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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(27): 878-884, 2022 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924758

ABSTRACT

Immunocompromised persons are at increased risk for severe COVID-19-related outcomes, including intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death (1). Data on adults aged ≥18 years hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 from 10 U.S. states in the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET) were analyzed to assess associations between immunocompromise and ICU admission and in-hospital death during March 1, 2020-February 28, 2022. Associations of COVID-19 vaccination status with ICU admission and in-hospital death were also examined during March 1, 2021-February 28, 2022. During March 1, 2020-February 28, 2022, among a sample of 22,345 adults hospitalized for COVID-19, 12.2% were immunocompromised. Among unvaccinated patients, those with immunocompromise had higher odds of ICU admission (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.08-1.49) and in-hospital death (aOR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.05-1.70) than did nonimmunocompromised patients. Among vaccinated patients,* those with immunocompromise had higher odds of ICU admission (aOR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.01-1.92) and in-hospital death (aOR = 1.87; 95% CI = 1.28-2.75) than did nonimmunocompromised patients. During March 1, 2021-February 28, 2022, among nonimmunocompromised patients, patients who were vaccinated had lower odds of death (aOR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.39-0.86) than did unvaccinated patients; among immunocompromised patients, odds of death between vaccinated and unvaccinated patients did not differ. Immunocompromised persons need additional protection from COVID-19 and using multiple known COVID-19 prevention strategies,† including nonpharmaceutical interventions, up-to-date vaccination of immunocompromised persons and their close contacts,§ early testing, and COVID-19 prophylactic (Evusheld) and early antiviral treatment,¶ can help prevent hospitalization and subsequent severe COVID-19 outcomes among immunocompromised persons.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunocompromised Host
2.
Lancet Regional Health. Americas ; 12:100301-100301, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1904842
3.
Am J Kidney Dis ; 2022 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895612

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE: Children with kidney disease and primary hypertension may be more vulnerable to COVID-19 disease. We examined COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among parents of children with CKD or hypertension. STUDY DESIGN: Sequential explanatory mixed-methods design; survey followed by in-depth interviews. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: Parents of children <18 years with kidney disease or primary hypertension within a large pediatric practice. EXPOSURES: Parental attitudes towards general childhood and influenza vaccines assessed by the Vaccine Hesitancy Scale. Kidney disease classification, demographic and socioeconomic factors, COVID-19 disease experiences, COVID-19 mitigation activities and self-efficacy, and sources of vaccine information. OUTCOMES: Willingness to vaccinate child against COVID-19. ANALYTICAL APPROACH: ANOVA test to compare parental attitudes towards general childhood and influenza vaccination with attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination. Multinomial logistic regression to assess predictors of willingness to vaccinate against COVID-19. Thematic analysis of interview data to characterize influences on parental attitudes. RESULTS: 207 parents completed the survey (39% of approached): 75 (36%) were willing, 80 (39%) unsure, and 52 (25%) unwilling to vaccinate their child against COVID-19. Hesitancy towards general childhood and influenza vaccines was highest among the unwilling group (p<0.001). More highly educated parents more likely to be willing to vaccinate their children, while Black race was associated with being more likely to be unwilling. Rushed COVID vaccine development as well as fear of serious and unknown long-term side effects were themes that differed across the parental groups willing, unsure, or unwilling to vaccinate their children. While doctors and healthcare teams are trusted sources of vaccine information, perceptions of benefit versus harm and experiences with doctors differed among these three groups. The need for additional information on COVID-19 vaccines was greatest among those unwilling or unsure about vaccinating. LIMITATIONS: Generalizability may be limited. CONCLUSIONS: Two-thirds of parents of children with kidney disease or hypertension were unsure or unwilling to vaccinate their child against COVID-19. Higher hesitancy towards routine childhood and influenza vaccination was associated with hesitancy towards COVID-19 vaccines.. Enhanced communication of vaccine information relevant to kidney patients in an accessible manner should be examined as a means to reduce vaccine hesitancy.

