on hospital admissions from the Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD, Minimum Data Set), and data on mortality from the Índice Nacional de Defunciones (INDEF, National Death Index). Data on SARS-CoV-2 infection, hospitalization, and death were collected from March 1, 2020 to January 31, 2021. Results: A total of 587,603 subjects were included in the cohort. Of them, 41,603 (7.1%) had confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection, of which 22,362 (53.7% of the infected individuals) were hospitalized and 11,251 (27%) died. Male sex and age were the factors most closely associated with mortality, though many comorbidities also had an influence. The associations were stronger in the analysis of the total population than in the analysis of infected or hospitalized patients. Mortality among hospitalized patients was lower during the second wave (33.4%) than during the first wave (41.2%) of the pandemic. Conclusion: Age, sex, and numerous comorbidities are associated with risk of death due to COVID-19. Mortality in hospitalized patients declined notably after the first wave of the pandemic.

6.
Cytotherapy (Elsevier Inc.) ; 24(5):S111-S112, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1783862
7.
Giovanetti, M.; Slavov, S. N.; Fonseca, V.; Wilkinson, E.; Tegally, H.; Patané, J. S. L.; Viala, V. L.; San, J. E.; Rodrigues, E. S.; Vieira Santos, E.; Aburjaile, F.; Xavier, J.; Fritsch, H.; Ribeiro Adelino, T. E.; Pereira, F.; Leal, A.; Campos de Melo Iani, F.; de Carvalho Pereira, G.; Vazquez, C.; Mercedes Estigarribia Sanabria, G.; de Oliveira, E. C.; Demarchi, L.; Croda, J.; Dos Santos Bezerra, R.; Oliveira de Lima, L. P.; Martins, A. J.; Dos Santos Barros, C. R.; Marqueze, E. C.; de Souza Todao Bernardino, J.; Moretti, D. B.; Brassaloti, R. A.; de Lello Rocha Campos Cassano, R.; Drummond Sampaio Corrêa Mariani, P.; Kitajima, J. P.; Santos, B.; Proto-Siqueira, R.; Cantarelli, V. V.; Tosta, S.; Brandão Nardy, V.; Reboredo de Oliveira da Silva, L.; Astete Gómez, M. K.; Lima, J. G.; Ribeiro, A. A.; Guimarães, N. R.; Watanabe, L. T.; Barbosa Da Silva, L.; da Silva Ferreira, R.; MP, F. da Penha, Ortega, M. J.; Gómez de la Fuente, A.; Villalba, S.; Torales, J.; Gamarra, M. L.; Aquino, C.; Martínez Figueredo, G. P.; Fava, W. S.; Motta-Castro, A. R. C.; Venturini, J.; do Vale Leone de Oliveira, S. M.; Cavalheiro Maymone Gonçalves, C.; Debur Rossa, M. D. C.; Becker, G. N.; Presibella, M. M.; Marques, N. Q.; Riediger, I. N.; Raboni, S.; Coelho, G. M.; Cataneo, A. H. D.; Zanluca, C.; Dos Santos, C. N. D.; Assato, P. A.; Allan da Silva da Costa, F.; Poleti, M. D.; Chagas Lesbon, J. C.; Mattos, E. C.; Banho, C. A.; Sacchetto, L.; Moraes, M. M.; Tommasini Grotto, R. M.; Souza-Neto, J. A.; Nogueira, M. L.; Fukumasu, H.; Coutinho, L. L.; Calado, R. T.; Neto, R. M.; Bispo de Filippis, A. M.; Venancio da Cunha, R.; Freitas, C.; Leonel Peterka, C. R.; Rangel Fernandes, C. F.; de Araújo, W. N.; do Carmo Said, R. F.; Almiron, M.; Campelo de Albuquerque, E. Melo C. F.; Lourenço, J.; de Oliveira, T.; Holmes, E. C.; Haddad, R.; Sampaio, S. C.; Elias, M. C.; Kashima, S.; de Alcantara, L. C. J.; Covas, D. T..
PubMed; 2022.
Preprint in English | PubMed | ID: ppcovidwho-332259

ABSTRACT

Brazil has experienced some of the highest numbers of COVID-19 cases and deaths globally and from May 2021 made Latin America a pandemic epicenter. Although SARS-CoV-2 established sustained transmission in Brazil early in the pandemic, important gaps remain in our understanding of virus transmission dynamics at the national scale. Here, we describe the genomic epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 using near-full genomes sampled from 27 Brazilian states and a bordering country - Paraguay. We show that the early stage of the pandemic in Brazil was characterised by the co-circulation of multiple viral lineages, linked to multiple importations predominantly from Europe, and subsequently characterized by large local transmission clusters. As the epidemic progressed under an absence of effective restriction measures, there was a local emergence and onward international spread of Variants of Concern (VOC) and Variants Under Monitoring (VUM), including Gamma (P.1) and Zeta (P.2). In addition, we provide a preliminary genomic overview of the epidemic in Paraguay, showing evidence of importation from Brazil. These data reinforce the usefulness and need for the implementation of widespread genomic surveillance in South America as a toolkit for pandemic monitoring that provides a means to follow the real-time spread of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants with possible implications for public health and immunization strategies.

8.
Archivos Latinoamericanos de Nutricion ; 70(3):215-234, 2020.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1267072

ABSTRACT

The impact of the pandemic caused by COVID-19 may deepen the situations of malnutrition, where it will be necessary to adapt food programs to this new context. The objective of this work was to present the methodology and the main results of the process of formulating a federal guide based on scientific evidence and adapted to the reality of the child and adolescent population that attend school canteens in the 24 jurisdictions of Argentina. It was observed that the modalities for the implementation of SC during the pandemic were: food modules (the most frequent);food modules delivered at school with regular SC support and, food and/or snacks delivered daily. There was little evidence at the global and regional level on specific recommendations applied to the implementation of SC, although recommendations on hygiene and food handling were found. Based on a participatory process among key actors, specific recommendations were obtained according to the dimensions of food and nutrition security (FNS). It is concluded that it is necessary to increase participatory experiences in the design of recommendations based on evidence, adapted to the territory and that assume a comprehensive approach from the dimensions of FNS. Arch Latinoam Nutr 2020;70(3): 215-234. © 2020 Archivos Latinoamericanos Nutricion. All rights reserved.

9.
Medicina Paliativa ; 27(3):164-170, 2020.
Article in Spanish | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1006768

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has spread rapidly around the world, resulting in high mortality;it has forced a reorganization of all health systems. The Palliative Care Unit at Hospital Universitario La Paz was transformed into a unit for the care of patients with COVID-19 infection in order to collaborate in the care of these patients. We faced the challenge of ensuring good control of symptoms, which were assessed as systematically as possible, being aware of the difficulties entailed in the context of the isolation and clinical situation of patients. We present a narrative review of symptomatic manifestations and our experience as a palliative care unit integrated in COVID-19 care at a third-level hospital in Madrid. A profile of patients with advanced disease and high comorbidity was prioritized for admission in this unit. This integration contributed significantly to having a greater influence on the way end-of-life care is provided throughout the hospital. Palliative care should be part of the care teams in any health emergency, such as a pandemic. It is essential for adequate symptomatology and end-of-life care. A systematic collection of symptoms is necessary because of its clinical impact on patients, their need for specific treatment, and its prognostic implications.

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