Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 6 de 6
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(20)2021 10 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470872

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Close patient contact is an essential component of clinical dental education, which can expose students and faculty to risk of COVID-19 and its sequelae. METHODS: The study was a cross-sectional survey conducted among faculty and clinical students at an academic dental hospital in Al Madinah western Saudi Arabia. An online questionnaire was distributed to collect data on prevalence, risk factors, clinical manifestations, and long-term health and socioeconomic complications of COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Prevalence of COVID-19 was 19.6% among a total of 316 students and faculty. Participants cited family and friends as the primary source of infection (40.3%). Among cross-infection control practices, they cited failure to practice distancing as the primary reason for infection transmission (61.3%). The disease was symptomatic in 85.5% of infected personnel. Most frequently reported clinical manifestations were: fever, cough, malaise, and diarrhoea (74.1%, 56.5%, 40.3%, 32.3%, respectively). A proportion of 37.1% of infected personnel stated that they had long COVID-19, and 58.3% of infected students reported deteriorated academic achievement. CONCLUSIONS: One in five of clinical dental students and their faculty had COVID-19. Most cases were symptomatic, and a large proportion developed long COVID or adverse socioeconomic consequences. Regardless of the severity of symptoms encountered during the acute stage of COVID-19 infection, all infected dental healthcare personnel should be followed, especially those who report long COVID. Continuous follow-up and assistance for infected students may be warranted to mitigate the potential academic and mental drawbacks caused by the pandemic. Dental schools should adopt clear policies regarding COVID-19 transmission and prevention and should implement them in their infection-control education and training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Personnel, Hospital , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
3.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259632

ABSTRACT

Background Distribution of COVID-19 vaccines has been surrounded by suspicions and rumors making it necessary to provide the public with accurate reports from trustworthy experts such as healthcare professionals. Methods We distributed a questionnaire in Jordan among physicians, dentists and nurses who received a COVID-19 vaccine to explore the side effects (SE) they encountered after the first or the second dose of one of three vaccines namely: AstraZeneca Vaxzevria (AZ), Pfizer-BioNTeck (PB), and SinoPharm (SP) vaccines. Results A total of 409 professionals participated. Approximately 18% and 31% of participants reported no SE after the first dose and second dose, respectively. The remainder had mostly local side effects related to injection site (74%). Systemic side effects in the form of fatigue (52%), myalgia (44%), headache (42%), and fever (35%) prevailed mainly after the first dose. These were significantly associated with AZ vaccine, and age ≤ 45 years (p = 0.000 and 0.01, respectively). No serious SE were reported. Conclusions We can conclude that SE of COVID-19 vaccines distributed in Jordan are within the common range known so far for these vaccines. Further studies are needed to include larger sample size and longer follow-up period to monitor possible serious and long-term SE of the vaccines.

4.
J Dent Sci ; 16(3): 806-816, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-933247

ABSTRACT

Background/purpose: Several pharmacotherapeutic methods have been used for the treatment of COVID-19 with varying degrees of success. No definitive treatment or vaccine has been officially approved to-date. This review aimed to highlight COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents that are relevant to dental practice in terms of their clinical indications in COVID-19 and dental practice, as well as their adverse effects as they impact the dental patient. Material and methods: Systematic search was performed using the following keywords combinations: Pharmacotherapy AND COVID-19 OR Pharmacotherapy AND SARS-CoV-2 OR Treatment AND COVID-19. Studies were categorized according to the type of pharmacotherapy used. Pharmacotherapeutic agents were extracted and only those relevant to dental practice were included for review. Results: For analysis, a total of 79 clinical trials research articles were included that included COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents relevant to dental practice. Those were analgesics (paracetamol; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents); antibiotics (azithromycin, doxycycline, metronidazole); antivirals (penciclovir); and immunomodulatory agents (hydroxychloroquine, corticosteroids). While some COVID-19 drugs are less relevant to dental practice, as antivirals and hydroxychloroquine, their association with long-term adverse effects requires adequate knowledge among dental practitioners. Conclusion: Many of COVID-19 pharmacotherapeutic agents are used to treat oral diseases particularly orofacial pain and inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, some of these drugs may induce adverse effects that complicate dental treatment. Thorough knowledge of COVID-19 therapy and its dental implications is essential for dental practitioners, and is expected to contribute to a better understanding and effective utilization of these therapeutic agents.

5.
Eur J Dent ; 14(S 01): S20-S26, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841676

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to analyze Jordanian dentists' inquiries on oral infections and antimicrobial prescribing using dental professional WhatsApp groups during coronavirus disease lockdown period. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three professional WhatsApp groups of Jordanian dentists were reviewed and analyzed for inquiries posted during the period from January to May 2020. Inquiries were sent from patients to their dentists who posted these inquiries to the professional WhatsApp dental groups for consultation and professional advice. All queries regarding oral infections and antimicrobial prescribing were extracted and analyzed. RESULTS: Three WhatsApp professional groups with a total numbers of members of 750 dentists who posted queries about their patients were included in this study. Dentist members posted queries about their patients to these professional WhatsApp groups. There was a total of 32 inquiries regarding oral lesions and 11 consultations regarding prescribing and dental management of medically compromised patients giving a total of 43 consultations. Among which there were 19 inquiries on oral infections and 9 inquiries on antimicrobial prescribing giving a total of 28 consultations. Most common inquiries were on bacterial infections (localized dentoalveolar abscess, pericoronitis, cellulitis, and lymphoid hyperplasia of the tongue), viral herpetic infections, and Candida infections (erythematous and pseudomembranous candidiasis). CONCLUSIONS: Many dental practitioners cannot distinguish the correct diagnostic features of oral infections particularly viral and fungal infections. Continuing education should be considered to focus on clinical manifestations of various oral infections. Further, educational activities that focus on variations in treatment protocols for various infections should be introduced particularly those that concern indications for antimicrobial prescribing.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(9)2020 04 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-143965

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization, with a high fatality rate that may reach 8%. The disease is caused by SARS-CoV-2 which is one of the coronaviruses. Realizing the severity of outcomes associated with this disease and its high rate of transmission, dentists were instructed by regulatory authorities, such as the American Dental Association, to stop providing treatment to dental patients except those who have emergency complaints. This was mainly for protection of dental healthcare personnel, their families, contacts, and their patients from the transmission of virus, and also to preserve the much-needed supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE). Dentists at all times should competently follow cross-infection control protocols, but particularly during this critical time, they should do their best to decide on the emergency cases that are indicated for dental treatment. Dentists should also be updated on how this pandemic is related to their profession in order to be well oriented and prepared. This overview will address several issues concerned with the COVID-19 pandemic that directly relate to dental practice in terms of prevention, treatment, and orofacial clinical manifestations.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Dental Care/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Dental Care/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Infection Control , Practice Guidelines as Topic
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...