4.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-337924

ABSTRACT

The United States did not respond effectively to the COVID-19 pandemic;we were not even close to the league leaders. Several narratives are getting traction in explaining how the public health system lost its way during COVID-19. The “bad leaders” narrative focuses on the incredible failings of, if not outright sabotage by, the Trump administration and its political allies. The “bad budgets” narrative attributes problems in current public health practice to decades of underinvestment.This immiseration of key sectors of the public health ecosystem, along with related structural and cultural problems, underlies the “bad institutions” narrative, which takes plenty of force and evidence from the continuing missteps by the nation's key key public health entities. The “bad Americans” narrative locates the root of our poor pandemic response in the selfish, ignorant, and tribal impulses of the populace in their embrace of Trumpian populism, vaccine denialism, and conspiracy theories. All these explanations capture part of the failure story and point to things to change and do differently if Americans want better results next time. In this paper, we want to focus on the failures within the public health community. Public health professionals—including the authors of this article —did fail, not each of us or in every case, but as a collective, as a field, as a “technology” for managing a pandemic. We drew faulty inferences, gave poor advice, and launched COVID-19 control rules with shocking indifference to social, psychological, economic, and political factors. Public health cannot be blamed for bad leaders, or budget cuts, fake news, or bad law. All of us in public health could certainly fall back on the defense that we were not heeded or lacked the power to properly deploy our expertise. But such outward-looking explanations do not capture the elements of the story that are useful to public health going forward. Knowing who else we can blame does not help those of us within the field of public health to be better or do better. Irresponsible leaders, angry Americans, and insufficient budgets are not “problems” that get in the way of public health— they are the conditions in which we work, and it just will not do to point to them as the causes of failure. Where we have agency in this broad field is over what we do, and there is plenty to talk about—not just COVID-19, but opioids, obesity, and other big problems we have identified that have not gotten better. This Article is not a thorough-going history of the pandemic response. By way of critique and suggesting a way forward for public health, we are going to imagine how public health—both the official agencies and the interconnected nodes in academia and health systems—might have approached COVID-19 differently. This is a story that focuses on good judgment as the lynchpin of optimal pandemic response and allows us to think about where good judgment seems to have been lacking, and how public health culture and institutions might change to improve the chances of better judgment next time.

5.
J Infect Dis ; 2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1873927

ABSTRACT

Although neutralizing antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 correlate with protection against COVID-19, little is known about the neutralizing and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) responses to COVID-19, MIS-C, and COVID-19 vaccination in children. We enrolled children 0-21 years of age with history of COVID-19 (n=13), MIS-C (n=13), or two doses of BNT162b2 vaccination (n=14) into a phlebotomy protocol. We measured pseudovirus neutralizing and functional ADCC antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 variants, including Omicron (B.1.1.529). The primary BNT162b2 vaccination series elicited higher neutralizing and ADCC responses with greater breadth to SARS-CoV-2 variants than COVID-19 or MIS-C. However, serologic responses were significantly reduced against variants, particularly Omicron.

6.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1860830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2 are significant causes of respiratory illness in children. METHODS: Influenza and COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among children <18 years old were analyzed from FluSurv-NET and COVID-NET, two population-based surveillance systems with similar catchment areas and methodology. The annual COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate per 100 000 during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (October 1, 2020-September 30, 2021) was compared to influenza-associated hospitalization rates during the 2017-18 through 2019-20 influenza seasons. In-hospital outcomes, including intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death, were compared. RESULTS: Among children <18 years old, the COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate (48.2) was higher than influenza-associated hospitalization rates: 2017-18 (33.5), 2018-19 (33.8), and 2019-20 (41.7). The COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate was higher among adolescents 12-17 years old (COVID-19: 59.9; influenza range: 12.2-14.1), but similar or lower among children 5-11 (COVID-19: 25.0; influenza range: 24.3-31.7) and 0-4 (COVID-19: 66.8; influenza range: 70.9-91.5) years old. Among children <18 years old, a higher proportion with COVID-19 required ICU admission compared with influenza (26.4% vs 21.6%; p < 0.01). Pediatric deaths were uncommon during both COVID-19- and influenza-associated hospitalizations (0.7% vs 0.5%; p = 0.28). CONCLUSIONS: In the setting of extensive mitigation measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, the annual COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate during 2020-2021 was higher among adolescents and similar or lower among children <12 years old compared with influenza during the three seasons before the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 adds substantially to the existing burden of pediatric hospitalizations and severe outcomes caused by influenza and other respiratory viruses.

