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1.
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819931

ABSTRACT

Due to their geographical isolation and small populations, insular bats may not be able to maintain acute immunising viruses that rely on a large population for viral maintenance. Instead, endemic transmission may rely on viruses establishing persistent infections within hosts or inducing only short-lived neutralizing immunity. Therefore, studies on insular populations are valuable for developing broader understanding of viral maintenance in bats. The Christmas Island flying-fox (CIFF;Pteropus natalis) is endemic on Christmas Island, a remote Australian territory, and is an ideal model species to understand viral maintenance in small, geographically isolated bat populations. Serum or plasma (n = 190), oral swabs (n = 199), faeces (n = 31), urine (n = 32) and urine swabs (n = 25) were collected from 228 CIFFs. Samples were tested using multiplex serological and molecular assays, and attempts at virus isolation to determine the presence of paramyxoviruses, betacoronaviruses, and Australian bat lyssavirus. Analysis of serological data provide evidence that the species is maintaining a pararubulavirus and a betacoronavirus. There was little serological evidence supporting the presence of active circulation of the other viruses assessed in the present study. No viral nucleic acid was detected and no viruses were isolated. Age-seropositivity results support the hypothesis that geographically isolated bat populations can maintain some paramyxoviruses and coronaviruses. Further studies are required to elucidate infection dynamics and characterise viruses in the CIFF. Lastly, apparent absence of some pathogens could have implications for the conservation of the CIFF if a novel disease were introduced into the population through human carriage or an invasive species. Adopting increased biosecurity protocols for ships porting on Christmas Island and for researchers and bat carers working with flying-foxes are recommended to decrease the risk of pathogen introduction and contribute to the health and conservation of the species. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

3.
Front Pharmacol ; 13: 813087, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775746

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by infection with the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an acute respiratory disease with systemic complications. Therapeutic strategies for COVID-19, including repurposing (partially) developed drugs are urgently needed, regardless of the increasingly successful vaccination outcomes. We characterized two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional models (3D) to establish a physiologically relevant airway epithelial model with potential for investigating SARS-CoV-2 therapeutics. Human airway basal epithelial cells maintained in submerged 2D culture were used at low passage to retain the capacity to differentiate into ciliated, club, and goblet cells in both air-liquid interface culture (ALI) and airway organoid cultures, which were then analyzed for cell phenotype makers. Airway biopsies from non-asthmatic and asthmatic donors enabled comparative evaluation of the level and distribution of immunoreactive angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). ACE2 and transmembrane serine proteinase 2 (TMPRSS2) mRNA were expressed in ALI and airway organoids at levels similar to those of native (i.e., non-cultured) human bronchial epithelial cells, whereas furin expression was more faithfully represented in ALI. ACE2 was mainly localized to ciliated and basal epithelial cells in human airway biopsies, ALI, and airway organoids. Cystic fibrosis appeared to have no influence on ACE2 gene expression. Neither asthma nor smoking status had consistent marked influence on the expression or distribution of ACE2 in airway biopsies. SARS-CoV-2 infection of ALI cultures did not increase the levels of selected cytokines. Organotypic, and particularly ALI airway cultures are useful and practical tools for investigation of SARS-CoV-2 infection and evaluating the clinical potential of therapeutics for COVID-19.

4.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(2): 160-164, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385266

ABSTRACT

The emergence of alternate variants of SARS-CoV-2 due to ongoing adaptations in humans and following human-to-animal transmission has raised concern over the efficacy of vaccines against new variants. We describe human-to-animal transmission (zooanthroponosis) of SARS-CoV-2 and its implications for faunal virus persistence and vaccine-mediated immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Zoonoses/transmission , Zoonoses/virology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/transmission , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Humans , Immunity , Viral Vaccines/immunology
5.
One Health ; 13: 100247, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220997

