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1.
SAGE Open Med Case Rep ; 10: 2050313X221113934, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1956966

ABSTRACT

Hypercoagulability in coronavirus disease 2019 infection is already a known fact. But in this article, we have discussed a unique case where the patient had suffered from relapsing thrombus formation. This report describes the case of a patient who presented with chronic coronavirus disease 2019-induced recurrent thrombi refractory to multiple antithrombotic regimens because of multiple recurrent inflammatory flares without any evidence of chronic persistent viral infection. The patient was treated with anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory medications. Still, he had repeated episodes of right ventricular thrombus. Coronavirus disease 2019 can provoke a severe relapsing hypercoagulable state without evidence of persisting viral infection. Rebound inflammatory flares rather than viral recurrence may play a trigger.

2.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(8): e0188, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795082

ABSTRACT

To explore demographics, comorbidities, transfers, and mortality in critically ill patients with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Data were collected from a large tertiary care public hospital ICU that is part of the largest public healthcare network in the United States. PATIENTS: One-hundred thirty-seven adult (≥ 18 yr old) ICU patients admitted between March 10, 2020, and April 7, 2020, with follow-up collected through May 18, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS: Demographic, clinical, laboratory, treatment, and outcome data extracted from electronic medical records. MAIN RESULTS: The majority of patients were male (99/137; 72.3%) and older than 50 years old (108/137; 78.9%). The most reported ethnicity and race were Hispanic (61/137; 44.5%) and Black (23/137; 16.7%). One-hundred six of 137 patients had at least one comorbidity (77.4%). One-hundred twenty-one of 137 (78.1%) required mechanical ventilation of whom 30 (24.8%) moved to tracheostomy and 46 of 137 (33.6%) required new onset renal replacement therapy. Eighty-two of 137 patients (59.9%) died after a median of 8 days (interquartile range 5-15 d) in the ICU. Male sex had a trend toward a higher hazard of death (hazard ratio, 2.1 [1.1-4.0]) in the multivariable Cox model. CONCLUSIONS: We report a mortality rate of 59.9% in a predominantly Hispanic and Black patient population. A significant association between comorbidities and mortality was not found in multivariable regression, and further research is needed to study factors that impact mortality in critical coronavirus disease 2019 patients. We also describe how a public hospital developed innovative approaches to safely manage a large volume of interhospital transfers and admitted patients.

3.
J Card Fail ; 28(4): 675-681, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1627205

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute heart failure (HF) is an important complication of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has been hypothesized to relate to inflammatory activation. METHODS: We evaluated consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) admissions for COVID-19 across 6 centers in the Critical Care Cardiology Trials Network, identifying patients with vs without acute HF. Acute HF was subclassified as de novo vs acute-on-chronic, based on the absence or presence of prior HF. Clinical features, biomarker profiles and outcomes were compared. RESULTS: Of 901 admissions to an ICU due to COVID-19, 80 (8.9%) had acute HF, including 18 (2.0%) with classic cardiogenic shock (CS) and 37 (4.1%) with vasodilatory CS. The majority (n = 45) were de novo HF presentations. Compared to patients without acute HF, those with acute HF had higher cardiac troponin and natriuretic peptide levels and similar inflammatory biomarkers; patients with de novo HF had the highest cardiac troponin levels. Notably, among patients critically ill with COVID-19, illness severity (median Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, 8 [IQR, 5-10] vs 6 [4-9]; P = 0.025) and mortality rates (43.8% vs 32.4%; P = 0.040) were modestly higher in patients with vs those without acute HF. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients critically ill with COVID-19, acute HF is distinguished more by biomarkers of myocardial injury and hemodynamic stress than by biomarkers of inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiology , Heart Failure , Biomarkers , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Heart Failure/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Shock, Cardiogenic/diagnosis , Shock, Cardiogenic/epidemiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/therapy , Troponin
4.
BMC Cardiovasc Disord ; 21(1): 522, 2021 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1486551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With the high prevalence of COVID-19 infections worldwide, the multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults (MIS-A) is becoming an increasingly recognized entity. This syndrome presents in patients several weeks after infection with COVID-19 and is associated with thrombosis, elevated inflammatory markers, hemodynamic compromise and cardiac dysfunction. Treatment is often with steroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg). The pathologic basis of myocardial injury in MIS-A, however, is not well characterized. In our case report, we obtained endomyocardial biopsy that revealed a pattern of myocardial injury similar to that found in COVID-19 cardiac specimens. CASE PRESENTATION: A 26-year-old male presented with fevers, chills, headache, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea 5 weeks after his COVID-19 infection. His SARS-CoV-2 PCR was negative and IgG was positive, consistent with prior infection. He was found to be in cardiogenic shock with biventricular failure, requiring inotropes and diuretics. Given concern for acute fulminant myocarditis, an endomyocardial biopsy (EMB) was performed, showing an inflammatory infiltrate consisting predominantly of interstitial macrophages with scant T lymphocytes. The histologic pattern was similar to that of cardiac specimens from COVID-19 patients, helping rule out myocarditis as the prevailing diagnosis. His case was complicated by persistent hypoxemia, and a computed tomography scan revealed pulmonary emboli. He received IVIg, steroids, and anticoagulation with rapid recovery of biventricular function. CONCLUSIONS: MIS-A should be considered as the diagnosis in patients presenting several weeks after COVID-19 infection with severe inflammation and multi-organ involvement. In our case, EMB facilitated identification of MIS-A and guided therapy. The patient's biventricular function recovered with IVIg and steroids.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Myocarditis/diagnosis , Shock, Cardiogenic , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Adult , Biopsy/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiotonic Agents/administration & dosage , Diagnosis, Differential , Diuretics/administration & dosage , Electrocardiography/methods , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/administration & dosage , Male , Myocardium/pathology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Shock, Cardiogenic/diagnosis , Shock, Cardiogenic/drug therapy , Shock, Cardiogenic/etiology , Shock, Cardiogenic/physiopathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/physiopathology , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(1): 72-84, 2020 07 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-617527

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a major unanticipated stress on the workforce, organizational structure, systems of care, and critical resource supplies. To ensure provider safety, to maximize efficiency, and to optimize patient outcomes, health systems need to be agile. Critical care cardiologists may be uniquely positioned to treat the numerous respiratory and cardiovascular complications of the SARS-CoV-2 and support clinicians without critical care training who may be suddenly asked to care for critically ill patients. This review draws upon the experiences of colleagues from heavily impacted regions of the United States and Europe, as well as lessons learned from military mass casualty medicine. This review offers pragmatic suggestions on how to implement scalable models for critical care delivery, cultivate educational tools for team training, and embrace technologies (e.g., telemedicine) to enable effective collaboration despite social distancing imperatives.


Subject(s)
Cardiology Service, Hospital , Coronavirus Infections , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Cardiology Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Cardiology Service, Hospital/trends , Civil Defense/methods , Civil Defense/organization & administration , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Critical Care/organization & administration , Critical Care/trends , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Humans , Organizational Objectives , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
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