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2.
Antimicrobial Stewardship and Healthcare Epidemiology ; 2(S1):s34-s35, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2184946

ABSTRACT

Background: Singapore General Hospital (SGH) is the largest acute tertiary-care hospital in Singapore. Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at risk of acquiring COVID-19 in both the community and workplaces. SGH has a robust exposure management process including prompt contact tracing, immediate ring fencing, lock down of affected cubicles or single room isolation for patient contacts, and home isolation orders for staff contacts of COVID-19 cases during the containment phase of the pandemic. Contacts were also placed on enhanced surveillance with PCR testing on days 1 and 4 as well as daily antigen rapid tests (ARTs) for 10 days after exposure. Here, we describe the characteristic of HCWs with COVID-19 during the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This retrospective observational study included all SGH HCWs who acquired COVID-19 during the third wave (ie, the 18-week period from September 1 to December 31, 2021) of the COVID-19 pandemic. Univariate analysis was used to compare characteristics of work-associated infection (WAI) and community-acquired infection (CAI) among HCWs. Results: Among a workforce of >10,000 at SGH, 335 HCWs acquired COVID-19 during study period. CAI (exposure to known clusters or household contact) accounted for 111 HCW infections (33.1%). Also, 48 HCWs (14.3%) had a WAI (ie, acquired at their work places where there was no patient contact). Among WAsI, only 5 HCWs had hospital-acquired infection (confirmed by phylogenetic analysis). The sources of exposure for the remaining 176 HCWs were unknown. Weekly incidence of COVID-19 among HCWs was comparable to the epidemiology curve of all cases in Singapore (Fig. 1 and 2). The mean age of HCWs with COVID-19 was 39.6 years, and most were women. At the time of positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR test, 223 HCWs were symptomatic, and 67 (20.0%) of them had comorbidities. Only 16 HCWs (4.8%) required hospitalization, and all recovered fully with no mortality (Table 1). Being female was associated with community COVID-19 acquisition (OR, 4.6, P Conclusions: During the thrid wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, a higher percentage of HCWs at SGH acquired the infection from the community than from the workplace. Safe management measures, such as universal masking, social distancing, and robust exposure management processes including prompt contact tracing and environmental disinfection, can reduce the risk of COVID-19 in the hospital work environment.Funding: NoneDisclosures: None

3.
American Journal of Infection Control ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2085866

ABSTRACT

Background Temporary isolation wards have been introduced to meet demands for airborne-infection-isolation-rooms (AIIRs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Environmental sampling and outbreak investigation was conducted in temporary isolation wards converted from general wards and/or prefabricated containers, in order to evaluate the ability of such temporary isolation wards to safely manage COVID-19 cases over a period of sustained use. Methods Environmental sampling for SARS-CoV-2 RNA was conducted in temporary isolation ward rooms constructed from pre-fabricated containers (N = 20) or converted from normal-pressure general wards (N = 47). Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was utilized to ascertain health care-associated transmission when clusters were reported amongst HCWs working in isolation areas from July 2020 to December 2021. Results A total of 355 environmental swabs were collected;22.4% (15/67) of patients had at least one positive environmental sample. Patients housed in temporary isolation ward rooms constructed from pre-fabricated containers (adjusted-odds-ratio, aOR = 10.46, 95% CI = 3.89-58.91, P = .008) had greater odds of detectable environmental contamination, with positive environmental samples obtained from the toilet area (60.0%, 12/20) and patient equipment, including electronic devices used for patient communication (8/20, 40.0%). A single HCW cluster was reported amongst staff working in the temporary isolation ward constructed from pre-fabricated containers;however, health care-associated transmission was deemed unlikely based on WGS and/or epidemiological investigations. Conclusion Environmental contamination with SARS-CoV-2 RNA was observed in temporary isolation wards, particularly from the toilet area and smartphones used for patient communication. However, despite intensive surveillance, no healthcare-associated transmission was detected in temporary isolation wards over 18 months of prolonged usage, demonstrating their capacity for sustained use during succeeding pandemic waves.

4.
Infection, Disease & Health ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2061245

ABSTRACT

Background Increased transmissibility of severe-acute-respiratory-syndrome-coronavirus-2(SARS-CoV-2) variants, such as the Omicron-variant, presents an infection-control challenge. We contrasted nosocomial transmission amongst hospitalized inpatients across successive pandemic waves attributed to the Delta- and Omicron variants, over a 9-month period in which enhanced-infection-prevention-measures were constantly maintained. Methods Enhanced-infection-prevention-measures in-place at a large tertiary hospital included universal N95-usage, routine-rostered-testing (RRT) for all inpatient/healthcare-workers (HCWs), rapid-antigen-testing (RAT) for visitors, and outbreak-investigation coupled with enhanced-surveillance (daily-testing) of exposed patients. The study-period lasted from 21st June 2021-21st March 2022. Chi-square test and multivariate-logistic-regression was utilized to identify factors associated with onward transmission and 28d-mortality amongst inpatient cases of hospital-onset COVID-19. Results During the Delta-wave, hospital-onset cases formed 2.7% (47/1727) of all COVID-19 cases requiring hospitalisation;in contrast, hospital onset-cases formed a greater proportion (17.7%, 265/1483;odds-ratio, OR=7.78, 95%CI=5.65-10.70) during the Omicron-wave, despite universal N95-usage and other enhanced infection-prevention measures that remained unchanged. The odds of 28d-mortality were higher during the Delta-wave compared to the Omicron-wave (27.7%, 13/47, vs. 10.6%, 28/265, adjusted-odds-ratio, aOR=2.78, 95%CI=1.02-7.69). Onward-transmission occurred in 21.2% (66/312) of hospital-onset cases;being on enhanced-surveillance (daily-testing) was independently associated with lower odds of onward-transmission (aOR=0.18, 95%CI=0.09-0.38) Conclusion A surge of hospital-onset COVID-19 cases was encountered during the Omicron-wave, despite continuation of enhanced infection-prevention measures;mortality amongst hospital-onset cases was reduced. The Omicron variant poses an infection-control challenge in contrast to Delta;surveillance is important especially in settings where infrastructural limitations make room-sharing unavoidable, despite the high risk of transmission.

