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1.
The Lancet ; 399, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1921469

ABSTRACT

Background Online learning has been shown to have a significant effect on education in the 21st century, and it has become indispensable in nursing education because of the requirement to connect theoretical courses with hospital-based practice. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, education has shifted abruptly away from traditional face-to-face instruction and towards distance learning. This study explores the experience of online education during COVID-19 from the perspectives of nursing educators, graduate students, and undergraduate students in two universities in the occupied Palestinian territory Method A qualitative study adopting focus group interviews as a data collection method was conducted from September to October, 2020, in two Palestinian universities : Birzeit University in Ramallah city and Arab American University in Jenin city. A homogeneous purposeful sampling strategy was adopted to recruit participants. The data were analysed using an inductive thematic analysis. Ethical approval for the research was obtained from the ethics committees of both universities. Findings Seven focus groups were conducted. Of these, four focus groups involved undergraduate students (n=30), one involved postgraduate students (n=9), and two involved nursing educators (n=14). The nursing educators and students reported that they faced several challenges when they were required to switch to online learning. The participants perceived online education to be inefficient, particularly for clinical courses, because they perceived difficulties in providing nursing students with the necessary skills in practice. In addition, they reported that a lack of resources harmed the students’ ability to receive a high-quality health nursing education. Some undergraduate students mentioned that when they abruptly switched to online education, certain essential resources such as the internet, library, books, smartphones, laptops, and a quiet environment were unavailable. Furthermore, nursing educators and students perceived the lack of face-to-face interaction imposed by the abrupt shift to online education as a substantial challenge. Nursing educators reported that they encountered difficulties with student evaluation. They recognised that online examinations are not as valid as those held on campus as they believed that grades had been inflated as a result of students utilising alternative online resources to answer exam questions. Finally, home environments were viewed as a barrier, adding to the difficulty of transitioning from the university to the home environment. Interpretation Continuous training of educators is imperative for increasing the use of communication and technology in nursing education. There is a need for updated policies to avoid the perceived negative consequences of online learing and to maximise its benefits. The findings suggest some solutions to overcome these challenges. For example, preparing the nursing educators and students to use technology could relieve the magnitude of the problems that arise when a sudden switch to online education occurs. Funding None.

2.
EuropePMC; 2022.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-330722

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age =17.2 ±0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, and income), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, albeit strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

3.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(3)2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731998

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with the social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age = 17.2 ± 0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, and income), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, although strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

4.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-328504

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of internet gaming disorders (IGD) is considerably high among youth, especially with social isolation imposed by the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. IGD adversely affects mental health, quality of life, and academic performance. The Internet Gaming Disorder Scale (IGDS9-SF) is designed to detect IGD according to DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. However, inconsistent results are reported on its capacity to diagnose IGD evenly across different cultures. To ensure the suitability of the IGDS9-SF as a global measure of IGD, this study examined the psychometric properties of the IGDS9-SF in a sample of Sri Lankan university students (N = 322, mean age =17.2 ±0.6, range = 16-18 years, 56.5% males) and evaluated its measurement invariance across samples from Sri Lanka, Turkey, Australia, and the USA. Among Sri Lankan students, a unidimensional structure expressed good fit, invariance across different groups (gender, ethnicity, income, etc.), adequate criterion validity (strong correlation with motives of internet gaming, daily gaming duration, and sleep quality), and good reliability (alpha = 0.81). Males and online multiplayers expressed higher IGD levels, greater time spent gaming, and more endorsement of gaming motives (e.g., Social and Coping) than females and offline players. Across countries, the IGDS9-SF was invariant at the configural, metric, and scalar levels, albeit strict invariance was not maintained. The lowest and highest IGD levels were reported among Turkish and American respondents, respectively. In conclusion, the IGDS9-SF can be reliably used to measure IGD among Sri Lankan youth. Because the scale holds scalar invariance across countries, its scores can be used to compare IGD levels in the studied countries.

5.
J Pediatr Nurs ; 58: e74-e80, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060226

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aimed to investigate the experiences of parents who care for children diagnosed with leukaemia. This paper is focused solely on reporting the interview findings from participating mothers regarding the challenges of caring for children with leukaemia in the context of the COVID-19. DESIGN AND METHODS: The study took place in a Jordanian hospital where a descriptive qualitative design approach was applied on one oncology floor and an oncology clinic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with mothers of children aged 1-12 with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Inductive thematic analysis approach was undertaken. Written consent was obtained from all participants. RESULTS: Fifteen interviews were conducted with fifteen mothers. Four major themes reflect the different challenges parents and children face during the COVID-19 pandemic: children refusing to wear masks, social isolation, family relationship and financial concerns. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of the current study present important data for health care professionals to help them understand the challenges faced by parents and children with leukaemia, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: This study suggests activating emotional support teams in hospitals. These teams can actively help mothers express their concerns and worries which might otherwise foster self-blame, guilt and isolation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leukemia , Child , Female , Humans , Leukemia/therapy , Mothers , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
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