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1.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-332905

ABSTRACT

Objectives: It has been widely reported that the COVID-19 pandemic may have a psychological influence on people. Thus, it could be important to note how workplace infection prevention and control (IPC) measures for COVID-19 contribute to positive mental health among workers. We hypothesized that if workplace IPC measures are adequately implemented, they would have a positive effect on employees' work engagement. Methods: We conducted an internet-based prospective cohort study from December 2020 (baseline) to December 2021 (follow-up after one year) using self-administered questionnaires. At baseline, 27,036 workers completed the questionnaires, while 18,560 (68.7%) participated in the one-year follow-up. After excluding the 6,578 participants who changed jobs or retired during the survey period, or telecommuted more than four days per week, 11,982 participants were analyzed. We asked participants about the implementation of workplace IPC measures at baseline and conducted a nine-item version of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES–9) at follow-up. Results: Four groups were created according to the number of workplace IPC measures implemented. The mean (SD) UWES–9 score of the "0–2" group was the lowest at 18.3 (13.2), while that of the "8" group was the highest at 22.6 (12.6). The scores of the "3–5," "6–7," and "8" groups were significantly higher than that of the "0–2" group (all, p<0.001). The p trend of the four groups was also significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Promoting workplace IPC measures improves workers' work engagement, and a dose-response relationship exists between workplace IPC measures and work engagement.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-331764

ABSTRACT

Background: The Go To Travel campaign in Japan was launched to subsidize travel and accommodation costs for tourists through vouchers that could be used at domestic destinations. We examined the relationship between using Go To Travel and infection prevention behaviors. Methods: : We conducted a cross-sectional study of 26,637 workers who responded to a large-scale questionnaire survey about COVID-19 under the pandemic in Japan. We undertook logistic regression analysis. Results: : Among the 26,637 participants, 7,959 (30%) used Go To Travel. Compared with non-Go To Travel users, we observed statistically significant differences in multivariate analysis with Go To travel users for the following: gargling (odds ratio [OR], 0.91;95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87–0.97;P = .001);room ventilation (OR, 0.94;95% CI, 0.88–0.99;P = .017);and washing hands (OR, 0.94;95% CI, 0.89–1.00;P = .036). Conclusions: : We observed the tendency for Go To Travel users not to implement some infection prevention behaviors. It is necessary to continue the encouragement of applying infection prevention behaviors: implementing such travel support policies as Go To Travel during COVID-19 could spread the risk of infection. Trial registration: Not applicable

3.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 27(0): 2, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745378

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It is important to achieve herd immunity by vaccinating as many people as possible to end the COVID-19 pandemic. We investigated the relationship between willingness to receive vaccination and sources of health information among those who did not want to be vaccinated against COVID-19. METHODS: This prospective cohort study collected data using a self-administered questionnaire survey. The baseline survey was conducted during December 22-25, 2020, and the follow-up survey during February 18-19, 2021. Participants were aged 20-65 years and worked at the time of the baseline survey (N = 33,087). After excluding 6,051 invalid responses, we included responses from 27,036 participants at baseline. In total, 19,941 people responded to the follow-up survey (74% follow-up rate). We excluded 7,415 participants who answered "yes" to the question "If a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, would you like to get it?" in the baseline survey. We finally analyzed 12,526 participants. RESULTS: The odds ratio for change in willingness to be vaccinated from "no" to "yes" differed by source of health information. Compared with workers that used TV as a source of information, significantly fewer people who reported getting information from the Internet and friends/colleagues were willing to get the vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: It is important to approach workers who do not watch TV when implementing workplace vaccination programs. It is likely that willingness to be vaccinated can be increased through an active company policy whereby the top management recommend vaccination, coupled with an individual approach by occupational health professionals. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Not applicable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Young Adult
4.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 2022 Mar 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742997

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The work system reform and the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan have prompted efforts toward telecommuting in Japan. However, only a few studies have investigated the stress and health effects of telecommuting. Therefore, this study aimed to clarify the relationship between telecommuting and job stress among Japanese workers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. In December 2020, during the "third wave" of the COVID-19 pandemic, an Internet-based nationwide health survey of 33 087 Japanese workers (The Collaborative Online Research on Novel-coronavirus and Work, CORoNaWork study) was conducted. Data of 27 036 individuals were included after excluding 6051 invalid responses. The authors analyzed a sample of 13 468 office workers from this database. The participants were classified into 4 groups according to their telecommuting frequency, while comparing scores on the subscale of the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ) and subjective job stress between the high-frequency, medium-frequency, low-frequency, and non-telecommuters groups. A linear mixed model and an ordinal logistic regression analysis were used. RESULTS: A significant difference in the job control scores of the JCQ among the 4 groups was found, after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. The high-frequency telecommuters group had the highest job control score. Further, after adjusting for multiple confounding factors, the subjective job stress scores of the high- and medium-frequency telecommuters groups were significantly lower than those of the non-telecommuters group. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that high-frequency telecommuting was associated with high job control and low subjective job stress. The widespread adoption of telecommuting as a countermeasure to the public health challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic may also have a positive impact on job stress.

