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1.
BMC Neurol ; 21(1): 332, 2021 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379784

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The consequences of strict COVID-19 mobility restrictions on motor/non-motor features in Parkinson's disease (PD) have not been systematically studied but worse mobility and quality of life have been reported. To elucidate this question, 12 mild to moderate PD patients were assessed in March 2020 before and after two months of isolation as part of a clinical study that had to be interrupted due to the pandemic and the implementation of COVID19 mobility restrictions. METHODS: Twelve patients were systematically evaluated before and after the lockdown period as part of a larger cohort that previously underwent thermal water rehabilitation. Clinical outcomes were the Body Mass index, the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test, the MDS-Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, the 6 Minute Walking Test and the New Freezing of Gait Questionnaire. Global cognition was evaluated with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale. The impact of COVID-19 restrictions on quality of life and functional independence was evaluated with The Parkinson's disease Quality of life (PDQ-39), the Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living questionnaires (IADL) and the Parkinson's disease cognitive functional rating scales (PD-CFRS). RESULTS: After two months of isolation the Mini-BESTest score worsened (p=0.005), and four patients reported one or more falls during the lockdown. BMI increased (p=0.031) while the remaining clinical variables including quality of life did not change. CONCLUSION: We observed moderate worsening at Mini-BESTest, greater risk of falls and increased body weight as consequence of prolonged immobility. We believe negative effects were partially softened since patients were in contact with our multidisciplinary team during the lockdown and had previously received training to respond to the needs of this emergency isolation. These findings highligh the importnace of patient-centered interventions in PD management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gait Disorders, Neurologic , Mobility Limitation , Parkinson Disease , Accidental Falls , Activities of Daily Living , Communicable Disease Control , Gait Disorders, Neurologic/etiology , Humans , Male , Parkinson Disease/complications , Quality of Life , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Expert Rev Neurother ; 21(6): 615-623, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203499

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Although in some countries, palliative care (PC) still remains poorly implemented, its importance throughout the course of Parkinson's disease (PD) is increasingly being acknowledged. With an emergence of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, growing emphasis has been placed on the palliative needs of people with Parkinson's (PwP), particularly elderly, frail, and with comorbidities.Areas covered: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses an enormous challenge on aspects of daily living in PwP and might interact negatively with a range of motor and non-motor symptoms (NMS), both directly and indirectly - as a consequence of pandemic-related social and health care restrictions. Here, the authors outline some of the motor and NMS relevant to PC, and propose a pragmatic and rapidly deployable, consensus-based PC approach for PwP during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, potentially relevant also for future pandemics.Expert opinion: The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a considerable impact on PwP and their caregivers, ranging from mental health issues to worsening of physical symptoms - both in the short- and long-term, (Long-COVID) and calls for specific, personalized PC strategies relevant in a lockdown setting globally. Validated assessment tools should be applied remotely to flag up particular motor or NMS that require special attention, both in short- and long-term.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Palliative Care , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Caregivers/psychology , Humans , Minority Groups , Parkinson Disease/ethnology , Quality of Life , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Spirituality
5.
Front Neurol ; 12: 633574, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133935

ABSTRACT

Background/Objective: During the COVID-19 pandemic, smell and taste disorders emerged as key non-respiratory symptoms. Due to widespread presence of the disease and to difficult objective testing of positive persons, the use of short surveys became mandatory. Most of the existing resources are focused on smell, very few on taste or trigeminal chemosensation called chemesthesis. However, it is possible that the three submodalities are affected differently by COVID-19. Methods: We prepared a short survey (TaSCA) that can be administered at the telephone or through online resources to explore chemosensation. It is composed of 11 items on olfaction, taste, and chemesthesis, in order to discriminate the three modalities. We avoided abstract terms, and the use of semiquantitative scales because older patients may be less engaged. Statistical handling included descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-squared test and cluster analysis. Results: The survey was completed by 83 persons (60 females and 23 males), which reported diagnosis of COVID-19 by clinical (n = 7) or molecular (n = 18) means, the others being non-COVID subjects. Cluster analysis depicted the existence of two groups, one containing mostly asymptomatic and one mostly symptomatic subjects. All swab-positive persons fell within this second group. Only one item, related to trigeminal temperature perception, did not discriminate between the two groups. Conclusions: These preliminary results indicate that TaSCA may be used to easily track chemosensory symptoms related to COVID-19 in an agile way, giving a picture of three different chemosensory modalities.

7.
NPJ Parkinsons Dis ; 6: 18, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-731016

ABSTRACT

This Viewpoint discusses insights from basic science and clinical perspectives on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)/severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in the brain, with a particular focus on Parkinson's disease. Major points include that neuropathology studies have not answered the central issue of whether the virus enters central nervous system neurons, astrocytes or microglia, and the brain vascular cell types that express virus have not yet been identified. Currently, there is no clear evidence for human neuronal or astrocyte expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the major receptor for viral entry, but ACE2 expression may be activated by inflammation, and a comparison of healthy and infected brains is important. In contrast to the 1918 influenza pandemic and avian flu, reports of encephalopathy in COVID-19 have been slow to emerge, and there are so far no documented reports of parkinsonism apart from a single case report. We recommend consensus guidelines for the clinical treatment of Parkinson's patients with COVID-19. While a role for the virus in causing or exacerbating Parkinson's disease appears unlikely at this time, aggravation of specific motor and non-motor symptoms has been reported, and it will be important to monitor subjects after recovery, particularly for those with persisting hyposmia.

12.
Mov Disord Clin Pract ; 7(4): 361-372, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-259913

ABSTRACT

Background: Although the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting a relatively small proportion of the global population, its effects have already reached everyone. The pandemic has the potential to differentially disadvantage chronically ill patients, including those with Parkinson's disease (PD). The first health care reaction has been to limit access to clinics and neurology wards to preserve fragile patients with PD from being infected. In some regions, the shortage of medical staff has also forced movement disorders neurologists to provide care for patients with COVID-19. Objective: To share the experience of various movement disorder neurologists operating in different world regions and provide a common approach to patients with PD, with a focus on those already on advanced therapies, which may serve as guidance in the current pandemic and for emergency situations that we may face in the future. Conclusion: Most of us were unprepared to deal with this condition given that in many health care systems, telemedicine has been only marginally available or only limited to email or telephone contacts. In addition, to ensure sufficient access to intensive care unit beds, most elective procedures (including deep brain stimulation or the initiation of infusion therapies) have been postponed. We all hope there will soon be a time when we will return to more regular hospital schedules. However, we should consider this crisis as an opportunity to change our approach and encourage our hospitals and health care systems to facilitate the remote management of chronic neurological patients, including those with advanced PD.

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