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1.
AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses ; 2021 Nov 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1475725

ABSTRACT

We explored experiences with telemedicine among persons with HIV (PWH) during the first wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A convenience sample of adults (>18 years) receiving care in an urban clinic in Atlanta were invited to participate. Patients completed a structured survey that assessed the usefulness, quality, satisfaction, and concerns with telemedicine services (telephone calls) received during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-May 2020). Demographic, plasma HIV-1 RNA, and CD4+ T cell count data were obtained through medical chart abstraction. Bootstrapped t-tests and chi-square tests were used to examine differences in patient experiences by age, sex, and race. Of 406 PWH contacted, 101 completed the survey (median age 55 years, 84% men, 77% Black, 98% virally suppressed, median CD4 count 572 cells/µL). The main HIV care disruptions experienced were delays in follow-up visits (40%), difficulty getting viral load measured (35%), and difficulty accessing antiretroviral therapy (21%). Participant ratings for quality (median score 6.5/7), usefulness (median score 6.0/7), and satisfaction (median score 6.3/7) with telemedicine were high. However, 28% of patients expressed concerns about providers' ability to examine them and about the lack of laboratory tests. More women had concerns about providers' ability to examine them (92% vs. 50%, p = .005) and about the safety of their personal information (69% vs. 23%, p = .002) compared with men. No age or race differences were observed. Although PWH are generally satisfied with telephone-based telemedicine, concerns with its use were notable, particularly among women. Future HIV telemedicine models should address these.

3.
AIDS ; 34(12): 1789-1794, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301407

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There are limited data describing the presenting characteristics and outcomes among US persons with HIV (PWH) requiring hospitalization for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: We performed a case series of all PWH sequentially admitted with COVID-19 from 8 March 2020 to 23 April 2020 at three hospitals in Atlanta, Georgia. Sociodemographic, clinical and HIV-associated characteristics were collected. RESULTS: Of 530 confirmed COVID-19 cases hospitalized during this period, 20 occurred among PWH (3.8%). The median age was 57 (Q1-Q3, 48-62) years, 65% were men, and 85% were non-Hispanic Black. Presenting median symptom duration was 5 (Q1-Q3, 3-7) days; cough (90%), fever (65%), malaise (60%) and dyspnea (60%) were most common. On admission, 40% of patients required oxygenation support and 65% had an abnormal chest radiograph. Median length of hospitalization was 5 (Q1-Q3, 4-12) days, 30% required intensive care, 15% required intubation, and 15% died. Median CD4 cell count prior to admission was 425 (Q1-Q3, 262-815) cells/µl and 90% of patients had HIV-1 RNA less than 200 copies/ml. Half of the patients had at least five comorbidities; hypertension (70%), dyslipidemia (60%) and diabetes (45%) were most prevalent. All three patients who died had CD4 cell count more than 200, HIV suppression and each had a total of five comorbidities. CONCLUSION: The multisite series in the Southern United States provides characteristics and early outcomes of hospitalized PWH with COVID-19. Nearly all patients had controlled HIV and a high comorbidity burden. Additional study of COVID-19 among PWH is needed to determine the role of age, comorbidities and HIV control in mediating COVID-19 presentation and its sequelae.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , CD4 Lymphocyte Count , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Georgia/epidemiology , HIV Infections/ethnology , HIV Infections/therapy , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies
4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(11): e828-e834, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249293

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Widespread viral and serological testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may present a unique opportunity to also test for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. We estimated the potential impact of adding linked, opt-out HIV testing alongside SARS-CoV-2 testing on the HIV incidence and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in 6 US cities. METHODS: Using a previously calibrated dynamic HIV transmission model, we constructed 3 sets of scenarios for each city: (1) sustained current levels of HIV-related treatment and prevention services (status quo); (2) temporary disruptions in health services and changes in sexual and injection risk behaviors at discrete levels between 0%-50%; and (3) linked HIV and SARS-CoV-2 testing offered to 10%-90% of the adult population in addition to Scenario 2. We estimated the cumulative number of HIV infections between 2020-2025 and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of linked HIV testing over 20 years. RESULTS: In the absence of linked, opt-out HIV testing, we estimated a total of a 16.5% decrease in HIV infections between 2020-2025 in the best-case scenario (50% reduction in risk behaviors and no service disruptions), and a 9.0% increase in the worst-case scenario (no behavioral change and 50% reduction in service access). We estimated that HIV testing (offered at 10%-90% levels) could avert a total of 576-7225 (1.6%-17.2%) new infections. The intervention would require an initial investment of $20.6M-$220.7M across cities; however, the intervention would ultimately result in savings in health-care costs in each city. CONCLUSIONS: A campaign in which HIV testing is linked with SARS-CoV-2 testing could substantially reduce the HIV incidence and reduce direct and indirect health care costs attributable to HIV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , HIV Infections , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Cities , Cost-Benefit Analysis , HIV , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2259-2261, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153153

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing and contact tracing have been proposed as critical components of a safe and effective coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) public health strategy. We argue that COVID-19 contact tracing may provide a unique opportunity to also conduct widespread HIV testing, among other health-promotion activities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Healthcare Disparities , COVID-19/prevention & control , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Humans , Mass Screening , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
6.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(2): ofaa583, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069289

ABSTRACT

One of the many challenges that has befallen the Infectious Diseases and Graduate Medical Education communities during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is the maintenance of continued effective education and training of the future leaders of our field. With the remarkable speed and innovation that has characterized the responses to this pandemic, educators everywhere have adapted existing robust and safe learning environments to meet the needs of our learners. This paper will review distinct aspects of education and training of the Infectious Diseases fellows we believe the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted most, including mentoring, didactics, and wellness. We anticipate that several strategies developed in this context and described herein will help to inform training and best practices during the pandemic and beyond.

7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 72(1): 9-14, 2021 01 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045878

ABSTRACT

The goal of the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative is to reduce new infections in the United States by 90% by 2030. Success will require fundamentally changing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention and care delivery to engage more persons with HIV and at risk of HIV in treatment. While the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic reduced in-person visits to care facilities and led to concern about interruptions in care, it also accelerated growth of alternative options, bolstered by additional funding support. These included the use of telehealth, medication delivery to the home, and increased flexibility facilitating access to Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program services. While the outcomes of these programs must be studied, many have improved accessibility during the pandemic. As the pandemic wanes, long-term policy changes are needed to preserve these options for those who benefit from them. These new care paradigms may provide a roadmap for progress for those with other chronic health issues as well.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , HIV Infections , HIV , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Policy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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