7.
N Engl J Med ; 386(21): 2011-2023, 2022 05 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1839612

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Vaccination of children to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) is an urgent public health need. The safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the mRNA-1273 vaccine in children 6 to 11 years of age are unknown. METHODS: Part 1 of this ongoing phase 2-3 trial was open label for dose selection; part 2 was an observer-blinded, placebo-controlled expansion evaluation of the selected dose. In part 2, we randomly assigned children (6 to 11 years of age) in a 3:1 ratio to receive two injections of mRNA-1273 (50 µg each) or placebo, administered 28 days apart. The primary objectives were evaluation of the safety of the vaccine in children and the noninferiority of the immune response in these children to that in young adults (18 to 25 years of age) in a related phase 3 trial. Secondary objectives included determination of the incidences of confirmed Covid-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection, regardless of symptoms. Interim analysis results are reported. RESULTS: In part 1 of the trial, 751 children received 50-µg or 100-µg injections of the mRNA-1273 vaccine, and on the basis of safety and immunogenicity results, the 50-µg dose level was selected for part 2. In part 2 of the trial, 4016 children were randomly assigned to receive two injections of mRNA-1273 (50 µg each) or placebo and were followed for a median of 82 days (interquartile range, 14 to 94) after the first injection. This dose level was associated with mainly low-grade, transient adverse events, most commonly injection-site pain, headache, and fatigue. No vaccine-related serious adverse events, multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, myocarditis, or pericarditis were reported as of the data-cutoff date. One month after the second injection (day 57), the neutralizing antibody titer in children who received mRNA-1273 at a 50-µg level was 1610 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1457 to 1780), as compared with 1300 (95% CI, 1171 to 1443) at the 100-µg level in young adults, with serologic responses in at least 99.0% of the participants in both age groups, findings that met the prespecified noninferiority success criterion. Estimated vaccine efficacy was 88.0% (95% CI, 70.0 to 95.8) against Covid-19 occurring 14 days or more after the first injection, at a time when B.1.617.2 (delta) was the dominant circulating variant. CONCLUSIONS: Two 50-µg doses of the mRNA-1273 vaccine were found to be safe and effective in inducing immune responses and preventing Covid-19 in children 6 to 11 years of age; these responses were noninferior to those in young adults. (Funded by the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; KidCOVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT04796896.).


Subject(s)
2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , COVID-19 , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/adverse effects , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/immunology , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Child , Double-Blind Method , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Vaccine Efficacy , Young Adult
8.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-334439

ABSTRACT

Waning immunity after two SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccinations and the emergence of variants precipitated the need for a third dose of vaccine. We evaluated early safety and immunogenicity after a third mRNA vaccination in adults who received the mRNA-1273 primary series in the Phase 1 trial approximately 9 to 10 months earlier. The booster vaccine formulations included 100 mcg of mRNA-1273, 50 mcg of mRNA-1273.351 that encodes Beta variant spike protein, and bivalent vaccine of 25 mcg each of mRNA-1273 and mRNA-1273.351. A third dose of mRNA vaccine appeared safe with acceptable reactogenicity. Vaccination induced rapid increases in binding and neutralizing antibody titers to D614G, Beta, and Delta variants that were similar or greater than peak responses after the second dose. Spike-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells increased to similar levels as after the second dose. A third mRNA vaccination was well tolerated and generated robust humoral and T cell responses. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT04283461 (mRNA-1273 Phase 1) and NCT04785144 (mRNA-1273.351 Phase 1)

9.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(16): 574-581, 2022 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1811604

ABSTRACT

On October 29, 2021, the Food and Drug Administration expanded the Emergency Use Authorization for Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to children aged 5-11 years; CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices' recommendation followed on November 2, 2021.* In late December 2021, the B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) became the predominant strain in the United States,† coinciding with a rapid increase in COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among all age groups, including children aged 5-11 years (1). COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)§ data were analyzed to describe characteristics of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among 1,475 U.S. children aged 5-11 years throughout the pandemic, focusing on the period of early Omicron predominance (December 19, 2021-February 28, 2022). Among 397 children hospitalized during the Omicron-predominant period, 87% were unvaccinated, 30% had no underlying medical conditions, and 19% were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU). The cumulative hospitalization rate during the Omicron-predominant period was 2.1 times as high among unvaccinated children (19.1 per 100,000 population) as among vaccinated¶ children (9.2).** Non-Hispanic Black (Black) children accounted for the largest proportion of unvaccinated children (34%) and represented approximately one third of COVID-19-associated hospitalizations in this age group. Children with diabetes and obesity were more likely to experience severe COVID-19. The potential for serious illness among children aged 5-11 years, including those with no underlying health conditions, highlights the importance of vaccination among this age group. Increasing vaccination coverage among children, particularly among racial and ethnic minority groups disproportionately affected by COVID-19, is critical to preventing COVID-19-associated hospitalization and severe outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Ethnicity , Hospitalization , Humans , Minority Groups , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(1): 169-170, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806300
11.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-334405