5.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): e109-e113, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1730746

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between attending work while experiencing fever or cold symptoms and workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was performed. Of a total of 33,302 participants, 3676 workers who experienced fever or cold symptoms after April 2020 were included. The odds ratios (ORs) of attending work while sick associated with workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics were evaluated using a multilevel logistic model. RESULTS: The OR of attending work while sick associated with a lack of policy prohibiting workers from working when ill was 2.75 (95% CI: 2.28 to 3.20, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that clear company policies on work and illness can be effective for preventing employees from attending work while sick.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(1): e1-e7, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606465

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We examined the association between socioeconomic and health status, and lifestyle and sickness presenteeism among Japanese workers during the COVID-19 epidemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using an Internet-monitor survey was conducted in December, 2020 in Japan. Of 33,302 survey participants, we analyzed 27,036 participants (13,814 men and 13,222 women) who reported experience with sickness presenteeism. RESULTS: The odds ratio (OR) of sickness presenteeism associated with unmarried versus married status was 1.15. Respective figures for other variables were 1.11 for manual laboring work compared to desk work; 1.79 and 2.29 for loss of employment at the time the pandemic began and continuation of unemployment compared with maintaining employment during the pandemic; and 3.34 for a feeling of financial instability compared with stability. CONCLUSION: The issue of sickness presenteeism has become more prominent under the COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Presenteeism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(3): e109-e113, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566094

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the association between attending work while experiencing fever or cold symptoms and workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was performed. Of a total of 33,302 participants, 3676 workers who experienced fever or cold symptoms after April 2020 were included. The odds ratios (ORs) of attending work while sick associated with workers' socioeconomic background and company characteristics were evaluated using a multilevel logistic model. RESULTS: The OR of attending work while sick associated with a lack of policy prohibiting workers from working when ill was 2.75 (95% CI: 2.28 to 3.20, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that clear company policies on work and illness can be effective for preventing employees from attending work while sick.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Class
8.
Arch Public Health ; 79(1): 222, 2021 Dec 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1562298

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19), it is important to avoid 3Cs (closed spaces, crowded places, and close-contact settings). However, the risk of contact with an unspecified number of people is inevitable while commuting to and from work. In this study, we investigated the relationship between commuting, and the risk of COVID-19 and COVID-19-induced anxiety. METHODS: An internet-based questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain a dataset from 27,036 respondents. One-way commuting time was evaluated using a five-case method. The commuting distance was estimated using zip codes of the home and workplace. Logistic regression analysis was performed with the following outcomes: COVID-19 risk, close contact, infection anxiety, and infection anxiety due to commuting. Commuting distance and commuting time were analyzed separately in the model. We excluded participants with incalculable commuting distance, commuting distance exceeding 300 km, commuting distance of 0 km, or who telecommuted at least once a week. RESULTS: The total number of participants included in the analysis was 14,038. The adjusted odds ratios (aORs) of using public transportation for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection were 4.17 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.51-6.93) (commuting time) and 5.18 (95% CI: 3.06-8.78) (commuting distance). The aOR of COVID-19 diagnosis decreased significantly with increasing commuting distance. The aORs of using public transportation to infection anxiety were 1.44 (95% CI: 1.31-1.59) (commuting time) and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.32-1.60) (commuting distance). The longer the commuting time, the more the aOR increased. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 risk, close contact, and infection anxiety were all associated with the use of public transportation during commuting. Both commuting distance and time were associated with infection anxiety due to commuting, and the strength of the association increased with increase in commuting time distance. Since transportation by commuting is associated with COVID-19 risk and anxiety, we recommend the use of telecommuting and other means of work.

9.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295432

ABSTRACT

Background We examined the association between socioeconomic and health status, and lifestyle and sickness presenteeism among Japanese workers during the COVID-19 epidemic. Methods A cross-sectional study using an Internet-monitor survey was conducted in December, 2020 in Japan. Of 33,302 survey participants, we analyzed 27,036 participants (13,814 men and 13,222 women ) who reported experience with sickness presenteeism. Results The odds ratio ( OR ) of sickness presenteeism associated with unmarried versus married status was 1.15. Respective figures for other variables were 1.11 for manual laboring work compared to desk work;1.79 and 2.29 for loss of employment at the time the pandemic began and continuation of unemployment compared to maintaining employment during the pandemic;and 3.34 for a feeling of financial instability compared to stability. Conclusion The issue of sickness presenteeism has become more prominent under the COVID-19 epidemic .

10.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294166

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to examine the relationship between telecommuting and the regional cumulative COVID-19 incidence. This was a cross-sectional study analyzing 13,468 office workers. The participant groups, according to the level of cumulative COVID-19 incidence by prefecture, were used as the predictor variable, and telecommuting frequency and preference were used as outcomes. We employed an ordinal logistic regression analysis. In regions with a high cumulative COVID-19 incidence, the proportion of participants who telecommuted more than two days per week was 34.7%, which was approximately 20% higher than in other regions. Telecommuting preference was stronger in areas with higher COVID-19 influence. However, in other regions, the proportion of participants who did not want to telecommute was higher than that of those who wanted to telecommute. We found that telecommuting frequency and preference were higher in regions with high cumulative COVID-19 incidence.

11.
Ind Health ; 2021 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1523651

ABSTRACT

To prevent the spread of infection, it is necessary for each individual to adopt infection prevention behavior. We investigated the effect of infection control measures implemented in the workplace on personal infection prevention behavior. We conducted a self-administered questionnaire survey through the Internet from December 22 to 25, 2020, during which period coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was spreading. Among respondents aged 20 to 65 years (n=27,036), 21,915 workers were included in the analysis. The results showed that as the number of infection control measures in the workplace increased, implementation of infection prevention behavior by individuals also significantly increased. However, the relationship differed depending on the type of personal infection prevention behavior. Specifically, infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace may affect personal infection prevention behavior. Implementation of infection control measures in the workplace increases awareness of the importance of individual infection prevention behavior and its implementation by all individuals. These findings may be applicable not only to COVID-19 measures but also to responses to other emerging infections and seasonal influenza.

12.
Front Public Health ; 9: 722071, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497171

ABSTRACT

Purpose: There is limited information about the association between workplace psychosocial factors and general worker mental health status during the COVID-19 pandemic. In the present study, we examined how anxiety about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace affected the association between job demands and psychological distress (PD). Method: A cross-sectional online survey was conducted in December 2020. The final analyzed sample was 27,036. The dependent variable of PD was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K6). Job demands were assessed using the Job Content Questionnaire. Feelings of anxiety were assessed by participants' responses to the following question: "Do you feel anxiety about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace?" We used a two-level regression adjusting for prefectural level: each individual-level variable at level 1 was nested into each prefecture at level 2, stratified by presence of anxiety. Results: A total of 50.5% of participants felt anxious about being infected by COVID-19 in the workplace. The interaction between anxiety and job demands was significant. Job demands were positively associated with PD. In the stratified analysis, the associations were stronger among employees who experienced anxiety about COVID-19 infection in the workplace than among those who did not. Conclusion: The association between job demands and PD may be strengthened by anxiety about COVID-19 infection in the workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Workplace
13.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(9): e631-e635, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398174

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study examined the relationship between worry about COVID-19 infection in the workplace and while commuting to work and psychological distress in Japan. METHODS: An internet monitor study was conducted. Out of a total of 33,302 participants, 26,841 people were included. The subjects were asked single-item questions about whether they were worried about COVID-19 infection in general, at work and while commuting to work. K6 was used to assess psychological distress. RESULTS: The OR was significantly higher in association with worry about infection in the workplace at 1.71 (95%CI 1.53 to 1.92) and worry about infection while commuting at 1.49 (95%CI 1.32 to 1.67). CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests the need for psychological intervention to reduce worry about infection in response to public mental health challenges associated with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Psychological Distress , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Transportation
14.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(11): 3975-3981, 2021 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1294650

ABSTRACT

Many factors are related to vaccination intentions. However, gender differences in the determinants of intention to get the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccine have not been fully investigated. This study examined gender differences in the determinants of willingness to get the COVID-19 vaccine among the working-age population in Japan. We conducted a cross-sectional study of Japanese citizens aged 20-65 years using an online self-administered questionnaire in December 2020. Logistic regression analysis was performed. Among 27,036 participants (13,814 men and 13,222 women), the percentage who were willing to get the COVID-19 vaccine was lower among women than among men (33.0% vs. 41.8%). Age and education level showed a gender gap regarding the association with willingness to get the COVID-19 vaccine: men who were older or had a higher level of education were more willing to get the vaccine, whereas women aged 30-49 years and those with a higher level of education showed a relatively low willingness to get the vaccine. For both men and women, marriage, higher annual household income, underlying disease, current smoking, vaccination for influenza during the current season, and fear of COVID-19 transmission were linked to a higher likelihood of being willing to get the COVID-19 vaccine. These findings give important insight into identifying target groups in need of intervention regarding COVID-19 vaccination, especially among women. Providing education about COVID-19 and influenza vaccination in the workplace may be an effective strategy to increase COVID-19 vaccine uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Vaccination
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