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1.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) ; 80(12):B227-B227, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2028135
3.
Cardiovasc Revasc Med ; 44: 98-100, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1894843

ABSTRACT

Ivermectin is an antiviral agent that has historically had a wide variety of uses. Recently, it has gained popularity in the mainstream media for use in treating and preventing COVID-19 infection, prompting high sales in veterinary grade Ivermectin. Studies are increasingly looking at Ivermectin as a possible agent for prevention and treatment of COVID-19, however further information is needed to assess efficacy and safety. Our project aimed to evaluate mortality differences in patients with COVID-19 infection who were prescribed Ivermectin vs. those not prescribed Ivermectin. Adult patients with active COVID-19 infection who were not prescribed Ivermectin (n = 797,285 Outpatient, n = 481,705 Inpatient, and n = 58,050 Intensive care unit), and those prescribed Ivermectin (n = 804 Outpatient, n = 1774 Inpatient, and n = 107 Intensive care unit) were evaluated. The cohorts were then evaluated for mortality comparing patients prescribed Ivermectin and those not prescribed Ivermectin in the Outpatient (7.7 % vs 2.2 %, P < 0.001), Inpatient not requiring Intensive Care (15.6 % vs 7.2 %, P ≤ 0.001), and Intensive care (20.6 % vs 19.6 %, P = 0.86) treatment settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ivermectin , Adult , Humans , Ivermectin/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents
4.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0264301, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703889

ABSTRACT

Remdesivir (RDV) reduces time to clinical improvement in hospitalized COVID -19 patients requiring supplemental oxygen. Dexamethasone improves survival in those requiring oxygen support. Data is lacking on the efficacy of combination therapy in patients on mechanical ventilation. We analyzed for comparative outcomes between Corticosteroid (CS) therapy with combined Corticosteroid and Remdesivir (CS-RDV) therapy. We conducted an observational cohort study of patients aged 18 to 90 with COVID-19 requiring ventilatory support using TriNetX (COVID-19 Research Network) between January 20, 2020, and February 9, 2021. We compared patients who received at least 48 hours of CS-RDV combination therapy to CS monotherapy. The primary outcome was 28-day all-cause mortality rates in propensity-matched (PSM) cohorts. Secondary outcomes were Length of Stay (LOS), Secondary Bacterial Infections (SBI), and MRSA (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus), and Pseudomonas infections. We used univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models and stratified log-rank tests. Of 388 patients included, 91 (23.5%) received CS-RDV therapy, and 297 (76.5%) received CS monotherapy. After propensity score matching, with 74 patients in each cohort, all-cause mortality was 36.4% and 29.7% in the CS-RDV and CS therapy, respectively (P = 0.38). We used a Kaplan-Meier with a log-rank test on follow up period (P = 0.23), and a Hazards Ratio model (P = 0.26). SBI incidence was higher in the CS group (13.5% vs. 35.1%, P = 0.02) with a similar LOS (13.4 days vs. 13.4 days, P = 1.00) and similar incidence of MRSA/Pseudomonas infections (13.5% vs. 13.5%, P = 1.00) in both the groups. Therefore, CS-RDV therapy is non-inferior to CS therapy in reducing 28-day all-cause in-hospital mortality but associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of SBI in critically ill COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Cohort Studies , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Kaplan-Meier Estimate , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models , Pseudomonas Infections/diagnosis , Pseudomonas Infections/epidemiology , Pseudomonas Infections/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/epidemiology , Staphylococcal Infections/etiology , Treatment Outcome
5.
JACC: Cardiovascular Interventions ; 15(4, Supplement):S28, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1698457
6.
Cureus ; 13(12): e20410, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1629849

ABSTRACT

Background This study investigates the relationship between coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and acute pancreatitis. We present large registry data assessing the association between acute pancreatitis and mortality in patients with COVID-19 post-infection. Methods The researchers identified adult patients aged 18-90 years with COVID-19 infections in the TriNetX (COVID-19 research network) database between January 20, 2020, and June 1, 2021. The researchers identified n=1,039,688 cases divided into two cohorts: those with post-acute pancreatitis (n= 1,173) and those without post-acute pancreatitis (n=1,038,515) post COVID-19 infection having follow-up within a two-week period. The researchers then conducted a 1:1 propensity score match to account for differences in the cohorts and created two well-matched cohorts (n=1,173/1,173). Results Patients that developed acute pancreatitis had higher mortality (12.4% vs 3.7%, p<0.001), stroke (3.6% vs 1.7%, p=0.005), higher inpatient admissions (28.2% vs 10.6%, p<0.001), and higher rates of ICU admission (9.5% vs 3.2%, p<0.001). Conclusion In a large multinational federated database, we observed higher mortality, stroke, higher inpatient admissions, and higher rates of ICU admissions among patients with COVID-19 with pancreatitis.

9.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 6(2): 114-119, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1587017

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To present a large registry data assessing the association between myocarditis and mortality in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The researchers identified adult patients aged 18 to 90 years of age with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) diagnosis in the TriNetX (COVID-19 research network) database between January 20, 2020, and December 9, 2020. These patients were then divided into groups of those who had a positive myocarditis diagnosis and those who did not. The researchers compared all-cause mortality between propensity-matched pairs of patients in both groups. RESULTS: A total of 259,352 patients with COVID-19 diagnosis were included in the study. Of those patients, 383 (0.2%) had myocarditis diagnosis, whereas 258,969 (99.8%) did not have myocarditis diagnosis during their hospital stay. Patients were predominantly male in the myocarditis group (59.0% vs 45.0%, P<0.001). As to the propensity-matched cohorts, 383 of 383 were matched, and the all-cause mortality was 13.4 % vs 4.2% (P<0.001) at 30 days. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was also statistically significant (P<0.001) at 30 days. CONCLUSION: In a large multinational database of COVID-19 patients, we observed an association between myocarditis diagnosis and increased mortality. Further prospective studies are recommended to further assess myocarditis outcomes in COVID-19 patients and treatment options.

10.
The American journal of cardiology ; 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1505308
12.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology ; 77(18, Supplement 1):3092, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1213744
13.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology ; 77(18, Supplement 1):3084, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1213736
15.
Journal of the American College of Cardiology ; 77(18, Supplement 1):3037, 2021.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1213700
17.
Pharmacotherapy ; 40(11): 1072-1081, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-842925

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is presently being used off-label or within a clinical trial. OBJECTIVES: We investigated a multinational database of patients with COVID-19 with real-world data containing outcomes and their relationship to HCQ use. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality within 30 days of follow-up. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study of patients receiving HCQ within 48 hours of hospital admission. Medications, preexisting conditions, clinical measures on admission, and outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Among patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19 in our propensity-matched cohort, the mean ages ± SD were 62.3 ± 15.9 years (53.7% male) and 61.9 ± 16.0 years (53.0% male) in the HCQ and no-HCQ groups, respectively. There was no difference in overall 30-day mortality between the HCQ and no-HCQ groups (HCQ 13.1%, n=367; no HCQ 13.6%, n=367; odds ratio 0.95, 95% confidence interval 0.62-1.46) after propensity matching. Although statistically insignificant, the HCQ-azithromycin (AZ) group had an overall mortality rate of 14.6% (n=199) compared with propensity-matched no-HCQ-AZ cohort's rate of 12.1% (n=199, OR 1.24, 95% CI 0.70-2.22). Importantly, however, there was no trend in this cohort's overall mortality/arrhythmogenesis outcome (HCQ-AZ 17.1%, no HCQ-no AZ 17.1%; OR 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.7). CONCLUSIONS: We report from a large retrospective multinational database analysis of COVID-19 outcomes with HCQ and overall mortality in hospitalized patients. There was no statistically significant increase in mortality and mortality-arrhythmia with HCQ or HCQ-AZ.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Drug Repositioning , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Off-Label Use , Aged , Clinical Trials as Topic , Cohort Studies , Databases, Factual , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/administration & dosage , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality/trends , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
19.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 95(8): 1613-1620, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-437432

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To confirm whether a relationship exists between male sex and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) mortality and whether this relationship is age dependent. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We queried the COVID-19 Research Network, a multinational database using the TriNetX network, to identify patients with confirmed COVID-19 infection. The main end point of the study was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 14,712 patients were included, of whom 6387 (43%) were men. Men were older (mean age, 55.0±17.7 years vs 51.1±17.9 years; P<.001) and had a higher prevalence of hypertension, diabetes, coronary disease, obstructive pulmonary disease, nicotine dependence, and heart failure but a lower prevalence of obesity. Before propensity score matching (PSM), all-cause mortality rate was 8.8% in men and 4.3% in women (odds ratio, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.87 to 2.46; P<.001) at a median follow-up duration of 34 and 32 days, respectively. In the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the cumulative probability of survival was significantly lower in men than in women (73% vs 86%; log-rank, P<.001). After PSM, all-cause mortality remained significantly higher in men than in women (8.13% vs 4.60%; odds ratio, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.55 to 2.11; P<.001). In the Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the cumulative probability of survival remained significantly lower in men than in women (74% vs 86%; log-rank, P<.001). The cumulative probability of survival remained significantly lower in propensity score-matched men than in women after excluding patients younger than 50 years and those who were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker medications on admission. CONCLUSION: Among patients with COVID-19 infection, men had a significantly higher mortality than did women, and this difference was not completely explained by the higher prevalence of comorbidities in men.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Propensity Score , Registries , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Survival Analysis , Young Adult
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