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1.
Recent Adv Antiinfect Drug Discov ; 2022 Sep 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2022311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID- 19 vaccines have been released, giving a major hope of getting rid of the dark pandemic crisis. Availability of vaccine does not necessarily mean that the mass vaccination program is a success. We aimed to investigate COVID-19 vaccination knowledge level, acceptance rate, and perception state among Egyptians. METHODS: An analytical cross-sectional online survey was carried out utilizing a self-administered adult questionnaire which assesses vaccination acceptance with related socio-demographic factors and perceptions based on health belief model perspectives. Predictors of vaccination acceptance were based on logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: We analyzed data for 957 participants, aged 18-78 years, 55.7% were females, and 66.9% were healthcare workers (HCWs). About one-fourth had history of confirmed COVID-19 infection and 56.5% would accept to have one of COVID-19 vaccines where "Pfizer" was the most preferable one (37.8%), while "AstraZeneca" was the most rejected vaccine (26.8%). The 1st vaccine dose was received by 273 (28.5%) of which 260 were intended to receive the 2nd dose. Vaccine efficacy, side effects, protection time, and administration route were essentially among factors that may influence their decision to accept COVID-19 vaccines. About 83.1% had good knowledge about vaccination which was significantly higher with increased age, among graduates/professionals, governmental workers, HCWs in addition to those able to save/invest money, had history of confirmed COVID-19 infection, and intending to have COVID-19 vaccine.. Perceptions that vaccination decreases chance of getting COVID-19 or its complications (OR=9.28; CI: 5.03-17.12), vaccination makes less worry about catching COVID-19 (OR=6.76; CI: 3.88-11.76), and being afraid of getting COVID-19 (OR=2.04; CI: 1.26-3.31) were strong significant predictors for vaccine acceptance. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine campaigns should emphasize vaccine benefits and highlight severity of infection, while addressing barriers to vaccination in order to improve vaccine coverage among populations.

2.
J Egypt Public Health Assoc ; 96(1): 29, 2021 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502025

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge about the outcome of COVID-19 on pregnant women is so important. The published literature on the outcomes of pregnant women with COVID-19 is confusing. The aim of this study was to report our clinical experience about the effect of COVID-19 on pregnant women and to determine whether it was associated with increased mortality or an increase in the need for mechanical ventilation in this special category of patients. METHODS: This was a cohort study from some isolation hospitals of the Ministry of Health and Population, in eleven governorates, Egypt. The clinical data from the first 64 pregnant women with COVID-19 whose care was managed at some of the Egyptian hospitals from 14 March to 14 June 2020 as well as 114 non-pregnant women with COVID-19 was reviewed. RESULTS: The two groups did not show any significant difference regarding the main outcomes of the disease. Two cases in each group needed mechanical ventilation (p 0.617). Three cases (4.7%) died among the pregnant women and two (1.8%) died among the non-pregnant women (p 0.352). CONCLUSIONS: The main clinical outcomes of COVID-19 were not different between pregnant and non-pregnant women with COVID-19. Based on our findings, pregnancy did not exacerbate the course or mortality of COVID-19 pneumonia.

3.
Curr Med Imaging ; 17(12): 1473-1480, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221872

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: In the midst of this pandemic, planning the prioritization of hospital admissions for patients affected with COVID-19 should be of prime concern, particularly in healthcare settings with limited resources. Thus, in this study, we aimed to develop a novel approach to triage COVID-19 patients and attempt to prioritize their hospital admission using Lung Ultrasonography (LUS). The efficacy of LUS in triaging suspected COVID-19 patients and assessing the severity of COVID-19 pneumonia was evaluated; the findings were then compared with those obtained by chest computed tomography (CT). METHODS: This multicenter, cross-sectional study comprised 243 COVID-19 patients who presented to the emergency department in 3 major university hospitals in Egypt. LUS was performed by an experienced emergency or chest physician, according to the local protocol of each hospital. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were then collected from each patient. Each patient was subjected to chest CT scans and LUS. RESULTS: The mean age of the 243 patients was 46.7 ± 10.4 years. Ground-glass opacity, subpleural consolidation, translobar consolidation, and crazy paving were reported in the chest CT scans of 54.3%, 15.2%, 11.1%, and 8.6% of the patients, respectively. B-line artifacts were observed in 81.1% of the patients (confluent pattern, 18.9%). The LUS findings completely coincided with the CT findings (Kappa agreement value, 0.77) in 197 patients (81.1%) and offered a diagnostic sensitivity of 74%, diagnostic specificity of 97.9%, positive predictive value of 90.2%, and negative predictive value of 93.6% for the COVID-19 patients. Following the addition of O2 saturation to the lung imaging findings, the ultrasound method was able to demonstrate 100% sensitivity and specificity in accurately differentiating between severe and non-severe lung diseases. CONCLUSION: LUS with oxygen saturation might prove to be effective in prioritizing the hospital admission of COVID-19 patients, particularly in healthcare settings with limited resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Hospitalization , Ultrasonography , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Developing Countries , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged
4.
Egypt Liver J ; 11(1): 21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158234

ABSTRACT

Chronic liver diseases are common worldwide, especially in developing countries. The rapid spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)/(COVID-19) leads to the infection of many patients with underlying chronic liver diseases. As a relatively new disease, management of COVID-19, in the context of chronic liver disease, is mainly based on the experience of the treating physician and the available data. In this review, we summarize the available evidence about the management of liver disease patients, in the context of COVID-19 infection, which can increase the severity of viral hepatitis B. Also, its clearance in HBV patients is delayed. A sixfold increased severity of COVID-19 was reported in obese patients with metabolic associated fatty liver disease (MAFDL). In patients with autoimmune liver disease (AILD), it is not recommended to change their immunosuppressive therapy (as long as they are not infected with COVID-19), in order to avoid a flare of liver disease. However, immunosuppressant drugs should be modified, in the case of infection with COVID-19. To date, no data suggest an increased risk or severity in metabolic liver diseases, such as hemochromatosis, Wilson's disease, or alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Patients with liver cirrhosis should be carefully managed with minimum exposure to healthcare facilities. Basic investigations for follow-up can be scheduled at wider intervals; if patients need admission, this should be in COVID-19-clean areas. Patients with hepatocellular carcinomas may have a poor prognosis according to preliminary reports from China. The course of COVID-19 in liver transplant recipients on immunosuppression seems to have a benign course, based on few reports in children and adults. The hepatotoxicity of COVID-19 drugs ranges from mild liver enzyme elevation to a flare of underlying liver diseases. Therefore, the decision should be customized. Telemedicine can minimize the exposure of healthcare workers and patients to infection with COVID-19 and decrease the consumption of personal protective equipment.

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