6.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 7(5)2022 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862900

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, distinguishing dengue from COVID-19 in endemic areas can be difficult, as both may present as undifferentiated febrile illness. COVID-19 cases may also present with false-positive dengue serology. Hospitalisation protocols for managing undifferentiated febrile illness are essential in mitigating the risk from both COVID-19 and dengue. METHODS: At a tertiary hospital contending with COVID-19 during a dengue epidemic, a triage strategy of routine COVID-19 testing for febrile patients with viral prodromes was used. All febrile patients with viral prodromes and no epidemiologic risk for COVID-19 were first admitted to a designated ward for COVID-19 testing, from January 2020 to December 2021. RESULTS: A total of 6103 cases of COVID-19 and 1251 cases of dengue were managed at our institution, comprising a total of 3.9% (6103/155,452) and 0.8% (1251/155,452) of admissions, respectively. A surge in dengue hospitalisations in mid-2020 corresponded closely with the imposition of a community-wide lockdown. A total of 23 cases of PCR-proven COVID-19 infection with positive dengue serology were identified, of whom only two were true co-infections; both had been appropriately isolated upon admission. Average length-of-stay for dengue cases initially admitted to isolation during the pandemic was 8.35 days (S.D. = 6.53), compared with 6.91 days (S.D. = 8.61) for cases admitted outside isolation (1.44 days, 95%CI = 0.58-2.30, p = 0.001). Pre-pandemic, only 1.6% (9/580) of dengue cases were admitted initially to isolation-areas; in contrast, during the pandemic period, 66.6% (833/1251) of dengue cases were initially admitted to isolation-areas while awaiting the results of SARS-CoV-2 testing. CONCLUSIONS: During successive COVID-19 pandemic waves in a dengue-endemic country, coinfection with dengue and COVID-19 was uncommon. Routine COVID-19 testing for febrile patients with viral prodromes mitigated the potential infection-prevention risk from COVID-19 cases, albeit with an increased length-of-stay for dengue hospitalizations admitted initially to isolation.

7.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; : 1-5, 2022 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815396

ABSTRACT

Sporadic clusters of healthcare-associated coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) occurred despite intense rostered routine surveillance and a highly vaccinated healthcare worker (HCW) population, during a community surge of the severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) B.1.617.2 δ (delta) variant. Genomic analysis facilitated timely cluster detection and uncovered additional linkages via HCWs moving between clinical areas and among HCWs sharing a common lunch area, enabling early intervention.

9.
Am J Infect Control ; 50(4): 465-468, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1653966

ABSTRACT

Sporadic clusters of health care-associated COVID-19 infection occurred in a highly vaccinated health care-workers and patient population, over a 3-month period during ongoing community transmission of the B.1.617.2 variant. Enhanced infection-prevention measures and robust surveillance systems, including routine-rostered-testing of all inpatients and staff and usage of N95-respirators in all clinical areas, were insufficient in achieving zero health care-associated transmission. The unvaccinated and immunocompromised remain at-risk and should be prioritized for enhanced surveillance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Inpatients , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Open forum infectious diseases ; 8(Suppl 1):S298-S298, 2021.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1602399

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light the importance of contact tracing in outbreak management. Digital technologies have been leveraged to enhance contact tracing in community settings. However, within complex hospital environments, where patient and staff movement and interpersonal interactions are central to care delivery, tools for contact tracing and cluster detection remain limited. We aimed to develop a system to promptly, identify contacts in infectious disease exposures and detect infectious disease clusters. Methods We prototyped a 3D mapping tool 3-Dimensional Disease Outbreak Surveillance System (3D-DOSS), to have a spatial representation of patients in the hospital inpatient locations. Based on the AutoCAD drawings, the hospital physical spaces are built within a game-development software to obtain accurate digital replicas. This concept borrows from the way gamers interact with the virtual world/space, to mimic the interactions in physical space, like the SIMS franchise. Clinical, laboratory and patient movement data is then integrated into the virtual map to develop syndromic and disease surveillance systems. Risk assignment to individuals exposed is through mathematical modeling based on distance coordinates, room type and ventilation parameters and whether the disease is transmitted via contact, droplet or airborne route. Results We have mapped acute respiratory illness (ARI) data for the period September to December 2018. We identified an influenza cluster of 10 patients in November 2018. In a COVID-19 exposure involving a healthcare worker (HCW), we identified 44 primary and 162 secondary contacts who were then managed as per our standard exposure management protocols. MDRO outbreaks could also be mapped. Conclusion Through early identification of at-risk contacts and detection of infectious disease clusters, the system can potentially facilitate interventions to prevent onward transmission. The system can also support security, environmental cleaning, bed assignment and other operational processes. Simulations of novel diseases outbreaks can enhance preparedness planning as health systems that had been better prepared have been more resilient in this current pandemic. Disclosures All Authors: No reported disclosures

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