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1.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 15: 2673-2681, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562356

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Social media platforms are used by many people to seek and share health-related information that may influence their decision-making about COVID-19 vaccination. Purpose: The objective of this study is to understand the influence of social media on the attitudes and willingness of the general public of the Aseer region of Saudi Arabia to receive COVID-19 vaccination. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional self-administrated online survey was conducted in Saudi Arabia Aseer region, where 613 persons willingly took part in the survey in April and May 2021. Residents of Aseer in Saudi Arabia, who are over the age of 18 (eligible for COVID-19 vaccination) and willing to participate in the survey, were included in the study. Results: Overall, 74.6% agreed that the COVID-19 vaccine was misrepresented via social media. However, 37% of those respondents strongly agreed that social media had increased their willingness to get the COVID-19 vaccine. In addition, employees reported (21.8%) or strongly agreed (28%) that the quantity and quality of information on social media has a detrimental impact on their psychological well-being. Additionally, participants also agreed (21.8%) or strongly agreed (28%) that social media had a negative effect on their psychological condition. Conclusion: The study provides that there was a high degree of awareness indicated among Aseer population regarding misleading information about COVID-19 vaccination via social media. Thus, social media that can share up-to-date scientific information about vaccination must be utilized optimally by the government to assist people in making decisions about accepting vaccinations.

2.
Saudi Med J ; 42(4): 384-390, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513255

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To measure the Saudi population's sleep quality during the lockdown of COVID-19. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire that was performed during the lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic among the Saudi population over 2 weeks from April 1 to April 15, 2020. We used the instant messaging application WhatsApp and Twitter to reach the targeted population. Saudi citizens and non-Saudi residents who can read and understand the questionnaire were recruited. Data were analyzed using Stata and SPSS. RESULTS: A total of 790 responses were included. The majority of participants were the Saudi population 735 (92.9%). The prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality were 54.4% and 55.5%, respectively. Saudi citizenship was associated with longer sleep duration (p=0.031). Female gender and being married were associated with worse global PSQI, sleep quality, sleep distribution, sleep latency, and daytime dysfunction. CONCLUSION: Our findings showed that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Saudi population had a high prevalence of insomnia and poor sleep quality. Routine monitoring of the psychological impact of life-threatening outbreaks and the adoption of effective early mental health actions should be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Educational Status , Female , Humans , Male , Marital Status/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Public Policy , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Latency , Surveys and Questionnaires , Unemployment/statistics & numerical data
3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(8)2021 Aug 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of data on Saudi domestic air travellers' understanding regarding COVID-19 and their attitude towards the COVID-19 vaccination. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess Saudi domestic air travellers' understanding regarding COVID-19 and attitude towards mandating the COVID-19 vaccination for travellers. METHODS: A survey using a self-administered, structured, and closed-ended questionnaire was conducted among domestic air travellers in Saudi Arabia. Participants' socio-demographic information, travel history, health status, and attitudes and willingness to accept the COVID-19 vaccination were collected and analysed. RESULTS: Of the 2236 respondents who participated in the survey, 542 (24.25%) had a history of COVID-19, 803 (35.9%) were exposed to a COVID-19 case, 1425 (63.7%) were concerned about catching COVID-19 during air travel, 796 (35.6%) thought the COVID-19 vaccination should be obligatory for travellers, 1105 (49.4%) thought it should be optional, and 335 (15.0%) thought the vaccination was unnecessary. Being of the male gender (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.41, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.14-1.69), being concerned about contracting COVID-19 (aOR 1.34, 95% CI 1.12-2.10) and frequent travelling (aOR 1.40, 95% CI 1.10-3.40) were predictors of vaccination uptake. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that although domestic Saudi travellers were concerned about COVID-19 infection, vaccine hesitancy was prevalent among them.

4.
Journal of Pharmaceutical Research International ; 32(26):1-5, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-940345

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. We reported a 59-year-old Yemeni physician who was treated at home with complaints of COVID-19 symptoms. After receiving the treatment according to the COVID-19 guidelines established in Yemen, the patient made a slow recovery from 8 May 2020 to 28 May 2020. In conclusion, COVID-19 has a complicated clinical course and poor prognosis. Nevertheless, early aggressive treatment with an appropriate protocol could improve patient outcomes. However, in COVID-19, the thyroid gland plays a role in the immune system and medical professionals should consider assessing the thyroid gland in COVID-19 cases.

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