Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
2.
Non-conventional in English | National Technical Information Service, Grey literature | ID: grc-753595

ABSTRACT

Since the spread of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was designated as a pandemic by the World Health Organization, health care systems have been forced to adapt rapidly to defer less urgent care during the crisis.The United States (U.S.) has adopted a four-phase approach to decreasing and then resuming non-essential work. Through strong restrictive measures, Phase I slowed the spread of disease, allowing states to safely diagnose, isolate, and treat patients with COVID-19. In support of social distancing measures, non-urgent studies were postponed, and this created a backlog. Now, as states transition to Phase II, restrictions on non-essential activities will ease, and radiology departments must re-establish care while continuing to mitigate the risk ofCOVID-19 transmission all while accommodating this backlog. In this article, we propose a roadmap that incorporates the current practice guidelines and subject matter consensus statements for the phased reopening of non-urgent and elective radiology services. This roadmap will focus on operationalizing these recommendations for patient care and workforce management. Tiered systems are proposed for the prioritization of elective procedures, with physician-to-physician communication encouraged. Infection control methods, provision of personal protective equipment (PPE), and physical distancingmeasures are highlighted. Finally, changes in hours of operation, hiring strategies, and remote reading servicesare discussed for their potential to ease the transition to normal operations.

3.
Jcpsp-Journal of the College of Physicians and Surgeons Pakistan ; 31(7):S112-S116, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1543111

ABSTRACT

Novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has produced profound effects on the global healthcare systems including every specialty. Pregnant women are physiologically immunocompromised and may be affected more by the pandemic than the general population. New and unique challenges were encountered by hospitals and healthcare providers (HCPs) related to medical, surgical and strategic management involved in obstetric care. Data of obstetric patients presenting in labour and delivery unit from April to July 2020 was studied. In all 533 patients presented, 46 (8.6%) were COVID-19 positive. Overall, 41% cesarean sections were performed with one mortality and one COVID-19-positive neonate. The challenges faced by HCPs regarding delivery of care and collective successive measures taken to overcome those challenges as well as challenges faced by patients related to healthcare provision are also addressed. Strategies adopted for timely intervention to overcome those challenges were implemented for smooth and safe care to all patients and staff. We believe that planning and preparing proactively is the key to address any pandemic like COVID-19.

5.
European Journal of Public Health ; 31, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1514559

ABSTRACT

The SARS-COV-02 pandemic has globally resulted in a number of policies and interventions to address and reduce the transmission of the disease throughout the population. Mitigation measures have ranged from ‘Staying at Home' or ‘Lockdowns' to social distancing policies and requirements to work from home when you can. Whilst there are a number of papers which discuss the effects of home or remote working on employees and their families the large scale shift, accelerated pace and wider impacts of such a shift has not been well explored in the literature or has been focussed on specific topics, for example, productivity. HIA is promoted as a beneficial tool to identify the wider impacts of a policy, plan or intervention across a population and as such is well placed to examine and articulate who in a population may be affected and how, and the inequalities that may be created by an intervention such as home working. Using the lens of social determinants and equity focussed-HIA, this work examines the wider impact of home working in Wales during the COVID-19 pandemic. It provides a coherent overview of the major impacts on health and the particular populations affected. It articulates the process followed, the key evidence based findings, discusses the gaps in the evidence base that require further exploration and the impact and influence it has had to date. Finally, it shares the transferable learning, which will be of use to researchers, policy and decision makers, organisations and public health agencies.

6.
Pakistan Journal of Medical and Health Sciences ; 15(5):1482-1484, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1315214

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc throughout the world, with 150 million cases to date and over 3 million lives claimed worldwide. Objectives: To explore the impact of the Covid-19 lockdown on psychological health parameters i.e. depression, anxiety and stress as well as on body mass index among medical students studying in a private medical college in Pakistan. Study Design: Experimental study. Methodology: This study with enrolled students (n=233) was carried out after ethical review committee’s (ERC) approval at CMH Kharian Medical College (CKMC), Physiology Department, Kharian-Pakistan. Both male and female medical students were enrolled. In phase 1, the students reported to the Physiology laboratory where age and gender were recorded. The pre-lockdown readings of BMI and DASS-21(Depression, Anxiety, Stress) scale were taken. In phase-2, the post-lockdown readings of BMI and DASS-21 scale were taken once the students returned to campus. Statistical analysis: Data was analyzed by SPSS software, version 21. BMI and DASS-21 score were presented as mean + SD. Statistical significance was taken at p value <0.05. Results: In present study, results showed that there was a decrease in level of depression post-Covid-19-lockdown among enrolled subjects with significant p-values (0.019*) in the pre and post covid-19-lockdown comparison. Conclusion: We concluded that significant difference was seen between Pre & Post Covid-19-lockdown depression with p-value of <0.019. However, insignificant difference was seen between Pre & Post Covid-19-lockdown anxiety and stress with p-value of >0.05. Key Words: Covid-19 lockdown, Medical students, Depression, BMI and Anxiety.

