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1.
Revista Medica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social ; 60(5):556-562, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2011904

ABSTRACT

Background: Mental health is an integral part of health. Having some psychiatric condition without treatment predisposes to a poor quality of life. These alterations have been found with an incidence of up to 50% in the general population. There are very few studies in Mexico on these conditions in health workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Objective: To determine the prevalence of stress, anxiety, and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic in health workers. Material and methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional observational study was conducted on health workers in a tertiary hospital, through the application of randomized and self-completed surveys, in search of levels of stress, anxiety, and depression during the COVID-19 pandemic. Results: 44.7% of those surveyed showed depression, 83.1% anxiety, and 66.3% stress. The main groups affected were female staff, singles, and medical residents. Those with type 2 diabetes mellitus had higher anxiety and depression. Conclusion: The prevalence of stress, anxiety, and depression in health workers is similar to that of the general population in our study. Depression was the alteration most found. The scrutiny of alterations in mental health in health workers is of the utmost importance, with greater emphasis in the context of the aforementioned pandemic.

2.
Pediatric Rheumatology ; 20(SUPPL 1), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677513

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 severe pneumonia has been associated to systemic inflammation and elevation of blood parameters and reminiscent of cytokine storm syndrome. Stimulation of PBMC from patients with severe COVID-19 have shown a high secretion of IL-1β, a pivotal cytokine driving inflammatory phenotypes, which maturation and secretion is regulated by NLRP3 inflammasome. Steroidal anti-inflammatory therapies have shown efficacy in reducing mortality in critically ill patients, however the mechanisms by which SARS-CoV2 virus triggers such an extensive inflammation remain unexplained. Objectives: The overall objective of this study was to investigate if SARS-CoV2 drives inflammation in COVID-19 patients through NLRP3 inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion. Methods: Samples from SARS-CoV2 infected patients, were collected at day 0 and at 3 and 7 following treatment with anakinra. Fresh monocytes, purified through adherence, were cultured for 3, 6, 18 h in the presence or absence of LPS (100 ng/ml) and MCC950 (10μM). Release of IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, TNF-α, IL-18 was quantified by ELISA kit. Relative gene expression analysis of ORF3a gene was performed by RT-qPCR. THP-1 cells were transfected with a plasmid containing ORF3a sequence by nucleofection. NLRP3 inflammasome and ASC speck formation were detected by confocal microscopy and/or by FACS analysis. Results: In the present study we show that circulating monocytes from COVID-19 patients display ASC specks, index of NLRP3 activation, and spontaneously secrete IL-1β in vitro. This spontaneous activation reverts following patient's treatment with the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra. Transfection of a monocytic cell line with cDNA coding for the ORF3a SARS-CoV2 protein, resulted in NLRP3- dependent ASC speck formation. The involvement of ORF3a in inflammasome activation was further supported by the detection by RT-PCR of ORF3a in monocytes from COVID-19 patients. Conclusion: In summary, these results provide a mechanistic explanation for the strong inflammatory manifestations associated to COVID-19 and further evidence that NLRP3 and IL-1β targeting could represent an effective strategy in this disease.

4.
Journal of Clinical Rheumatology ; 27(SUPPL 1):S61-S62, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1368342

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To determine the risk factors, impact and outcomes of COVID-19 in autoimmune / inflammatory diseases (AID). Methods: Case (patients with AID) and controls (patients without AID) study. Both groups with SARS-CoV-2 by PCR. Clinical, biochemical, treatment and outcome characteristics were determined. Spearman correlation, X2 and multivariate analysis were performed. Results: AID, 90 (49.49 ± 14.2 years) vs controls, 90 (52.58 ± 13.5 years). AID: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (n = 20, 22.2%), systemic sclerosis (n = 16, 17.8%), rheumatoid arthritis (n = 14, 15.6%), primary antiphospholipid syndrome (n = 12, 13.3%), autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) (n = 6, 6.7%), granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) (n = 5, 5.6%) and multiple sclerosis (n = 3, 3.3%) were the most frequent. Treatment: anticoagulant 73.3%, glucocorticoid 53.3% and antimalarials 35.6%. The AID patients had less invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (p = 0.004), lower death (p = 0.006) and lower discharge with O2 (p = 0.001) (Table 1). AID: creatinine correlate positively with days with IMV (rho = 539, p 0.024). In AID, AIE and O2 saturation ≤ 88% provided risk for IMV (OR 88.42, CI 3.9-196.7, p = 0.005 and OR 10.05, CI 1.2-83.7, p = 0.033, respectively) while antimalarials were protective for IMV (OR 0.08, CI 0.0-0.9, p = 0.042). Regarding death in AID, oxygen saturation ≤ 88% and CO-RADS ≥4 were risk factors (OR 5.12, CI 1.5-16.4, p = 0.006 and OR 8.84, CI 1.2-64.0, p = 0.031, respectively) and anticoagulant use was protective (OR 0.26, CI 0.0-0.8, p = 0.019) (Table 2). Conclusion: Our study suggests that patients with AID have a better outcome than the control group. Multiple factors are involved in this outcome such as surveillance, chronic use of antimalarials, steroid and anticoagulation.We propose that at the molecular level high levels of IFN may be a protective factor for complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection. New longitudinal and molecular level studies in patients with mild/moderate, severe and critical COVID-19 will be necessary to know the impact of COVID-19 in AID.

5.
Salud Uninorte ; 37(1):162-188, 2021.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1368053

ABSTRACT

Vaccines are biological products containing antigens that aim to generate protection against real exposure to an infectious pathogen. They constitute the most cost-effective interventions in public health, being surpassed only by drinking water. Generally speaking, we can divide the vaccines into live attenuated and inactive;However, the new coronavirus has produced innovative platforms that use intracellular and molecular mechanisms with the same objective of generating immunity. A systematic literature search was carried out using the PUBMED, SCOPUS, and Web of Science electronic databases. All types of study design were selected, those written in English or Spanish were prioritized. We reviewed the existing platforms to generate immunity against the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Each one is developed according to its route and form of action, and can be classified as protein subunits, recombinant viral vector, nucleic acids, inactivated viruses, viral particles, and live attenuated viruses. The mechanisms by which these vaccines generate immunogenicity are different;however, the constant insertion of mutations by the virus remains an object of interest and concern for researchers. © 2021, Universidad del Norte. All rights reserved.

7.
Hematology, Transfusion and Cell Therapy ; 42:356, 2020.
Article in Spanish | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-892889
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