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, infected over 100 million people globally by February 2021. Reverse zoonotic transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from humans to other species has been documented in pet cats and dogs, big cats and gorillas in zoos, and farmed mink. As SARS-CoV-2 is closely related to known bat viruses, assessment of the potential risk of transmission of the virus from humans to bats, and its subsequent impacts on conservation and public health, is warranted. A qualitative risk assessment was conducted by a multi-disciplinary group to assess this risk in bats in the Australian context, with the aim of informing risk management strategies for human activities involving interactions with bats. The overall risk of SARS-CoV-2 establishing in an Australian bat population was assessed to be Low, however with a High level of uncertainty. The outcome of the assessment indicates that, for the Australian situation where the prevalence of COVID-19 in humans is very low, it is reasonable for research and rehabilitation of bats to continue, provided additional biosecurity measures are applied. Risk assessment is challenging for an emerging disease where information is lacking and the situation is changing rapidly; assessments should be revised if human prevalence or other important factors change significantly. The framework developed here, based on established animal disease risk assessment approaches adapted to assess reverse zoonotic transmission, has potential application to a range of wildlife species and situations.

6.
Prof Case Manag ; 26(2): 62-69, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087857

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Since the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the disease known as COVID-19, case management has emerged as a critical intervention in the treatment of cases, particularly for patients with severe symptoms and medical complications. In addition, case managers have been on the front lines of the response across the health care spectrum to reduce risks of contagion, including among health care workers. The purpose of this article is to discuss the case management response, highlighting the importance of individual care plans to provide access to the right care and treatment at the right time to address both the consequences of the disease and patient comorbidities. PRIMARY PRACTICE SETTINGS: The COVID-19 response spans the full continuum of health and human services, including acute care, subacute care, workers' compensation (especially catastrophic case management), home health, primary care, and community-based care. IMPLICATIONS FOR CASE MANAGEMENT PRACTICE: From the earliest days of the pandemic, case managers have assumed an important role on the front lines of the medical response to COVID-19, ensuring that procedures are in place for managing a range of patients: those who were symptomatic but able to self-isolate and care for themselves at home; those who had serious symptoms and needed to be hospitalized; and those who were asymptomatic and needed to be educated about the importance of self-isolating. Across the care spectrum, individualized responses to the clinical and psychosocial needs of patients with COVID-19 in acute care, subacute care, home health, and other outpatient settings have been guided by the well-established case management process of screening, assessing, planning, implementing, following up, transitioning, and evaluating. In addition, professional case managers are guided by values such as advocacy, ensuring access to the right care and treatment at the right time; autonomy, respecting the right to self-determination; and justice, promoting fairness and equity in access to resources and treatment. The value of justice also addresses the sobering reality that people from racial and ethnic minority groups are at an increased risk of getting sick and dying from COVID-19. Going forward, case management will continue to play a major role in supporting patients with COVID-19, in both inpatient and outpatient settings, with telephonic follow-up and greater use of telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Case Management/standards , Critical Care Nursing/education , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Patient Care Planning/standards , Patient-Centered Care/standards , Adult , Case Management/statistics & numerical data , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Care Planning/statistics & numerical data , Patient-Centered Care/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Cell Host Microbe ; 29(2): 160-164, 2021 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064929

ABSTRACT

The emergence of alternate variants of SARS-CoV-2 due to ongoing adaptations in humans and following human-to-animal transmission has raised concern over the efficacy of vaccines against new variants. We describe human-to-animal transmission (zooanthroponosis) of SARS-CoV-2 and its implications for faunal virus persistence and vaccine-mediated immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/veterinary , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Zoonoses/transmission , Zoonoses/virology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/transmission , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/virology , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Humans , Immunity , Viral Vaccines/immunology
9.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 69(2): 297-307, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1007329

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an emerging virus that has caused significant human morbidity and mortality since its detection in late 2019. With the rapid emergence has come an unprecedented programme of vaccine development with at least 300 candidates under development. Ferrets have proven to be an appropriate animal model for testing safety and efficacy of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines due to quantifiable virus shedding in nasal washes and oral swabs. Here, we outline our efforts early in the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak to propagate and characterize an Australian isolate of the virus in vitro and in an ex vivo model of human airway epithelium, as well as to demonstrate the susceptibility of domestic ferrets (Mustela putorius furo) to SARS-CoV-2 infection following intranasal challenge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ferrets , Animals , Australia , COVID-19/veterinary , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Transbound Emerg Dis ; 68(4): 2628-2632, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901200

