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2.
Minerva Surg ; 77(2): 171-179, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1789849

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The recent COrona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused a massive disruption of surgical activity and after a year from its first outbreak surgeons still struggle to keep their regular activity coexisting with the virus exhausting requests of healthcare resources. The aim of this paper is to offer a comprehensive overview of the most important recommendations by the International Guidelines about general surgery, and possibly to invite building common shared guidelines to preserve the potential to provide surgical assistance despite the pandemic. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis statement. PubMed, Embase, Cochrane and Web of Science databases were searched. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: The searches revealed a total of 18579 articles published up to the end of February 2021. Five articles published between March and May 2020, were included in the present study: Guidelines from The European Society of Trauma and Emergency Surgery (ESTES), The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) and The European Association for Endoscopic Surgeons (EAES), The Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgeons of Asia (ELSA), The European Hernia Society (EHS) and The International Organization for the Study of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IOS-IBD). CONCLUSIONS: In the likely scenario that the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic will become an endemic chronic problem, we should not be forced to choose between COVID-19 or surgery in the future and find a way to make both coexisting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Laparoscopy , Surgeons , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Updates Surg ; 74(3): 1017-1025, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1756923

ABSTRACT

During the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, most of the surgical procedures were performed for emergencies or oncologic reasons to the detriment of the remaining elective procedures for benign conditions. Ileostomy or colostomy creation are sequelae of oncologic or emergency colorectal surgery, but their closure does not fall within the definition of oncologic or emergency surgery. The aim of this retrospective multicentre observational study is to report the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the ostomy closure rate in Italy. Data regarding ileostomy and colostomy creation and closure from 24 Italian centres, during the study period (March 2020-February 2021) and during the control period (March 2019-February 2020) were collected. Three hospitals (12.5%) were COVID free. The number of colostomies and ileostomies created and closed in the same period was lower ( -18.8% and -30%, respectively) in the study period in comparison to the control period (p = 0.1915 and p = 0.0001, respectively), such as the ostomies closed in the analysed periods but created before (colostomy -36.2% and ileostomy -7.4%, p = 0.2211 and p = 0.1319, respectively). Overall, a 19.5% reduction in ostomies closed occurred in the study period. Based on the present study, a reduction in ostomy closure rate occurred in Italy between March 2020 and February 2021. During the pandemic, the need to change the clinical practice probably prolonged deterioration of quality of life in patients with ostomies, increasing number of stomas that will never be closed, and related management costs, even if these issues have not been investigated in this study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ostomy , Colostomy/methods , Humans , Ostomy/methods , Pandemics , Quality of Life
4.
Minerva Surg ; 77(1): 50-56, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485663

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The aim of this systematic review was to report and to analyze if there is and what is the impact of telemedicine in the surgical practice during COVID-19 pandemic. Many authors have posited that the pandemic urged a high implementation of the telemedicine service even in surgical specialties, however, the impact of this change of the clinical practice has been variably reported and its utilization in general surgery is uncertain. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: All articles from any country written in English, Italian, Spanish, or French, about the use of telemedicine for indication to surgical treatment or for 30-day postoperative follow-up in general surgery during the COVID 19 outbreak, from the March 1, 2020, to December 1, 2020, were included. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Two hundred nine articles were fully analyzed, and 207 further articles were excluded. Finally, 2 articles, both published in October 2020, were included in the present systematic review. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, the rapid spread of SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has forced to review the traditional methods to deliver surgical assistance and urged surgeons to find alternative methods to continue their practice. The literature about this topic is yet scarce and many questions regarding its efficacy in improving patients' health, cost-effectiveness and user satisfaction remain unsolved.


Subject(s)
Aftercare , COVID-19 , General Surgery , Telemedicine , Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , Postoperative Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
5.
Minerva Chir ; 75(5): 298-304, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456626

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Morgagni hernias present technical challenges. The laparoscopic approach for repair was first described in 1992; however, as these hernias are uncommon in adult life, few data exist on the optimal method for surgical management. The purpose of this study was to analyze a method for laparoscopic repair of Morgagni giant hernias using laparoscopic primary closure with V lock (Medtronic, Covidien). METHODS: This case series describes a method of laparoscopic Morgagni hernia repair using primary closure. In all patients, a laparoscopic transabdominal approach was used. The content of the hernia was reduced into the abdomen, and the diaphragmatic defect was closed with a running laparoscopic suture using a self-fixating suture. Clips were placed at the edges of the suture to secure the pledged sutures to both the anterior and posterior fascia. Demographic data such as BMI and operative and postoperative data were collected. RESULTS: Retrospectively collected data for 9 patients were analyzed. There were 1 (11.1%) males and 8 (88.8%) females. The median BMI was 29.14±52 kg/m2. The median operative time was 80±25 minutes. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to open surgery. Patients began a fluid diet on the first postoperative day and were discharged after a median hospital stay of 3±1.87 days. In a median follow-up of 36 months, we did not observe any recurrences. CONCLUSIONS: Transabdominal laparoscopic approach with primary closure of the diaphragmatic defect is a viable approach for the repair of Morgagni hernia. In our experience, the use of laparoscopic transabdominal suture fixed to the fascia allowed the closure of the defect laparoscopically with minimal tension on the repairs.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Wound Closure Techniques , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/surgery , Herniorrhaphy/methods , Laparoscopy , Suture Techniques , Aged , Body Mass Index , Fasciotomy , Female , Hernias, Diaphragmatic, Congenital/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Medical Illustration , Operative Time , Retrospective Studies
6.
Minerva Surg ; 76(3): 281-285, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257463

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the surgical scenario, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) diffusion worldwide entails on the one hand the need to continue to perform surgery at least in case of emergency or oncologic surgery, in patients with or without COronaVIrus Disease 2019 (COVID-19); and on the other hand, to avoid the pandemic diffusion both between patients and medical and nursing team. The aim of this study was to report our surgical management protocol during the COVID-19 pandemic in an Italian non-referral center. METHODS: Data retrieved during the outbreak for the COVID-19 pandemic, from March 8 to May 4, 2020 (study period) were analyzed and compared to data obtained during the same period in 2019 (control period). RESULTS: During the study period, 41 surgical procedures (24 electives, 17 emergency surgical procedures) underwent surgery in comparison to 99 procedures in the control period. Stratifying the procedures in elective and emergency surgery, and based on the indication for surgery, the only statistically significant difference was observed in the elective surgery regarding the abdominal wall surgery (0 vs. 13 procedures, P=0.0339). Statistically significant differences were not observed regarding the colorectal and the breast oncologic surgery. All stuff members were COVID-19 free. CONCLUSIONS: The present protocol proved to be safe and useful to prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection before and after surgery for both patients and stuff. The pandemic was responsible for the reduction in number of procedures performed, anyway for the oncologic surgery a statistically significant volume reduction in comparison to 2019 was not observed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data , Abdominal Wall/surgery , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Neoplasms/surgery , Operating Rooms , Retrospective Studies
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