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1.
OTO Open ; 5(2): 2473974X211014130, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242226

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study include characterizing the practice patterns and testing strategies of facial plastic and reconstructive surgery (FPRS) fellowship directors (FDs) secondary to COVID-19 and to quantify the impact of COVID-19 on FPRS fellowship training. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Online. METHODS: A survey was sent to all American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery FDs and co-FDs in September 2020. Descriptive analyses were performed. RESULTS: Of 77 eligible FDs, 45 responded (58.4%) representing a diverse group across the United States. All but 1 FD routinely screened patients for COVID-19 in the preoperative setting. FDs largely believed that universal preoperative testing was cost-effective (66.7%), improved patient safety (80.0%) and health care worker safety (95.6%), and was not burdensome for patients (53.3%). With regard to volume of cosmetic/aesthetic, reconstructive, facial nerve, and trauma surgery, FDs indicated largely no change in volume (34.9%, 71.0%, 68.4%, and 80.0%, respectively) or fellow experience (67.4%, 80.6%, 84.2%, and 80.0%). Half (50.0%) of the FDs reported decreased volume of congenital/craniofacial surgery, but 75.0% did not believe that there was a change in fellow experience. Overall, of the 15 responses indicating "worsened training" across all domains of FPRS, 14 were located in the Northeast (93.33%). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had the least impact on the volume of reconstructive procedures, facial nerve operations, and trauma surgery and a negative impact on congenital/craniofacial surgery volume, and it has accelerated the demand for cosmetic/aesthetic operations. Overall, the majority of FDs did not feel as though their fellows' trainings would be adversely affected by the ongoing pandemic.

2.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 22(6): 464-470, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-861976

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The objectives of this study among facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons (FPRS), include (1) quantifying the use of telemedicine, (2) examining the impact of novel coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) on telemedicine practices, (3) highlighting the types of telemedicine employed, (4) anticipating how telemedicine will be utilized in the future, and (5) describing FPRS' attitudes and understanding of telemedicine technologies. Study Type: Cross-sectional survey. Methods: A 6-13 question survey was sent to the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery membership. Descriptive analyses were performed, along with a Fisher's exact test. Results: We received 100 responses from a diverse group of surgeons across the United States. Overall, 91% of responders utilize telemedicine, of which 76.9% began during the COVID-19 pandemic. 33.3% of responders thought that their platforms were not Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant or were unsure. Of those that utilize telemedicine, the two biggest concerns were difficulties with physical examination (69.2%) and lack of human connection (44%). 75.8% of telemedicine utilizers plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice moving forward. Of all responders, 71% believed that telemedicine will have a positive effect on the field of FPRS, although on univariate analysis those in practice >20 years were more likely to believe that there will be no effect or a negative effect (p = 0.014). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated the adoption of telemedicine among FPRS in the United States. The great majority of responders plan to incorporate telemedicine into their practice even after the pandemic subsides and believe that telemedicine will have a net positive effect on the field of FPRS.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Perioperative Care/trends , Pneumonia, Viral , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Surgery, Plastic/trends , Telemedicine/trends , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Perioperative Care/methods , Surgeons , Surgery, Plastic/methods , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/methods , United States
3.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 164(5): 909-910, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-817955

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use among otolaryngologists-head and neck surgeons and facial plastic and reconstructive surgeons has accelerated as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, it is unclear what impact the increased adoption of telehealth will have on the doctor-patient relationship, patients' perceptions of individual practices, and the likelihood of patients proceeding with the next steps toward surgery. While an understanding of these complex questions is imperative for all otolaryngologists, it is extremely important for facial plastic surgeons who focus on elective procedures, particularly cosmetic/aesthetic operations. The use of telemedicine has the potential to reduce bias among patients seeking facial plastic surgery, especially cosmetic procedures. As reports of this phenomenon are anecdotal thus far, we recommend further study into the specific criteria that patients consider when selecting a facial plastic surgeon.


Subject(s)
Bias , COVID-19/epidemiology , Face/surgery , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Telemedicine , Cosmetic Techniques , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Craniofac Surg ; 32(1): e108-e110, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-660574

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The ongoing COVID-19 outbreak has created obstacles to health care delivery on a global scale. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), many of which already suffered from unmet surgical and medical needs, are at great risk of suffering poor health outcomes due to health care access troubles brought on by the pandemic. Craniofacial outreach programs (CFOP)-a staple for craniofacial surgeons-have historically provided essential care to LMICs. To date, there has not been literature discussing the process of resuming CFOP mission trips. Herein, we propose a roadmap to help guide future journeys, as well as summarize practical considerations.


Subject(s)
Craniofacial Abnormalities/surgery , Health Services Accessibility , Patient Safety , COVID-19 , Developing Countries , Humans , Poverty , Surgeons
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