ABSTRACT

Many infectious pathogens can be transmitted by highly mobile species, like bats that can act as reservoir hosts for viruses such as henipaviruses, lyssaviruses and coronaviruses. In this study, we investigated the seroepidemiology of protein antigens to Severe acute respiratory syndrome virus (SARS-CoV-1) and Middle eastern respiratory syndrome virus (MERS-CoV) in Grey-headed flying foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) in Adelaide, Australia sampled between September 2015 and February 2018. A total of 301 serum samples were collected and evaluated using a multiplex Luminex binding assay, and median fluorescence intensity thresholds were determined using finite-mixture modelling. We found evidence of antibodies reactive to SARS-CoV-1 or a related antigen with 42.5% (CI: 34.3%-51.2%) seroprevalence but insufficient evidence of reactivity to MERS-CoV antigen. This study provides evidence that the Grey-headed flying foxes sampled in Adelaide have been exposed to a SARS-like coronavirus.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera , Coronavirus Infections , SARS Virus , Animals , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Lyssavirus , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus , Seroepidemiologic Studies
11.
Front Immunol ; 11: 26, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-822478

ABSTRACT

In recent years, viruses similar to those that cause serious disease in humans and other mammals have been detected in apparently healthy bats. These include filoviruses, paramyxoviruses, and coronaviruses that cause severe diseases such as Ebola virus disease, Marburg haemorrhagic fever and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in humans. The evolution of flight in bats seem to have selected for a unique set of antiviral immune responses that control virus propagation, while limiting self-damaging inflammatory responses. Here, we summarize our current understanding of antiviral immune responses in bats and discuss their ability to co-exist with emerging viruses that cause serious disease in other mammals. We highlight how this knowledge may help us to predict viral spillovers into new hosts and discuss future directions for the field.


Subject(s)
Chiroptera/immunology , Chiroptera/virology , DNA Viruses/immunology , Host Adaptation/immunology , Immune System/virology , RNA Viruses/immunology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Evolution, Molecular , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/metabolism , Viral Zoonoses/immunology , Viral Zoonoses/transmission
13.
Viruses ; 12(6)2020 06 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-620517

ABSTRACT

The respiratory Influenza A Viruses (IAVs) and emerging zoonotic viruses such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pose a significant threat to human health. To accelerate our understanding of the host-pathogen response to respiratory viruses, the use of more complex in vitro systems such as normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cell culture models has gained prominence as an alternative to animal models. NHBE cells were differentiated under air-liquid interface (ALI) conditions to form an in vitro pseudostratified epithelium. The responses of well-differentiated (wd) NHBE cells were examined following infection with the 2009 pandemic Influenza A/H1N1pdm09 strain or following challenge with the dsRNA mimic, poly(I:C). At 30 h postinfection with H1N1pdm09, the integrity of the airway epithelium was severely impaired and apical junction complex damage was exhibited by the disassembly of zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the cell cytoskeleton. wdNHBE cells produced an innate immune response to IAV-infection with increased transcription of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and the antiviral viperin but reduced expression of the mucin-encoding MUC5B, which may impair mucociliary clearance. Poly(I:C) produced similar responses to IAV, with the exception of MUC5B expression which was more than 3-fold higher than for control cells. This study demonstrates that wdNHBE cells are an appropriate ex-vivo model system to investigate the pathogenesis of respiratory viruses.


Subject(s)
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/physiology , Influenza, Human/virology , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Respiratory Mucosa/virology , Animals , Bronchi/cytology , Bronchi/virology , Cells, Cultured , Chemokines/metabolism , Cytokines/metabolism , Dogs , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype/immunology , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Intercellular Junctions , Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells , Models, Biological , Mucin 5AC/metabolism , Pandemics , Virus Cultivation
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