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1.
Jordan Journal of Biological Sciences ; 15(2):159-164, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1893782

ABSTRACT

Occurrence of cardiac arrhythmias in COVID-19 patients with myocardial injuries is common, and it is potentially a lifethreatening complication. The current study presents the published literature on cardiac arrhythmia occurrence in COVID-19 patients during 2020. We aimed to evaluate the association among cardiac arrhythmias, acute cardiac injury, and disease severity. Databases, including PubMed, Science Direct, and Scopus, were searched to find studies describing subjects with cardiac arrhythmias and COVID-19. In this study, we recruited 4,355 patients with COVID-19, collected from 13 studies. Relevant data were manually extracted and compared among two groups: arrhythmia as a complication of COVID-19 and cardiac injury as a complication of COVID-19. The pooled prevalence of cardiac arrhythmia was 19% (95%CI: 12% to 29%), compared to 9% (95%CI: 5% to 18%) in acute cardiac injury. Compared to patients without arrhythmias, the probability of developing severe symptoms was increased by ten folds in patients with arrhythmias. In addition, acute cardiac injury significantly increased the severity of COVID-19 by nearly 15-folds. No significant publication bias was indicated by either the visual symmetry or the Egger’s test. In conclusion, the incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and acute cardiac injury is highly associated with the severity and the mortality rate of COVID-19. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Jordan Journal of Biological Sciences is the property of Hashemite University and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
Obes Med ; 33: 100431, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1882404

ABSTRACT

Background: The literature on COVID-19 infection is growing every single day, and evidence of presence or absence of association between obesity and COVID-19 adverse outcomes should be revisited. Therefore, this study summarizes the pooled association of obesity with COVID-19 adverse outcomes and mortality. Methods: We searched PubMed and Science direct databases using specific terms and defined criteria. Data were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis V2 (Biostat, Englewood, NJ, USA)) random-effect models were used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of infection severity and mortality associated with obesity. Results: Results revealed that obesity is not associated with COVID-19 mortality (OR = 1.1; 95%CI: 0.8 to 1.3) but with other adverse outcomes (OR = 2.4; 95%CI: 1.7 to 3.3). Conclusion: Our findings support previous findings that obesity is associated with COVID-19 severity.

3.
Osong Public Health Res Perspect ; 13(1): 37-50, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732597

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities, including hypertension and coronary heart disease, with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) severity and mortality. METHODS: PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Scopus were searched between January 1, 2020, and July 18, 2020, to identify eligible studies. Random-effect models were used to estimate the pooled event rates of pre-existing cardiovascular disease comorbidities and odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) of disease severity and mortality associated with the exposures of interest. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies involving 19,156 patients with COVID-19 infection met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease in the included studies was 14.0%. Pre-existing cardiovascular disease in COVID-19 patients was associated with severe outcomes (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 5.7) and mortality (OR, 6.1; 95% CI, 2.9 to 12.7). Hypertension and coronary heart disease increased the risk of severe outcomes by 2.6 times (OR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.9 to 3.6) and 2.5 times (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.7 to 3.8), respectively. No significant publication bias was indicated. Conclusion: COVID-19 patients with pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities have a higher risk of severe outcomes and mortality. Awareness of pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidity is important for the early management of COVID-19.

4.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(26): e0053221, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343948

ABSTRACT

A variant of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) from Jordan was identified during the second wave of infection. The genome of this variant has a unique set of mutations that suggest local evolution. Due to the continuous emergence of new variants worldwide, molecular surveillance is crucial for fighting the pandemic.

5.
Genes (Basel) ; 12(7)2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1308328

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has quickly developed into a worldwide pandemic. Mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 genome may affect various aspects of the disease including fatality ratio. In this study, 553,518 SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences isolated from patients from continents for the period 1 December 2020 to 15 March 2021 were comprehensively analyzed and a total of 82 mutations were identified concerning the reference sequence. In addition, associations between the mutations and the case fatality ratio (CFR), cases per million and deaths per million, were examined. The mutations having the highest frequencies among different continents were Spike_D614G and NSP12_P323L. Among the identified mutations, NSP2_T153M, NSP14_I42V and Spike_L18F mutations showed a positive correlation to CFR. While the NSP13_Y541C, NSP3_T73I and NSP3_Q180H mutations demonstrated a negative correlation to CFR. The Spike_D614G and NSP12_P323L mutations showed a positive correlation to deaths per million. The NSP3_T1198K, NS8_L84S and NSP12_A97V mutations showed a significant negative correlation to deaths per million. The NSP12_P323L and Spike_D614G mutations showed a positive correlation to the number of cases per million. In contrast, NS8_L84S and NSP12_A97V mutations showed a negative correlation to the number of cases per million. In addition, among the identified clades, none showed a significant correlation to CFR. The G, GR, GV, S clades showed a significant positive correlation to deaths per million. The GR and S clades showed a positive correlation to number of cases per million. The clades having the highest frequencies among continents were G, followed by GH and GR. These findings should be taken into consideration during epidemiological surveys of the virus and vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/mortality , Mutation , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Viral Proteins/genetics , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
6.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 77(3): 311-322, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211798