7.
Rheumatology (United Kingdom) ; 60(SUPPL 1):i48, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1266178

ABSTRACT

Background/AimsDuring the peak of COVID-19 pandemic, there were growingconcerns that rheumatology patients could have an increased risk ofcontracting coronavirus due to the immunosuppressive drugs that theywere taking. British Society for Rheumatology (BSR) recommended inits risk stratification guide in March 2020 that vulnerable patientsshould be either shielded or isolated according to their level of risk.The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the compliance to the riskstratification advice among rheumatology patients in a single centre.MethodsRisk stratification guidance was sent out to 401 patients recommending either to shield or to isolate. Patients were contacted over thetelephone between 14 September and 18 October 2020 to ensure theyhad received a postal letter with risk stratification advice. If received, itwas checked whether they had followed the guidance. Responsesreceived from all participants were analysed.Results93% (373) of patients confirmed that they had received the guidance;however, 8 patients suggested they hadn't received and we wereunable to contact 16 patients, despite trying multiple times. Fourpatients died but they did not have confirmed coronavirus. 267confirmed they were shielding and 83 were isolating, but 21 patientsdecided not to follow the guidance despite the recommendation andtwo patients stopped taking the drugs due to fear of contracting thecoronavirus. Total 258 females and 143 males with the mean age 59.Most common diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis (227), psoriaticarthritis (97) and axial spondyloarthritis (59). It was noted that out of 7patients who had symptoms suggestive of COVID-19, only threepatients were confirmed to have COVID-19 positive PCR test. Threemost commonly used drugs were Benepali (128) followed by Amjevita(100), then Rituximab (56).ConclusionAlthough uptake of postal communication was high in this study, it wasdifficult to establish how rapidly the guidance was delivered. Werealise the need to employ better ways of communicating with thepatients. Innovative ways such as text messaging and social mediahave an important role in the delivery of a rapid mass communicationduring the pandemic. It was reassuring to note that only a very smallnumber of patients had COVID-19 among the patients who followedthe government advice to either shield or isolate. But, it would beinteresting to see whether the incidence of COVID-19 cases rise sincerheumatology patients are no longer shielding.

8.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):59, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238394

ABSTRACT

Aims: Historically the National Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP) has low retention rates which are accentuated in the BAME population. We aimed to design and deliver a fun, alternative type 2 diabetes prevention programme that would have an increased retention rate and increase participant's physical activity levels. The Diabetes Prevention Decathlon (DPD) structured education programme featured;weekly health and well-being workshops and physical activity sessions, gamification and the use of a mobile phone application that incentivised continued physical activity between sessions. Method: An innovation grant awarded the opportunity for collaboration between multiple partners within the NHS, public health, community charities, patient groups, and a digital enterprise. This resulted in the creation of the DPD which was piloted in a deprived South West London borough. The inclusion criteria for participants included a HbA1c between 42 and 47 mmol/mol (6.0-6.4%), indicative for non-diabetic hypoglycaemia. Referrals, retention rates, weight loss and physical activity data were recorded over the ten-week programme alongside key demographic markers. Results: With an 87% completion rate (n31), 39 kg group weight loss and 40% increase in activity levels, the programme yielded excellent results compared to the NDPP. Semi-structured interviews highlighted the importance of group interactions and regular opportunities to be physically active. Positive but unplanned outcomes were the high BAME uptake of 77% and subsequent retention 67%, and covid driven agile conversion to virtual delivery. Conclusions: The DPD successfully piloted a new and fun approach to diabetes prevention with further intentions to work with local communities to increase and improve BAME resources.

9.
Diabetic Medicine ; 38(SUPPL 1):68-69, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1238381

ABSTRACT

Aims: The covid-19 pandemic has brought many challenges to medical training and education. Clinical guidelines are an important resource especially for redeployed healthcare professionals (HCPs) to manage diabetes emergencies. Our aim is to understand how non-specialist HCPs prefer the diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyper-glycaemic state (HHS) guidelines to be presented to improve accessibility and adherence. Methods: An online survey was conducted in January 2021, using a QR code to access the survey via digital platforms including email, posters and MS teams. Results: Among the 101 responders, 42% were core-medical or trust-grade doctors, 22% foundation year 1 doctors, 17% higher specialty trainees and the remainder nurses, healthcare assistants, pharmacists and consultants. Despite online access to national-based trust diabetes guidelines, only 17% of surveyed HCPs were confident in prescribing and administering treatment for DKA or HHS. 92% responders had managed DKA or HHS more than once in the last 6 months. Despite the majority (88%) knowing where to access the current guidelines, only 13% of prescribing responders followed the guideline in prescribing regular basal insulin with fixed-rate intravenous insulin infusion. 88% preferred a pre-printed proforma of the guideline with examples of model prescriptions. Most useful features rated were flowcharts (76%), checklists (72%), criteria for escalation (62%) and model prescriptions (58%). Guidance on fluid management, especially in renal and heart failure, was most frequently requested. Conclusions: An online survey with QR code access has facilitated a good response and has allowed diabetes emergency guidelines to be tailored to the needs of non-specialists during the covid-19 pandemic.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL