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1.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-8, 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036665

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 was declared a health emergency in March 2020, there was immense demand for information about the novel pathogen. This paper examines the clinician-reported impact of Project ECHO COVID-19 Clinical Rounds on clinician learning. Primary sources of study data were Continuing Medical Education (CME) Surveys for each session from the dates of March 24, 2020 to July 30, 2020 and impact surveys conducted in November 2020, which sought to understand participants' overall assessment of sessions. Quantitative analyses included descriptive statistics and Mann-Whitney testing. Qualitative data were analyzed through inductive thematic analysis. Clinicians rated their knowledge after each session as significantly higher than before that session. 75.8% of clinicians reported they would 'definitely' or 'probably' use content gleaned from each attended session and clinicians reported specific clinical and operational changes made as a direct result of sessions. 94.6% of respondents reported that COVID-19 Clinical Rounds helped them provide better care to patients. 89% of respondents indicated they 'strongly agree' that they would join ECHO calls again.COVID-19 Clinical Rounds offers a promising model for the establishment of dynamic peer-to-peer tele-mentoring communities for low or no-notice response where scientifically tested or clinically verified practice evidence is limited.

2.
Community Ment Health J ; 2022 Jul 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1919847

ABSTRACT

Mental health task shifting is a potential way to address the burgeoning treatment gap for mental illness. Easily available and accessible digital technology can be utilised to continuously engage grassroot level health workers (for example, Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs). However, the impact of such a strategy is not yet systematically evaluated. In this randomised controlled trial, longitudinal hybrid training of ASHAs [1 day in-person classroom training and seven online sessions (ECHO model), aimed to screen and refer to commonly prevalent mental health issues in communities] was compared with traditional one-day in-person classroom training. ASHAs (n = 75) from six Primary Health Centres in Ramanagara district, Karnataka, India were randomized into study (SG-ASHAs) and control (CG-ASHAs) groups. After excluding drop-outs, 26 ASHAs in each group were included in the final analysis of the scores on their Knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) in mental health. Two house-to-house surveys were conducted by both groups to identify and refer possible cases. The number of screen positives (potential persons with mental illnesses) and the KAP scores formed the outcome measures. Online sessions for SG-ASHAs were completed over 18 months, the COVID-19 pandemic being the main disruptor. SG-ASHAs identified significantly higher number of persons with potential alcohol use disorders [n = 873 (83%); p ≤ 0.001] and common mental disorders [n = 96(4%); p = 0.018], while CG-ASHAs identified significantly higher number of those with potential severe mental disorders [n = 61(61.61%); p ≤ 0.001]. As regards KAP, after controlling for baseline scores, the time effect in RMANOVA favoured SG-ASHAs. Mean total KAP score increased from 16.76 to18.57 (p < 0·01) in SG-ASHAs and from 18.65 to 18.84 (p = 0.76) in CG-ASHAs. However, the Time-group interaction effect did not favour either (F = 0.105; p = 0.748). Compared to traditional training, mentoring ASHAs for extended periods is more impactful. Easily accessible digital technology makes the latter feasible. Scaling up such initiatives carry the potential to considerably improve treatment access for those in need.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S98-S105, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315682

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has been an unprecedented global health challenge. Traditional modes of knowledge dissemination have not been feasible. A rapid solution was needed to share guidance and implementation examples within the global infection prevention and control (IPC) community. We designed the IPC Global Webinar Series to bring together subject matter experts and IPC professionals in the fight against COVID-19. METHODS: The Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes (ECHO) model was adapted to create an interactive global knowledge network. Speakers and panelists provided presentations and answers to questions. Webinars were simultaneously interpreted into 5 languages and recorded for later access. RESULTS: Thirteen webinar sessions were completed from 14 May through 6 August 2020. On average, 634 participants attended each session (range, 393-1181). Each session was represented by participants from, on average, more than 100 countries. CONCLUSIONS: Through the IPC Global Webinar Series, critical information was shared and peer-to-peer learning was promoted during the COVID-19 pandemic response. The webinar sessions reached a broader audience than many in-person events. The webinar series was rapidly scaled and can be rapidly reactivated as needed. Our lessons learned in designing and implementing the series can inform the design of other global health virtual knowledge networks. The continued and expanded use of adapted virtual communities of practice and other learning networks for the IPC community can serve as a valuable tool for addressing COVID-19 and other infectious disease threats.The infection prevention and control (IPC) Global Webinar Series convened subject matter experts and IPC professionals from more than 100 countries to establish a global learning community for COVID-19. We advocate for expanded use of virtual knowledge networks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Global Health , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Ann Emerg Med ; 78(2): 223-228, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188271

ABSTRACT

Tasked with identifying digital health solutions to support dynamic learning health systems and their response to COVID-19, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response partnered with the University of New Mexico's Project ECHO and more than 2 dozen other organizations and agencies to create a real-time virtual peer-to-peer clinical education opportunity: the COVID-19 Clinical Rounds Initiative. Focused on 3 "pressure points" in the COVID-19 continuum of care-(1) the out-of-hospital and/or emergency medical services setting, (2) emergency departments, and (3) inpatient critical care environments-the initiative has created a massive peer-to-peer learning network for real-time information sharing, engaging participants in all 50 US states and more than 100 countries. One hundred twenty-five learning sessions had been conducted between March 24, 2020 and February 25, 2021, delivering more than 58,000 total learner-hours of contact in the first 11 months of operation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Emergency Medical Services , Teaching Rounds/methods , Humans , Learning Curve , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Pan Afr Med J ; 37: 255, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069968

ABSTRACT

The Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has rapidly spread in Africa, with a total of 474,592 confirmed cases by 11th July 2020. Consequently, all policy makers and health workers urgently need to be trained and to access the most credible information to contain and mitigate its impact. While the need for rapid training and information dissemination has increased, most of Africa is implementing public health social and physical distancing measures. Responding to this context requires broad partnerships and innovative virtual approaches to disseminate new insights, share best practices, and create networked communities of practice for all teach, and all learn. The World Health Organization (WHO)-Africa region, in collaboration with the Extension for Community Health Outcome (ECHO) Institute at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNM HSC), the West Africa college of nurses and the East Central and Southern Africa college of physicians, private professional associations, academia and other partners has embarked on a virtual training programme to support the containment of COVID-19. Between 1st April 2020 and 10th July 2020, about 7,500 diverse health professionals from 172 locations in 58 countries were trained in 15 sessions. Participants were from diverse institutions including: central ministries of health, WHO country offices, provincial and district hospitals and private medical practitioners. A range of critical COVID-19 preparedness and response interventions have been reviewed and discussed. There is a high demand for credible information from credible sources about COVID-19. To mitigate the "epidemic of misinformation" partnerships for virtual trainings and information dissemination leveraging existing learning platforms and networks across Africa will augment preparedness and response to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Capacity Building , Information Dissemination/methods , Public Health , Africa/epidemiology , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics
6.
Public Health Rep ; 136(1): 39-46, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961218

ABSTRACT

Project ECHO (Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes) at the University of New Mexico is a telementoring program that uses videoconferencing technology to connect health care providers in underserved communities with subject matter experts. In March 2020, Project ECHO created 10 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) telementoring programs to meet the public health needs of clinicians and teachers living in underserved rural and urban regions of New Mexico. The newly created COVID-19 programs include 7 weekly sessions (Community Health Worker [in English and Spanish], Critical Care, Education, First-Responder Resiliency, Infectious Disease Office Hours, and Multi-specialty) and 3 one-day special sessions. We calculated the total number of attendees, along with the range and standard deviation, per session by program. Certain programs (Critical Care, Infectious Disease Office Hours, Multi-specialty) recorded the profession of attendees when available. The Project ECHO research team collected COVID-19 infection data by county from March 11 through May 31, 2020. During that same period, 9765 health care and general education professionals participated in the COVID-19 programs, and participants from 31 of 35 (89%) counties in New Mexico attended the sessions. Our initial evaluation of these programs demonstrates that an interprofessional clinician group and teachers used the Project ECHO network to build a community of practice and social network while meeting their educational and professional needs. Because of Project ECHO's large reach, the results of the New Mexico COVID-19 response suggest that the rapid use of ECHO telementoring could be used for other urgent national public health problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Community Health Services/organization & administration , Health Personnel/education , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Mentoring/organization & administration , Rural Population , Community Health Services/standards , Community Health Workers/education , Evidence-Based Practice , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Medically Underserved Area , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Urban Population , Videoconferencing
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