ABSTRACT

Waning immunity after two SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccinations and the emergence of variants precipitated the need for booster doses. We evaluated safety and serological and cellular immunogenicity through 6 months after a third mRNA vaccination in adults who received the mRNA-1273 primary series in the Phase 1 trial approximately 9 to 10 months earlier. The booster vaccine formulations included 100 mcg of mRNA-1273, 50 mcg of mRNA-1273.351 that encodes Beta variant spike protein, and bivalent vaccine of 25 mcg each of mRNA-1273 and mRNA-1273.351. A third dose of mRNA vaccine appeared safe with acceptable reactogenicity. Vaccination induced rapid increases in binding and neutralizing antibody titers to D614G, Beta, Delta and Omicron variants that persisted through 6 months post-boost, particularly after administration of Beta-containing vaccines. Spike-specific CD4 + and CD8 + T cells increased to levels similar to those following the second dose. Boost vaccination induced broad and durable humoral and T cell responses. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT04283461 (mRNA-1273 Phase 1) and NCT04785144 (mRNA-1273.351 Phase 1)

12.
Cell Rep Med ; 3(4): 100603, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764032

ABSTRACT

The ongoing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic highlights the importance of determining the breadth and durability of humoral immunity to SARS-CoV-2 mRNA vaccination. Herein, we characterize the humoral response in 27 naive and 40 recovered vaccinees. SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody and memory B cell (MBC) responses are durable up to 6 months, although antibody half-lives are shorter for naive recipients. The magnitude of the humoral responses to vaccination strongly correlates with responses to initial SARS-CoV-2 infection. Neutralization titers are lower against SARS-CoV-2 variants in both recovered and naive vaccinees, with titers more reduced in naive recipients. While the receptor-binding domain (RBD) is the main neutralizing target of circulating antibodies, Moderna-vaccinated naives show a lesser reliance on RBDs, with >25% neutralization remaining after depletion of RBD-binding antibodies. Overall, we observe that vaccination induces higher peak titers and improves durability in recovered compared with naive vaccinees. These findings have broad implications for current vaccine strategies deployed against the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Viral Vaccines , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination
13.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(12): 466-473, 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761303

ABSTRACT

Beginning the week of December 19-25, 2021, the B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) became the predominant circulating variant in the United States (i.e., accounted for >50% of sequenced isolates).* Information on the impact that booster or additional doses of COVID-19 vaccines have on preventing hospitalizations during Omicron predominance is limited. Data from the COVID-19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)† were analyzed to compare COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates among adults aged ≥18 years during B.1.617.2 (Delta; July 1-December 18, 2021) and Omicron (December 19, 2021-January 31, 2022) variant predominance, overall and by race/ethnicity and vaccination status. During the Omicron-predominant period, weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates (hospitalizations per 100,000 adults) peaked at 38.4, compared with 15.5 during Delta predominance. Hospitalizations rates increased among all adults irrespective of vaccination status (unvaccinated, primary series only, or primary series plus a booster or additional dose). Hospitalization rates during peak Omicron circulation (January 2022) among unvaccinated adults remained 12 times the rates among vaccinated adults who received booster or additional doses and four times the rates among adults who received a primary series, but no booster or additional dose. The rate among adults who received a primary series, but no booster or additional dose, was three times the rate among adults who received a booster or additional dose. During the Omicron-predominant period, peak hospitalization rates among non-Hispanic Black (Black) adults were nearly four times the rate of non-Hispanic White (White) adults and was the highest rate observed among any racial and ethnic group during the pandemic. Compared with the Delta-predominant period, the proportion of unvaccinated hospitalized Black adults increased during the Omicron-predominant period. All adults should stay up to date (1) with COVID-19 vaccination to reduce their risk for COVID-19-associated hospitalization. Implementing strategies that result in the equitable receipt of COVID-19 vaccinations, through building vaccine confidence, raising awareness of the benefits of vaccination, and removing barriers to vaccination access among persons with disproportionately higher hospitalizations rates from COVID-19, including Black adults, is an urgent public health priority.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/ethnology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Humans , Immunization, Secondary , United States/epidemiology
14.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(11): 429-436, 2022 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1744552

