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1.
Curr Probl Cardiol ; : 101236, 2022 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814290

ABSTRACT

Pulmonary hypertension is one of the difficult situations to treat. Complex pathophysiology, association of the multiple comorbidities make clinical scenario challenging. Recently it is being shown that patients who had recovered from coronavirus disease infection, are at risk of developing pulmonary hypertension. Studies on animals have been going on to find out newer treatment options. There are recent advancements in the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. Role of anticoagulation, recombinant fusion proteins, stem cell therapy are emerging as therapeutic options for affected patients. SGLT2 inhibitors have potential to have beneficial effects on pulmonary hypertension. Apart from the medical managements, advanced interventions are also getting popular. In this review article, the authors have discussed pathophysiology, recent advancement of treatments including coronavirus disease patients, and future aspect of managing pulmonary hypertension. We have highlighted treatment options for patients with sleep apnea, interstitial lung disease to discuss the challenges and possible options to manage those patients.

2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 107, 2022 Jan 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) continues to pose a significant threat to public health worldwide. The purpose of this study was to review current evidence obtained from randomized clinical trials on the efficacy of antivirals for COVID-19 treatment. METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed to identify randomized controlled trials published up to September 4, 2021 that examined the efficacy of antivirals for COVID-19 treatment. Studies that were not randomized controlled trials or that did not include treatment of COVID-19 with approved antivirals were excluded. Risk of bias was assessed using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) method. Due to study heterogeneity, inferential statistics were not performed and data were expressed as descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of the 2,284 articles retrieved, 31 (12,440 patients) articles were included. Overall, antivirals were more effective when administered early in the disease course. No antiviral treatment demonstrated efficacy at reducing COVID-19 mortality. Sofosbuvir/daclatasvir results suggested clinical improvement, although statistical power was low. Remdesivir exhibited efficacy in reducing time to recovery, but results were inconsistent across trials. CONCLUSIONS: Although select antivirals have exhibited efficacy to improve clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients, none demonstrated efficacy in reducing mortality. Larger RCTs are needed to conclusively establish efficacy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Humans , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(20): e25719, 2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corticosteroid treatment is an effective and common therapeutic strategy for various inflammatory lung pathologies and may be an effective treatment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis of current literature was to investigate the clinical outcomes associated with corticosteroid treatment of COVID-19. METHODS: We systematically searched PubMed, medRxiv, Web of Science, and Scopus databases through March 10, 2021 to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effects of corticosteroid therapies for COVID-19 treatment. Outcomes of interest were mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, serious adverse events (SAEs), and superinfection. RESULTS: A total of 7737 patients from 8 RCTs were included in the quantitative meta-analysis, of which 2795 (36.1%) patients received corticosteroids plus standard of care (SOC) while 4942 (63.9%) patients received placebo and/or SOC alone. The odds of mortality were significantly lower in patients that received corticosteroids as compared to SOC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.85 [95% CI: 0.76; 0.95], P = .003). Corticosteroid treatment reduced the odds of a need for mechanical ventilation as compared to SOC (OR = 0.76 [95% CI: 0.59; 0.97], P = .030). There was no significant difference between the corticosteroid and SOC groups with regards to SAEs and superinfections. CONCLUSION: Corticosteroid treatment can reduce the odds for mortality and the need for mechanical ventilation in severe COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/mortality , Humans , Odds Ratio , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
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