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1.
Front Digit Health ; 3: 639827, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497043

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a huge burden on the healthcare industry worldwide. Pressures to increase the isolation healthcare facility to cope with the growing number of patients led to an exploration of the use of wearables for vital signs monitoring among stable COVID-19 patients. Vital signs wearables were chosen for use in our facility with the purpose of reducing patient contact and preserving personal protective equipment. The process of deciding on the wearable solution as well as the implementation of the solution brought much insight to the team. This paper presents an overview of factors to consider in implementing a vital signs wearable solution. This includes considerations before deciding on whether or not to use a wearable device, followed by key criteria of the solution to assess. With the use of wearables rising in popularity, this serves as a guide for others who may want to implement it in their institutions.

2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480457

ABSTRACT

AIM: The long-term stress, anxiety and job burnout experienced by healthcare workers (HCWs) are important to consider as the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic stresses healthcare systems globally. The primary objective was to examine the changes in the proportion of HCWs reporting stress, anxiety, and job burnout over six months during the peak of the pandemic in Singapore. The secondary objective was to examine the extent that objective job characteristics, HCW-perceived job factors, and HCW personal resources were associated with stress, anxiety, and job burnout. METHOD: A sample of HCWs (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals, administrative and operations staff; N = 2744) was recruited via invitation to participate in an online survey from four tertiary hospitals. Data were gathered between March-August 2020, which included a 2-month lockdown period. HCWs completed monthly web-based self-reported assessments of stress (Perceived Stress Scale-4), anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and job burnout (Physician Work Life Scale). RESULTS: The majority of the sample consisted of female HCWs (81%) and nurses (60%). Using random-intercept logistic regression models, elevated perceived stress, anxiety and job burnout were reported by 33%, 13%, and 24% of the overall sample at baseline respectively. The proportion of HCWs reporting stress and job burnout increased by approximately 1·0% and 1·2% respectively per month. Anxiety did not significantly increase. Working long hours was associated with higher odds, while teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were associated with lower odds, of stress, anxiety, and job burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived stress and job burnout showed a mild increase over six months, even after exiting the lockdown. Teamwork and feeling appreciated at work were protective and are targets for developing organizational interventions to mitigate expected poor outcomes among frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Singapore/epidemiology
4.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(5): 1220-1227, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1041906

ABSTRACT

AIM: To understand the impact of COVID-19 on isolation bed capacity requirements, nursing workforce requirements and nurse:patient ratios. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 created an increased demand for isolation beds and nursing workforce globally. METHODS: This was a retrospective review of bed capacity, bed occupancy and nursing workforce data from the isolation units of a tertiary hospital in Singapore from 23 January 2020 to 31 May 2020. R v4.0.1 and Tidyverse 1.3.0 library were used for data cleaning and plotly 4.9.2.1 library for data visualization. RESULTS: In January to March 2020, isolation bed capacity was low (=<203 beds). A sharp increase in bed capacity was seen from 195 to 487 beds during 25 March to 29 April 2020, after which it plateaued. Bed occupancy remained lower than bed capacity throughout January to May 2020. After 16 April 2020, we experienced a shortage of 1.1 to 70.2 nurses in isolation wards. Due to low occupancy rates, nurse:patient ratio remained acceptable (minimum nurse:patient ratio = 0.26). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 caused drastic changes in isolation bed capacity and nursing workforce requirements. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Building a model to predict nursing workforce requirements during pandemic surges may be helpful for planning and adequate staffing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore , Workforce
5.
World J Clin Cases ; 8(10): 1763-1766, 2020 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-593968

ABSTRACT

With strict measures in place to contain the spread of coronavirus disease 2019, many have been isolated as suspected or confirmed cases. Being isolated causes much inconvenience for the patients and family. Patients' and next-of-kins' needs and concerns during isolation will be shared together with suggestions for key process improvements. Our hospital's Senior Patient Experience Managers contact all patients admitted to the isolation wards on a daily basis to provide some form of support. Common issues raised were gathered and strategies to help with their needs and concerns were discussed. Being in isolation is a challenging period for both patients and family. Nonetheless, we can implement measures to mitigate against the adverse effects of isolation. Patient education, effective and efficient means of communication, close monitoring for signs of distress and anxiety, and early intervention could help patients cope better with the whole isolation experience. Nursing management may want to consider implementing the measures shared in the article to manage patient's stress while not compromising on staff safety.

6.
Infect Dis Health ; 25(3): 216-218, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197672

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has an overwhelming impact on the nursing profession. Nurses play a vital role before and during pandemics, with nurse leaders taking the lead in preparation for outbreaks. In response to an outbreak, early recognition and preparation for the increasing threat, managing staffing challenges together with the well-being of nurses are of utmost importance. Strategies to promote physical distancing while not compromising continuing nursing education and patient care are also essential. With prompt actions and coordinated efforts, risk of spreading the virus within the healthcare sector can be kept at the minimum. As nurses are in the frontline of healthcare, their confidence in being well-supported by the hospital should be maintained. This case report describes the preparation and response of the nurses in Singapore General Hospital to the COVID-19 outbreak in Singapore.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , COVID-19/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Disease Outbreaks , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Humans , Nurses , Physical Distancing , Pneumonia, Viral , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapore/epidemiology
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