ABSTRACT

The B.1.1.529 (Omicron) variant of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, has been the predominant circulating variant in the United States since late December 2021.* Coinciding with increased Omicron circulation, COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates increased rapidly among infants and children aged 0-4 years, a group not yet eligible for vaccination (1). Coronavirus Disease 19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)† data were analyzed to describe COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among U.S. infants and children aged 0-4 years since March 2020. During the period of Omicron predominance (December 19, 2021-February 19, 2022), weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalization rates per 100,000 infants and children aged 0-4 years peaked at 14.5 (week ending January 8, 2022); this Omicron-predominant period peak was approximately five times that during the period of SARS-CoV-2 B.1.617.2 (Delta) predominance (June 27-December 18, 2021, which peaked the week ending September 11, 2021).§ During Omicron predominance, 63% of hospitalized infants and children had no underlying medical conditions; infants aged <6 months accounted for 44% of hospitalizations, although no differences were observed in indicators of severity by age. Strategies to prevent COVID-19 among infants and young children are important and include vaccination among currently eligible populations (2) such as pregnant women (3), family members, and caregivers of infants and young children (4).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/diagnosis , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Population Surveillance/methods , United States
15.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330117

ABSTRACT

Background Influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2 are significant causes of respiratory illness in children. Methods Influenza and COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among children <18 years old were analyzed from FluSurv-NET and COVID-NET, two population-based surveillance systems with similar catchment areas and methodology. The annual COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate per 100 000 during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic (October 1, 2020–September 30, 2021) was compared to influenza-associated hospitalization rates during the 2017–18 through 2019–20 influenza seasons. In-hospital outcomes, including intensive care unit (ICU) admission and death, were compared. Results Among children <18 years old, the COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate (48.2) was higher than influenza-associated hospitalization rates: 2017–18 (33.5), 2018–19 (33.8), and 2019–20 (41.7). The COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate was higher among adolescents 12–17 years old (COVID-19: 59.9;influenza range: 12.2-14.1), but similar or lower among children 5–11 (COVID-19: 25.0;influenza range: 24.3-31.7) and 0–4 (COVID-19: 66.8;influenza range: 70.9-91.5) years old. Among children <18 years old, a higher proportion with COVID-19 required ICU admission compared with influenza (26.4% vs 21.6%;p<0.01). Pediatric deaths were uncommon during both COVID-19- and influenza-associated hospitalizations (0.7% vs 0.5%;p=0.28). Conclusions In the setting of extensive mitigation measures during the COVID-19 pandemic, the annual COVID-19-associated hospitalization rate during 2020–2021 was higher among adolescents and similar or lower among children <12 years old compared with influenza during the three seasons before the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 adds substantially to the existing burden of pediatric hospitalizations and severe outcomes caused by influenza and other respiratory viruses. Summary Annual hospitalization rates and proportions of hospitalized children experiencing severe outcomes were as high or higher for COVID-19 during October 2020–September 2021 compared with influenza during the three seasons before the COVID-19 pandemic, based on U.S. population-based surveillance data.

16.
J Allergy Clin Immunol ; 149(5): 1592-1606.e16, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739828

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a potentially life-threatening sequela of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection characterized by hyperinflammation and multiorgan dysfunction. Although hyperinflammation is a prominent manifestation of MIS-C, there is limited understanding of how the inflammatory state of MIS-C differs from that of well-characterized hyperinflammatory syndromes such as hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). OBJECTIVES: We sought to compare the qualitative and quantitative inflammatory profile differences between patients with MIS-C, coronavirus disease 2019, and HLH. METHODS: Clinical data abstraction from patient charts, T-cell immunophenotyping, and multiplex cytokine and chemokine profiling were performed for patients with MIS-C, patients with coronavirus disease 2019, and patients with HLH. RESULTS: We found that both patients with MIS-C and patients with HLH showed robust T-cell activation, markers of senescence, and exhaustion along with elevated TH1 and proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 9, and C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 10. In comparison, the amplitude of T-cell activation and the levels of cytokines/chemokines were higher in patients with HLH when compared with patients with MIS-C. Distinguishing inflammatory features of MIS-C included elevation in TH2 inflammatory cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-13 and cytokine mediators of angiogenesis, vascular injury, and tissue repair such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and platelet-derived growth factor. Immune activation and hypercytokinemia in MIS-C resolved at follow-up. In addition, when these immune parameters were correlated with clinical parameters, CD8+ T-cell activation correlated with cardiac dysfunction parameters such as B-type natriuretic peptide and troponin and inversely correlated with platelet count. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study characterizes unique and overlapping immunologic features that help to define the hyperinflammation associated with MIS-C versus HLH.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic , COVID-19/complications , Child , Cytokines/metabolism , Humans , Ligands , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
17.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(3): ofac070, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722566

