Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 4 de 4
Filter
1.
Am J Surg ; 221(2): 277-284, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1827840

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic has placed tremendous physical and mental strain on the US healthcare system. Studies examining the effects of outbreaks have demonstrated both an increased prevalence and long-term development of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms in healthcare providers. We sought to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the psychological well-being of medical providers, medical trainees, and administrators at a large academic center to identify stressors and moderators to guide future mental health and hospital-system interventions. METHODS: A 42-item survey examining specific stressors, grit, and resilience was widely distributed to physicians, residents, fellows, and administrators a large academic institution for departmental distribution. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and multivariate linear regressions. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 785 participants completed the survey. The majority of respondents rated their stress to be significantly increased during the pandemic. Respondents' fear of transmitting the virus to their family members was a significant stressor. Higher resilience was associated with lower stress, anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disturbances. Overall, respondents felt supported by their departments and institution and felt contingency plans and personal protective equipment were adequate. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare workers have increased resilience in the face of heightened stress during a pandemic. Higher resilience and grit were protective factors in managing personal and system-level stressors at the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in our institution. Implementing an intervention designed to enhance healthcare workers' resilience in response to the COVID-19 pandemic is warranted.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Resilience, Psychological , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
2.
Am J Surg ; 2022 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1712425

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: We assessed students' perception of the impact of the pandemic on their well-being, education, academic achievement, and whether grit and resilience alter students' ability to mitigate the stress associated with disruptions in education. We hypothesized that students would report a negative impact, and those with higher grit and resilience scores would be less impacted. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team of educators created and distributed a survey to medical students. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and multivariate linear regressions. A p-value <.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 195 students were included in the study. Approximately 92% reported that clinical education was negatively affected, including participants with higher grit scores. Students with higher resilience scores were more optimistic about clinical education. Those with higher resilience scores were less likely to report anxiety, insomnia, and tiredness. CONCLUSION: More resilient students were able to manage the stress associated with the disruption in their education. Resiliency training should be year-specific, and integrated into the UME curriculum due to the different demands each year presents.

3.
American journal of surgery ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1651950

ABSTRACT

Introduction We assessed students' perception of the impact of the pandemic on their well-being, education, academic achievement, and whether grit and resilience alter students’ ability to mitigate the stress associated with disruptions in education. We hypothesized that students would report a negative impact, and those with higher grit and resilience scores would be less impacted. Methods A multidisciplinary team of educators created and distributed a survey to medical students. Survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and multivariate linear regressions. A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results A total of 195 students were included in the study. Approximately 92% reported that clinical education was negatively affected, including participants with higher grit scores. Students with higher resilience scores were more optimistic about clinical education. Those with higher resilience scores were less likely to report anxiety, insomnia, and tiredness. Conclusion More resilient students were able to manage the stress associated with the disruption in their education. Resiliency training should be year-specific, and integrated into the UME curriculum due to the different demands each year presents.

4.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254077, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurse identification of patient deterioration is critical, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as patients can deteriorate quickly. While the literature has shown that nurses rely on intuition to make decisions, there is limited information on what sources of data experienced nurses utilize to inform their intuition. The objectives of this study were to identify sources of data that inform nurse decision-making related to recognition of deteriorating patients, and explore how COVID-19 has impacted nurse decision-making. METHODS: In this qualitative study, experienced nurses voluntarily participated in focused interviews. During focused interviews, expert nurses were asked to share descriptions of memorable patient encounters, and questions were posed to facilitate reflections on thoughts and actions that hindered or helped their decision-making. They were also asked to consider the impact of COVID-19 on nursing and decision-making. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, study team members reviewed transcripts and coded responses, and organized key findings into themes. RESULTS: Several themes related to decision-making were identified by the research team, including: identifying patient care needs, workload management, and reflecting on missed care opportunities to inform learning. Participants (n = 10) also indicated that COVID-19 presented a number of unique barriers to nurse decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that experienced nurses utilize several sources of information to inform their intuition. It is apparent that the demands on nurses in response to pandemics are heightened. Decision-making themes drawn from participants' experiences can to assist nurse educators for training nursing students on decision-making for deteriorating patients and how to manage the potential barriers (e.g., resource constraints, lack of family) associated with caring for patients during these challenging times prior to encountering these issues in the clinical environment. Nurse practice can utilize these findings to increase awareness among experienced nurses on recognizing how pandemic situations can impact to their decision-making capability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Clinical Decision-Making , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Assessment , Professional-Family Relations , Qualitative Research , Symptom Assessment , Workload
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL