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1.
New Microbiol ; 45(1):62-72, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-1782123

ABSTRACT

Convalescent plasma (CP) therapy might be effective in patients with haematological malignanciesand B-cell depletion. We report a single-centre experience of COVID-19 patients with non-Hodgkinlymphoma and absence of B-cells as a consequence of anti-CD20 therapy successfully treated withCP from October 2020 to May 2021. CP was given in the presence of pneumonia with respiratoryfailure despite standard treatment and consisted of three infusions on an alternate-day basis. A reviewof the current literature on this topic was also performed. Six patients were identified (medianage 59.5 years (range 50-73)). The last anti-CD20 drug administration occurred 60 days before infection(range 0-360). CP was administered after a median of 51 days (range 9-120) from SARS-CoV-2diagnosis, with an early improvement in all but one subject. We suggest a possible clinical benefitof convalescent CP treatment in COVID-19 patients with haematological malignancies and B-celldepletion having persistent/recurrent pneumonia.

2.
New Microbiologica ; 44(3):145-154, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1717338

ABSTRACT

This retrospective and observational cohort study investigated chest computed tomography (CT) findings, cycle threshold (Ct) values in RT-PCR of SARS-CoV-2 and secondary infection occurrence to predict prognosis in COVID-19 patients. At hospital admission, CT findings and Ct values were collected. Microbiology tests performed after 48 hours from hospitalization were reviewed. According to in-hospital mortality, patients were grouped into non-survivors and survivors. Among 283 patients evaluated, in-hospital mortality rate was 13.8% (39/283). Secondary infection occurrence was 15.2% (43/283). Cut-off values for CT score > 13.5 (AUC = 0.682 p = 0.0009) and for Ct < 23.4 (AUC = 0.749, p < 0.0001) were predictive of death. Super-additive and synergic effects between high CT score plus secondary infection occurrence as well as between high CT score plus low Ct values affecting patient's outcome were observed. Chest CT score and Ct values in RT-PCR of SARS-CoV-2 could have a combination role for severity stratification of COVID-19 patients.

3.
European Heart Journal Supplements ; 23(G):1, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1684655
4.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 44(12): 2675-2684, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504521

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to relevant repercussions on reproductive medicine, we aimed to evaluate feasibility of RT-PCR as a detection method of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in seminal fluid. METHODS: A qualitative determination of the RT-PCR assays in semen was performed through different approaches: (1) efficiency of RNA extraction from sperm and seminal plasma was determined using PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA and a heterologous system as control; (2) samples obtained by diluting viral preparation from a SARS-CoV-2 panel (virus cultured in Vero E6 cell lines) were tested; (3) viral presence in different fractions of seminal fluid (whole sample, seminal plasma and post-centrifugation pellet) was evaluated. Semen samples from mild and recovered COVID-19 subjects were collected by patients referring to the Infectious Disease Department of the Policlinico Umberto I Hospital - "Sapienza" University of Rome. Control subjects were recruited at the Laboratory of Seminology-Sperm Bank "Loredana Gandini'' of the same hospital. RESULTS: The control panel using viral preparations diluted in saline and seminal fluid showed the capability to detect viral RNA presence with Ct values depending on the initial viral concentration. All tested semen samples were negative for SARS-CoV-2, regardless of the nasopharyngeal swab result or seminal fluid fraction. CONCLUSION: These preliminary data show that RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 RNA testing appears to be a feasible method for the molecular diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 in seminal fluid, supported by results of the control panel. The ability to detect SARS-CoV-2 in semen is extremely important for reproductive medicine, especially in assisted reproductive technology and sperm cryopreservation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Pathology, Molecular/methods , Semen/virology , Adult , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Male , RNA, Messenger/chemistry , RNA, Viral/chemistry , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction , Reproductive Techniques , Vero Cells
6.
Endoscopy ; 53(SUPPL 1):S257, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1254058

ABSTRACT

Aims An outbreak of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has altered the dynamic of endoscopic practices. Many guidelines, questionnaires have been published addressing service resumption during the pandemic. Curious about the situation indifferent endoscopic units across the globe, the study was designed to evaluate different aspects of practice resumptionworldwide and their adherence to guidelines. Methods An online questionnaire was created and distributed by national/regional representatives and societies. Redcapplatform was used as the interface;afterwards, Microsoft Excel 2016 and Prism 5 were utilized for data analysis. Results From a total of 307 responses from 47 countries/regions was collected, 290 valid answers were analyzed. Almosthalf (47 %) were in post-peak period by August, 2020. Many units were not designated to be COVID-oriented facility. About15.5 % of centers remained unrecovered, mainly in North and South America;those were recovered, training was still withheld significantly. Nevertheless, opened centers kept safety measurements strictly. Patient load was decreased by 37 %,but waiting list was increased 0-25 %. Among many surveillance methods, body temperature, PCR and chest CT were themost common. 74.8 % increased post-procedural disinfection time and 68.2 % increase in per-case inspection were noted.PPE usage was implemented highly and shortage of these posed as one of the resumption barriers. Post-procedural patientsurveillance was not reinforced. Conclusions The study represented real-time global endoscopic service's adaptation to COVID-19 pandemic. Previouslypublished barriers upon practice resumption remained. Despite Delphi consensus' emphasis on post-procedural surveillance, application was not widely reinforced, raising concerns in disease control.

7.
Topics in Antiviral Medicine ; 29(1):68, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1250684

ABSTRACT

Background: A severe SARS-CoV-2 related immunopathology may be the driver cause underlying the deleterious clinical manifestations observed in COVID-19 patients. To identify possible tissue-specific immune responses patterns, a compartmental immunophenotyping analysis of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and IFN response has been performed in SARS-CoV-2 infected subjects with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Methods: Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) samples were collected from 13 SARS-CoV-2 infected subjects (9 males and 4 females) consecutively admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of Policlinico Umberto I, Sapienza University Hospital in Rome (Italy). The frequencies of CD4+, CD8+ T lymphocytes and those expressing immune activation markers (CD38, HLADR), naïve, central memory (CMEM), and effector memory (TEM) T cell subsets were evaluated in both anatomical sites by multiparametric flow cytometry. Gene expression levels of Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) and the Interferon Stimulated Gene 15 (ISG15) were evaluated in BAL and PBMC by Real-time PCR. Results: Critically SARS-CoV-2 infected patients exhibited a lung compartmentalization of CD8+ T cells (p=0.003), with a lower CD4/CD8 ratio in BAL compared to blood district (p<0.01). However, higher frequencies of CD8+ T cells were recorded in PBMC of female SARS-CoV-2 infected patients (p=0.04) and the same trend was observed in the lung compartment. By contrast, a trend of increasing CD4+ T cells frequencies was observed in BAL samples of male patients, as opposed to blood compartment. Additionally, an increased expression of immune activation markers CD38 and HLADR has been detected in BAL CD8+ T cells (p<0.01) as well as in blood CD4+ T cells (p=0.03). An increased frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ TEM cells has been documented in BAL of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients (p<0.05), as opposed to higher frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ TCM cells recorded in the blood compartment (p<0.01). Notably, higher levels of ISG15 and IRF7 found in BAL were inversely associated to activated CD8+ T cell frequencies in the lung compartment compared to blood district (ISG15: r=-0.570, p<0.05) (IRF7: r=-0.683, p=0.01). Conclusion: Our findings provide new insight into a distinct T cells profile and IFN genes expression in the lung and in the blood compartment of SARS-CoV-2 infected patients, that might be highly relevant for the clinical course of COVID-19.

8.
Journal of Endocrinological Investigation ; 30:30, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209565

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Due to relevant repercussions on reproductive medicine, we aimed to evaluate feasibility of RT-PCR as a detection method of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in seminal fluid. METHODS: A qualitative determination of the RT-PCR assays in semen was performed through different approaches: (1) efficiency of RNA extraction from sperm and seminal plasma was determined using PRM1 and PRM2 mRNA and a heterologous system as control;(2) samples obtained by diluting viral preparation from a SARS-CoV-2 panel (virus cultured in Vero E6 cell lines) were tested;(3) viral presence in different fractions of seminal fluid (whole sample, seminal plasma and post-centrifugation pellet) was evaluated. Semen samples from mild and recovered COVID-19 subjects were collected by patients referring to the Infectious Disease Department of the Policlinico Umberto I Hospital - "Sapienza" University of Rome. Control subjects were recruited at the Laboratory of Seminology-Sperm Bank "Loredana Gandini'' of the same hospital. RESULTS: The control panel using viral preparations diluted in saline and seminal fluid showed the capability to detect viral RNA presence with C<sub>t</sub> values depending on the initial viral concentration. All tested semen samples were negative for SARS-CoV-2, regardless of the nasopharyngeal swab result or seminal fluid fraction. CONCLUSION: These preliminary data show that RT-PCR for SARS-CoV-2 RNA testing appears to be a feasible method for the molecular diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 in seminal fluid, supported by results of the control panel. The ability to detect SARS-CoV-2 in semen is extremely important for reproductive medicine, especially in assisted reproductive technology and sperm cryopreservation.

9.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 43(12): 1819-1822, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-108915

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The recent appearance of SARS-CoV-2 in Wuhan in 2019 has started a pandemic which has involved over a million people worldwide. A matter of debate is the possible viral detection in different body fluids than respiratory droplets. Thus, we evaluated the possible presence of SARS-CoV-2 in semen and urine samples of a volunteer with confirmed COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A 31-year-old man with fever, myalgia, anosmia, and ageusia was tested and found positive for SARS-CoV-2 through a pharyngeal swab. Eight days after he provided semen and urine samples in which viral RNA presence was measured using a Real time RT PCR system (RealStar SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR, Altona Diagnostics) targeting E and S viral genes. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Semen and urine samples search for SARS-CoV-2 RNA was negative. Although this should be interpreted cautiously, it may be possible that either the viral clearance kinetics in these matrices matches the progressive clinical recovery of the patient or that the virus was never present in these fluids at the time of the laboratory diagnosis.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/standards , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , Semen/virology , Specimen Handling/standards , Urinalysis/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
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