ABSTRACT

The emerging coronavirus disease (COVID-19) swept the world, affecting more than 200 countries and territories. As of August 22, 2020, the pandemic infected more than 23,329,752 including 807,054 patients who have died. Although the main clinical features of the pandemic disease are respiratory, cerebrovascular comorbidities emerged as one of the leading causes of death associated with COVID-19. Different case reports have indicated that C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer (pro-inflammatory biomarkers) were elevated in COVID-19 patients, which can significantly increase the risk of ischemic stroke. Available data on cerebrovascular complications in COVID-19 patients were collected and a meta-analysis was designed and carried out to evaluate the risk of severity and mortality associated with high levels of CRP and D-dimer levels in COVID-19 patients. In addition, we aimed to describe the overall event rate of pre-existing cerebrovascular disease in COVID-19 patients. In our analysis, 5,614 cases have been studied, out of these patients 164 cases have developed cerebrovascular comorbities. Cerebrovascular comorbidity increased the risk of disease severity (odd ratio = 4.4; 95% CI: 1.48 to 12.84) and mortality (odd ratio = 7.0; 95% CI: 2.56 to 18.99). Statistical analyses showed that CRP and D-dimer serum levels were elevated by six-folds in the severe cases of COVID-19 patients. This significant increase in these two proteins levels can serve as a vital indicator for COVID-19 patients who are at increased risk of severe COVID-19 cerebrovascular complications, such as stroke.


Subject(s)
C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Cerebrovascular Disorders/blood , Cerebrovascular Disorders/virology , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/pathology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
7.
Int J Risk Saf Med ; 31(3): 111-116, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-442989

ABSTRACT

The emerging COVID-19 pandemic poses a threat to the global health care system. Given the lack of antiviral therapies or vaccines for the disease, the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) obtained much attention as a treatment for COVID-19. However, there are limited and uncertain clinical data to support the beneficial effect of this drug in COVID-19 treatment. HCQ has several side effects and warnings, including blindness, heart failure, and renal toxicity, even with recommended doses. For severe cases of COVID-19 or in patients with preexisting conditions, administering such a drug could be fatal, particularly when taken at high doses or in combination with other antibiotics. However, further well-designed studies that would address the optimal dose, duration of treatment, possible side effects, and long-term usage outcomes are needed to make the final decision. In this paper, we aim to discuss the risk of using HCQ in treating COVID-19 patients, including its possible side effects.


Subject(s)
Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Antimalarials/adverse effects , Antimalarials/pharmacology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/pharmacology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Pathogens ; 9(5)2020 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-141483

ABSTRACT

The emerging coronavirus disease (COVID-19) swept across the world, affecting more than 200 countries and territories. Genomic analysis suggests that the COVID-19 virus originated in bats and transmitted to humans through unknown intermediate hosts in the Wuhan seafood market, China, in December of 2019. This virus belongs to the Betacoronavirus group, the same group of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and for the similarity, it was named SARS-CoV-2. Given the lack of registered clinical therapies or vaccines, many physicians and scientists are investigating previously used clinical drugs for COVID-19 treatment. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of the CoVs origin, pathogenicity, and genomic structure, with a focus on SARS-CoV-2. Besides, we summarize the recently investigated drugs that constitute an option for COVID-19 treatment.

9.
Int J Risk Saf Med ; 31(2): 47-51, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-98445

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has infected nearly 3,582,233 individuals with 248,558 deaths since it was first identified in human populations in December 2019 in Wuhan, China. No antiviral therapies or vaccines are available for their treatment or prevention. Passive immunization PI through broadly neutralizing antibodies that bind to the specific antigens of SARS-CoV 2 might be a potential solution to address the immediate health threat of COVID-19 pandemic while vaccines are being developed. The PI approach in treating COVID-19 is discussed herein, including a summary of its historical applications to confront epidemics.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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