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1.
JTCVS open ; 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1870883

ABSTRACT

Objectives The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic negatively impacted cardiothoracic (CT) surgery, with changes in clinical, academic, and personal responsibilities. We hypothesized that the pandemic may disproportionately impact female academic CT surgeons, accentuating preexisting sex disparities. This study assessed sex differences in authorship of 2 major CT surgery journals during the early part of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods All accepted submissions to The Annals of Thoracic Surgery and The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery between April and August of 2019 and the same period in 2020 were reviewed. Article type and author characteristics were obtained from the journals. Author sex was predicted using a validated multinational database (Genderize.io) and verified with authors' institutional and public professional profiles. Results In total, 1106 submissions were accepted during the 2019 period, whereas 900 articles (18.6% decrease) were accepted during the same period in 2020. Original research articles comprised 33.3% of the 2019 articles but only 4.9% of the 2020 articles. Female authors contributed to 39.3% (23.1% original research and 16.2% nonoriginal articles) and 29.4% (3.3% original research and 26.1% nonoriginal articles) of articles during the 2019 and 2020 periods, respectively. This represents a marked change in the type of articles that female authors contributed to. Conclusions Early on during the COVID-19 pandemic, the type of articles accepted, and authorship demographic changed. There was a decrease in contribution of female-authored CT surgery articles submitted to both journals, especially for original research. Future research will elucidate the long-term impact of the pandemic on sex disparities in academic productivity. Video Graphical Sex differences in authorship of the 2 highest-impact CT surgery journals. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic (April to August of 2020), there was a change in the type of articles accepted and the authorship demographic, relative to the same period in 2019. Original research articles accepted to CT surgery journals declined whereas nonoriginal articles increased. Female authors contributed more to nonoriginal articles and less to original articles during the pandemic.

2.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(4): e237-e238, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382590
3.
J Surg Oncol ; 123(7): 1633-1639, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: For patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases, staged resections have historically been the preferred surgical intervention. During the spring of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic made patient travel to the hospital challenging and necessitated reduction in operative volume so that resources could be conserved. We report our experience with synchronous bilateral metastasectomies for the treatment of disease in both lungs. METHODS: Patients with bilateral pulmonary metastases who underwent simultaneous bilateral resections were compared with a cohort of patients who underwent staged resections. We used nearest-neighbor propensity score (1:1) matching to adjust for confounders. Perioperative outcomes were compared between groups using paired statistical analysis techniques. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2020, 36 patients underwent bilateral simultaneous metastasectomies. We matched 31 pairs of patients. The length of stay was significantly shorter in patients undergoing simultaneous resection (median 3 vs. 8 days, p < .001) and operative time was shorter (156 vs. 235.5 min, p < .001) when compared to the sum of both procedures in the staged group. The groups did not significantly differ with regard to postoperative complications. CONCLUSION: In a carefully selected patient population, simultaneous bilateral metastasectomy is a safe option. A single procedure confers benefits for both the patient as well as the hospital resource system.


Subject(s)
Lung Neoplasms/secondary , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Colorectal Neoplasms/pathology , Female , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Metastasectomy/methods , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Staging , Pneumonectomy/methods , Retrospective Studies , Thoracic Surgery, Video-Assisted/methods , Thoracotomy/methods
4.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 111(4): 1102-1110, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046575

ABSTRACT

As part of the response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, cardiothoracic training programs quickly transitioned midinterview season toward a virtual format. This monumental and rapid undertaking led to the adoption of novel virtual interviewing techniques, many of which have been developed and partially rolled out by other specialties for years. The COVID-19 pandemic is still here, and when the end will be in sight is unclear. However, most, if not all, of the novel interview techniques that were rapidly adopted by cardiothoracic training programs during the 2020 interview season will continue to be relevant even after the pandemic and need for social distancing subsides. In this literature review, we highlight techniques that can be used by cardiothoracic training programs to virtually showcase their attributes and strengths to give applicants as realistic of a view of the program as possible. Such efforts include developing and emphasizing a social media presence, expanding information within training program websites, broadcasting virtual educational content, and creating virtual tours. In addition, we will review approaches toward structuring a virtual interview day to provide candidates with a deeper glimpse into the inner workings of the program. We can use this opportunity provided by the COVID-19 pandemic to develop innovative methods of conducting fellowship interviews that may persist long into the future, as we consider limitations historically caused by finances, scheduling, clinical responsibilities, and family needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Internship and Residency/methods , Pandemics , Thoracic Surgery/education , Virtual Reality , Humans
5.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 2020 Sep 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-783340
6.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 161(3): 758-759, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693989
7.
Ann Surg ; 272(2): e106-e111, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647430

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To summarize the multi-specialty strategy and initial guidelines of a Case Review Committee in triaging oncologic surgery procedures in a large Comprehensive Cancer Center and to outline current steps moving forward after the initial wave. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: The impetus for strategic rescheduling of operations is multifactorial and includes our societal responsibility to minimize COVID-19 exposure risk and propagation among patients, the healthcare workforce, and our community at large. Strategic rescheduling is also driven by the need to preserve limited resources. As many states have already or are considering to re-open and relax stay-at-home orders, there remains a continued need for careful surgical scheduling because we must face the reality that we will need to co-exist with COVID-19 for months, if not years. METHODS: The quality officers, chairs, and leadership of the 9 surgical departments in our Division of Surgery provide specialty-specific approaches to appropriately triage patients. RESULTS: We present the strategic approach for surgical rescheduling during and immediately after the COVID-19 first wave for the 9 departments in the Division of Surgery at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer surgeons should continue to use their oncologic knowledge to determine the window of opportunity for each surgical procedure, based on tumor biology, preoperative treatment sequencing, and response to systemic therapy, to safely guide patients through this cautious recovery phase.


Subject(s)
Appointments and Schedules , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Surgical Oncology/trends , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Decision Making , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Selection , SARS-CoV-2 , Texas/epidemiology , Triage
8.
Ann Thorac Surg ; 110(6): 2107, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-343489
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