Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 9 de 9
Filter
1.
Frontiers in medicine ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-1871809

ABSTRACT

Objective The long-term impact of COVID-19 on patient health has been a recent focus. This study aims to determine the persistent symptoms and psychological conditions of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 15 months after onset, that patients first developed symptoms. The potential risk factors were also explored. Methods A cohort of COVID-19 patients discharged from February 20, 2020 to March 31, 2020 was recruited. Follow-ups were conducted using validated questionnaires and psychological screening scales at 15 months after onset to evaluate the patients' health status. The risk factors for long-term health impacts and their associations with disease severity was analyzed. Findings 534 COVID-19 patients were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 62.0 years old (IQR 52.0–70.0) and 295 were female (55.2%). The median time from onset to follow-up was 460.0 (451.0–467.0) days. Sleep disturbance (18.5%, 99/534) and fatigue (17.2%, 92/534) were the most common persistent symptoms. 6.4% (34/534) of the patients had depression, 9.2% (49/534) were anxious, 13.0% (70/534) had insomnia and 4.7% (25/534) suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Multivariate adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that glucocorticoid use during hospitalization (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.12–11.44) was significantly associated with an increased risk of fatigue. The OR values for anxiety and sleep disorders were 2.36 (95% CI 1.07–5.20) and 2.16 (95% CI 1.13–4.14) in females to males. The OR value of PTSD was 25.6 (95% CI 3.3–198.4) in patients with persistent symptoms to those without persistent symptoms. No significant associations were observed between fatigue syndrome or adverse mental outcomes and disease severity. Conclusions 15-month follow-up in this study demonstrated the need of extended rehabilitation intervention for complete recovery in COVID-19 patients.

2.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-318623

ABSTRACT

Background: China has been severely affected by COVID-19 (Coronavirus Disease 2019) since December 2019.In the combat against COVID-19, military health workers in China suffered from many pressures. This study aimed to investigate the current psychological status and risk factors of the military health workers.Methods Using a web-based cross-sectional survey, we collected data from 194 military health workers from three inpatient wards in two COVID-19 specialized hospitals. The survey questions consisted of demographic information, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15). Hierarchical regression analysis was used to explore potential risk factors for mental health problem.Results The overall prevalence of depressive symptoms, generalized anxiety and somatic symptoms were37.6%, 32.5% and 50%, respectively. Severe depression, generalized anxiety and somatic symptoms was 5.2%, 3.6% and 15.5%. In 22.7% of cases, comorbidities existed between depression, generalized anxiety and somatization. Junior-grade professional title was associated with depression, older age was associated with generalized anxiety and somatization, and less sleep duration and poor sleep quality were associated with all three symptoms.Conclusion The prevalence of depression, generalized anxiety and somatic symptoms were high in military health workers of COVID-19 specialized hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak. Junior-grade professional title, older age, less sleep duration, and poor sleep quality have significant effects on the mental health of military health workers. Continuous surveillance and monitoring of the psychological consequences of the COVID-19outbreak should become routine to promote the mental health of military health workers.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-315662

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is leading to widespread emotional distress such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Our objective was to investigate the gender differences in PTSD symptoms (PTSS) among COVID-19 symptomatic patients over time caused by delayed medical visit. We investigated 258 confirmed cases of COVID-19 from two designated hospitals in Wuhan from 26 February to 16 March. PTSS was measured by PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Demographics and time interval from symptom onset to the first medical visit were also collected. The results show that 48 of 258 participants (18.6 %) met the criteria of PTSD symptoms. Males had significantly higher PCL-5 scores when time interval was 7 days or more compared with less than 7 days (22.18 vs. 15.11, t=-2.280, P<0.05), whereas no such significant time effect was found in females, regardless of the severity of the disease. The present study emphasizes the significant effect of time course on PTSS only in male. It is suggested that policy makers and health services should pay more attention to PTSD in male, and call on male to seek medical treatment as soon as developing symptoms of coronavirus disease if local medical conditions permitted.

4.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-291513

ABSTRACT

Background: The long-term impact of COVID-19 on patient health has been a recent focus. This study aims to determine the persistent symptoms and psychological conditions of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 15 months after onset. The potential risk factors were also explored.Methods: A cohort of COVID-19 patients discharged from February 20, 2020 to March 31, 2020 was recruited. Follow-ups were conducted using validated questionnaires and psychological screening scales at 15 months after onset to evaluate the patients’ health status. The risk factors for long-term health impacts and their associations with disease severity was analyzed.Findings: 534 COVID-19 patients were enrolled. The median age of the patients was 62.0 years old (IQR 52.0-70.0) and 295 were female (55.2%). The median time from onset to follow-up was 460.0 (451.0-467.0) days. Sleep disturbance (18.5%, 99/534) and fatigue (17.2%, 92/534) were the most common persistent symptoms. 6.4% (34/534) of the patients had depression, 9.2% (49/534) were anxious, 13.0% (70/534) had insomnia and 4.7% (25/534) suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Multivariate adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that glucocorticoid use during hospitalization (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.12-11.44) was significantly associated with an increased risk of fatigue. The OR values for anxiety and sleep disorders were 2.36 (95% CI 1.07-5.20) and 2.16 (95% CI 1.13-4.14) in females compared with males. The OR value of PTSD was 25.6 (95% CI 3.3-198.4) in patients with persistent symptoms to those without persistent symptoms. No significant associations were observed between fatigue syndrome or adverse mental outcomes and disease severity.Interpretation: 15-month follow-up in this study aroused the need of extended rehabilitation intervention for complete recovery in COVID-19 patients. Funding: None to declare. Declaration of Interest: All the authors declare no competing interests.Ethical Approval: The Research Ethics Committee of Shanghai Changzheng Hospital approved this study (2020SL007).

5.
Nat Sci Sleep ; 13: 1519-1531, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of COVID-19 has developed into a pandemic. Data are required that specifically address the psychological consequences in COVID-19 confirmed patients. This study mainly aimed to examine posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and sleep quality among COVID-19 confirmed patients during hospitalization. METHODS: An observational study was conducted in two designated hospitals in Wuhan, China. Data were collected from 190 patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection between February 10, 2020 and March 13, 2020. RESULTS: The mean age of the 190 confirmed patients was 55.7 years (SD = 13.7), of which 96 (50.5%) were female and 88 (46.3%) had family members or acquaintances infected with COVID-19. Lymphocytopenia was presented in 62 (32.6%) patients and 25 (13.2%) patients showed oxygen desaturation. The prevalence of high PTSD symptoms was 22.6% among the 190 patients. The median time from symptom onset to first medical visit and hospitalization was 2 days (IQR, 1-5) and 16 days (IQR, 10-27), respectively. Patients' PTSD symptoms were positively related to the time from symptom onset to first medical visit (r = 0.156, p < 0.05) and hospitalization (r = 0.181, p < 0.01). There were significant correlations between sleep quality and PTSD symptoms (r = 0.312-0.547, p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The prevalence of high PTSD symptoms was 22.6% among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Early diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 symptoms are beneficial to infected patients both physically and psychologically. With the recovery of physical symptoms, psychological intervention is desired to promote the trauma recovery in COVID-19 patients.

6.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 14: 877-887, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302067

ABSTRACT

AIM: The present study examined the experiences of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 to better understand their concerns and inspiration and provide better care. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were performed with 10 COVID-19 patients from the Optical Valley Branch of Maternity and Child Healthcare Hospital of Hubei Province. Interviews were recorded on audiotape and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis. RESULTS: Four superordinate themes emerged: psychological distress caused by COVID-19 uncertainty, ethical dilemmas that will be faced after returning to the family and society, resources to cope with COVID-19, and event-related growth experience. CONCLUSION: Patients with COVID-19 were generally at high risk of having mental and social health challenges. Although the epidemic obviously affected their overall health, which led to their negative emotions or concerns, it also had a positive effect, such as viewing their relationship with families or others more positively and having more thoughts and outlooks on life. The study prompted medical staff to take their time listening to patients and pay more attention to specific psychological and social health problems in future care.

8.
Asia Pac Psychiatry ; 14(1): e12427, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887361

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: China has been severely affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) since December 2019. Military healthcare workers in China have experienced many pressures when combating COVID-19. This study aimed to investigate the current psychological status and associated risk factors among military healthcare workers. METHODS: We collected data from 194 military healthcare workers from three inpatient wards in two specialized COVID-19 hospitals using a web-based cross-sectional survey. The survey covered demographic information, the patient health questionnaire-9, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, and the patient health questionnaire-15. Hierarchical regression analysis was used to explore potential risk factors for mental health problems. RESULTS: The overall prevalence rates of depressive, generalized anxiety, and somatic symptoms were 37.6%, 32.5%, and 50%, respectively. Rates of severe depression, generalized anxiety, and somatic symptoms were 5.2%, 3.6%, and 15.5%, respectively. In 22.7% of cases, comorbidities existed between depression, generalized anxiety, and somatization. A junior-grade professional title was associated with depression, older age was associated with generalized anxiety and somatization, and short sleep duration and poor sleep quality were associated with all three symptoms. DISCUSSION: The prevalence of depression, generalized anxiety, and somatic symptoms among military healthcare workers in specialized COVID-19 hospitals is high during the current COVID-19 outbreak. A junior-grade professional title, older age, short sleep duration, and poor sleep quality significantly affect military healthcare workers' mental health. Continuous surveillance and monitoring of the psychological consequences of the COVID-19 outbreak should be routine to promote mental health among military healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel , Hospitals, Special , Humans , Mental Health , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Academic Journal of Second Military Medical University ; 41(3):303-306, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-829625

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported in late December 2019, and then erupted in China. COVID-19 is characterized by strong infectivity and a high mortality rate. The public and medical staff are under great psychological pressure. Scholars at home and abroad have carried out researches on mental health during the outbreak of COVID-19. This article summarizes the current researches on mental health related to COVID-19 from three aspects: mental health policy, mental intervention measures and mental health of key population.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL