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1.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-310000

ABSTRACT

Introduction: An outbreak of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) has altered the dynamic of world’s healthcare system, including endoscopic practices. Curious about the situation in different endoscopic units across the globe, the study was designed to evaluate different aspects of practice resumption worldwide.Methods: An online questionnaire was created and distributed by national/regional representatives. Redcap® platform was used as the interface;afterwards, Microsoft Excel 2016 and Prism 5 were utilized for data analysis.Results: A total of 307 responses from 47 countries/regions was collected, from which 290 valid answers were inducted and further analyzed. Almost half (47%) were in post-peak period by August, 2020. Many units were not designated to be COVID-oriented facility. About 15.5% of centers remained unrecovered, mainly in North and South America;those were recovered, training was still withheld significantly. Nevertheless, opened centers kept safety measurement strictly. Though patient load was decreased by 37% in most centers, waiting list was increased 0-25%. Among many surveillance methods, body temperature, PCR and chest CT prevailed the be the most commonly used. 74.8% claimed to have increased post-procedural disinfection time and 68.2% also observed an increased in per-case inspection. PPE usage was implemented highly and shortage of these posed as one of the resumption barriers. Post-procedural patient surveillance was not reinforced.Conclusions: The study reflected closely the global revolution of the pandemic. Shortage in staff and PPE as well as difficulty in training resumption remained barriers worldwide. Incapacity of patient post-procedural surveillance raised concerns in disease control.Funding Statement: None to declare.Declaration of Interests: None to declare.Ethics Approval Statement: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the National Liver Institute, Menoufia University, Egypt (NLI IRB 00003413) in June 2020, protocol number 00203/2020.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has imposed radical behavioral and social changes in the general population, significantly impacting the lives of individuals affected by disabilities. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on non-institutionalized subjects with sensorineural disabilities during the first COVID-19 wave in Italy. METHODS: A 39-item online national survey was disseminated from 1 April 2020 to 31 June 2020 via social media throughout Italy to communities of individuals with proven severe sensorineural disabilities, affiliated to five national patient associations. The survey collected extensive information on the socio-demographic profile, health, everyday activities, and lifestyle of individuals with hearing and visual disabilities. RESULTS: One hundred and sixty-three respondents with hearing (66.9%) and visual (33.1%) disabilities returned a usable questionnaire. The mean age of interviewees was 38.4 ± 20.2 years and 56.3% of them were females. Despite the vast majority of respondents (77.9%) perceiving their health status as unchanged (68.8% of interviewees with hearing deficits vs. 96.3% of those with visual impairments), about half the interviewees reported sleep disorders during lock-down, more likely those with visual deficits. Remote services were seemingly more effective for business than school activities. Furthermore, although just 18.8% of respondents rated remote rehabilitation care unsatisfactory, only 12.8% of interviewees felt supported by health and social services during the COVID-19 emergency. The vast majority of respondents were concerned about the future and the risk of SARS-CoV-2 contagion, particularly individuals with hearing impairments. Among the various risk mitigation measures, facemasks caused the greatest discomfort due to communication barriers, particularly among interviewees affected by hearing disabilities (92.2% vs. 45.7%). The most common request (46.5%) of respondents to reduce the inconveniences of the COVID-19 emergency country lock-down was improving the access to and delivery of health and social services for individuals with sensorineural disabilities (19.3%), followed by the use of transparent masks (17.5%). CONCLUSIONS: Although health protection measures such as face masks and social distancing play a key role in preventing and controlling the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the unmet needs of disabled individuals should be carefully considered, especially those affected by sensory disabilities. Tailored access to health and social services for individuals affected by sensorineural disabilities should be implemented. Additional actions should include the use of to face masks to reduce communication barriers linked to hearing-impairment, as well as the improvement of remote services, especially distance learning at school.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Female , Hearing , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
6.
Eur J Ophthalmol ; 32(1): 680-687, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105653

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Ophthalmic Emergency Department (OED) activity of the tertiary eye centre of Verona. METHODS: OED reports of patients visited during lockdown (COVID-period) and in the corresponding period of 2017, 2018 and 2019 (COVID-free period) have been retrieved to draw a comparison. Patients' demographic and clinical data recorded and analysed are the following: age, gender, previous ocular history, aetiology, symptoms onset, type of symptoms, discharge diagnosis, urgency and severity of diagnosis. RESULTS: OED consultations dropped from 20.6 ± 7.3 visits/day of the COVID-free period to 8.6 ± 4.6 visits/day of the COVID-period. In the COVID-period patients waited longer before physically going to the OED, lamented more vision loss and less redness and reported a higher percentage of traumatic events when compared to the COVID-free period. A significant reduction of ocular surface conditions occurred, while vitreo-retinal disorders increased. Overall, both urgency and severity of diagnosed diseases raised significantly in the COVID-period. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic drove a significant reduction of the overall OED activity. People with less urgent and milder conditions preferred to wait and endure their ocular discomfort for a few days rather than leaving home and risking to contract the infection. Our analysis highlights how several times the OED is used improperly by patients diagnosed with non-urgent disorders. A more accurate use of the OED would allow a reduction of management costs and the avoidance of overcrowding, which can lead to delays in the care of patients that really need assistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Tech Innov Gastrointest Endosc ; 23(2): 212-214, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-957431

ABSTRACT

The main barrier for a young researcher in the field of endoscopy is that too much is known about virtually every aspect not only of the natural history, but also of the efficacy and safety of different Gastrointestinal (GI) techniques. The main fuel for research remains uncertainty, and this has been the primary characteristic of COVID-19. The unprecedented visibility of the main papers on the natural history and medical management of COVID-19 on all the main worldwide medical Journals has had an effect of drainage on the reports of COVID-19 in GI endoscopy, suddenly opening up the interest of main GI journals to this topic. Furthermore, given the nature and the urgency of the topic, these high-ranking journals have accepted study designs outside rigorous randomized controlled trials and/or systematic reviews and meta-analysis, what used to be the "conditio sine qua non" for being considered for publication. Suddenly, rigorous guidelines have been replaced by expert-derived suggestions on the basis that the best possible guidance is better than no guidance. This situation has been a great occasion for young researchers to gain visibility even without having access to the complex means and long time-spans needed to finalize a randomized trial.

8.
Endosc Int Open ; 8(8): E1097-E1101, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-711892

ABSTRACT

Background and study aims As with all other fields of medical practice, gastrointestinal endoscopy has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, data on the impact of the pandemic in Africa, especially sub-Saharan Africa are lacking. Methods A web-based survey was conducted by the International Working Group of the European Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the World Endoscopy Organization to determine the impact and effects the COVID-19 pandemic has had on endoscopists in African countries. Results Thirty-one gastroenterologists from 14 countries in north, central, and sub-Saharan Africa responded to the survey. The majority of respondents reduced their endoscopy volume considerably. Personal protective equipment including FFP-2 masks were available in almost all participating centers. Pre-endoscopy screening was performed as well. Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on gastrointestinal endoscopy in most African countries; however, the impact may not have been as devastating as expected.

10.
Dis. Esophagus ; 5(33): 1-4, 20200501.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-133655

ABSTRACT

This is an official guidance statement of The International Society of the Diseases of the Esophagus (ISDE) to address all the operators involved in management of patients affected by upper gastrointestinal diseases during COVID-19 pandemic. This guidance is based on the best available evidence to date and will be updated as new evidence becomes available.

11.
Endoscopy ; 52(6): 483-490, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72296

ABSTRACT

We are currently living in the throes of the COVID-19 pandemic that imposes a significant stress on health care providers and facilities. Europe is severely affected with an exponential increase in incident infections and deaths. The clinical manifestations of COVID-19 can be subtle, encompassing a broad spectrum from asymptomatic mild disease to severe respiratory illness. Health care professionals in endoscopy units are at increased risk of infection from COVID-19. Infection prevention and control has been shown to be dramatically effective in assuring the safety of both health care professionals and patients. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (www.esge.com) and the European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (www.esgena.org) are joining forces to provide guidance during this pandemic to help assure the highest level of endoscopy care and protection against COVID-19 for both patients and endoscopy unit personnel. This guidance is based upon the best available evidence regarding assessment of risk during the current status of the pandemic and a consensus on which procedures to perform and the priorities on resumption. We appreciate the gaps in knowledge and evidence, especially on the proper strategy(ies) for the resumption of normal endoscopy practice during the upcoming phases and end of the pandemic and therefore a list of potential research questions is presented. New evidence may result in an updated statement.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/standards , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Risk Management/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal/methods , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Risk Management/methods
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