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The serologic and cytokine responses of children hospitalized with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) vs coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are poorly understood. METHODS: We performed a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional study of hospitalized children who met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case definition for MIS-C (n = 118), acute COVID-19 (n = 88), or contemporaneous healthy controls (n = 24). We measured severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) spike receptor-binding domain (RBD) immunoglobulin G (IgG) titers and cytokine concentrations in patients and performed multivariable analysis to determine cytokine signatures associated with MIS-C. We also measured nucleocapsid IgG and convalescent RBD IgG in subsets of patients. RESULTS: Children with MIS-C had significantly higher SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG than children with acute COVID-19 (median, 2783 vs 146; P < .001), and titers correlated with nucleocapsid IgG. For patients with MIS-C, RBD IgG titers declined in convalescence (median, 2783 vs 1135; P = .010) in contrast to patients with COVID-19 (median, 146 vs 4795; P < .001). MIS-C was characterized by transient acute proinflammatory hypercytokinemia, including elevated levels of interleukin (IL) 6, IL-10, IL-17A, and interferon gamma (IFN-γ). Elevation of at least 3 of these cytokines was associated with significantly increased prevalence of prolonged hospitalization ≥8 days (prevalence ratio, 3.29 [95% CI, 1.17-9.23]). CONCLUSIONS: MIS-C was associated with high titers of SARS-CoV-2 RBD IgG antibodies and acute hypercytokinemia with IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, and IFN-γ.

18.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 71(7): 271-278, 2022 Feb 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1689711

ABSTRACT

The first U.S. case of COVID-19 attributed to the Omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) was reported on December 1, 2021 (1), and by the week ending December 25, 2021, Omicron was the predominant circulating variant in the United States.* Although COVID-19-associated hospitalizations are more frequent among adults,† COVID-19 can lead to severe outcomes in children and adolescents (2). This report analyzes data from the Coronavirus Disease 19-Associated Hospitalization Surveillance Network (COVID-NET)§ to describe COVID-19-associated hospitalizations among U.S. children (aged 0-11 years) and adolescents (aged 12-17 years) during periods of Delta (July 1-December 18, 2021) and Omicron (December 19, 2021-January 22, 2022) predominance. During the Delta- and Omicron-predominant periods, rates of weekly COVID-19-associated hospitalizations per 100,000 children and adolescents peaked during the weeks ending September 11, 2021, and January 8, 2022, respectively. The Omicron variant peak (7.1 per 100,000) was four times that of the Delta variant peak (1.8), with the largest increase observed among children aged 0-4 years.¶ During December 2021, the monthly hospitalization rate among unvaccinated adolescents aged 12-17 years (23.5) was six times that among fully vaccinated adolescents (3.8). Strategies to prevent COVID-19 among children and adolescents, including vaccination of eligible persons, are critical.*.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Population Surveillance , United States/epidemiology
19.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307504

ABSTRACT

The centrality of law as a public health intervention has been undeniable during the Covid-19 pandemic. In just the first half of 2020, more than 1000 laws and orders were issued by federal, state, and local authorities in the United States in an effort to reduce disease transmission. Legal interventions include stay-at-home orders, mask mandates, and travel restrictions, as well as more particular rules for business operations, alcohol sales, curfews, and health care. Given their heavy use, importance, and obvious socioeconomic side effects, and the social and behavioral complexities of their implementation, one might have expected the National Institutes of Health (NIH), other research funders, and the research community to jump to the work of determining the right mix, intensity, and enforcement approaches of legal restrictions to control transmission with the least and most equitably distributed harms. No organized research program emerged. This commentary calls for increased investment in research and funding to better understand the mechanisms of effect and impacts of law and policy on health and well-being.

20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(1): 169-170, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1650558
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