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1.
J Laryngol Otol ; : 1-5, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106258

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the incidence of radiological inflammation within the paranasal sinuses, middle ear and mastoid in patients with confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted to examine consecutive adults (aged over 18 years) with coronavirus disease 2019 (confirmed on polymerase chain reaction within 7 days of imaging) who underwent computed tomography of the head between 1 March 2020 and 24 June 2020. Lund-Mackay and mastoid and middle-ear opacification scores were used to categorise the extent of sinus and mastoid opacification on axial and coronal computed tomography images. RESULTS: Of 147 patients originally identified, only 83 met the inclusion criteria. Sinus opacification was present in 51.8 per cent of patients (n = 43), and middle-ear or mastoid opacification was observed in 24.1 per cent (n = 20). There was no statistically significant difference in sinus or middle-ear and mastoid opacification between patients after stratification based on 30-day all-cause mortality. CONCLUSION: Radiological computed tomography findings suggest mild mucosal disease within the sinuses, middle ear and mastoid. There was no statistical correlation between such opacification and 30-day mortality.

2.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; JOUR:676-682, 25(4).
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2090539

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have suffered during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, with worsening of both motor and nonmotor symptoms. We conducted this study to evaluate the quality of life (QoL) and concerns of PD patients and their caregivers. Method(s): The study was conducted in mixed method, where the baseline data was taken by face-to-face interview during the unlock phase of December 2020 to March 2021, when there was no lockdown. This included demography, Hoehn and Yahr (HY) stage, Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-8 (PDQ-8), and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire for Carer (PDQ-Carer). During the second wave of COVID-19 (April-June 2021), telephonic interview was conducted using Depression, Anxiety Stress Scale- 21 Items (DASS-21), PDQ-8, PDQ-Carer, and open-ended questions regarding their concerns. Result(s): Compared with the baseline data, PDQ-8 and PDQ-Carer scores showed significant worsening during the second wave. DASS-21 scores had significant correlation with PDQ-Carer and PDQ-8 scores. Female patients reported poorer QoL. Caregivers of non-vaccinated patients had worse PDQ-Carer Strain scores. There was no significant association between worsening of motor symptoms and PDQ-8 and PDQ-Carer scores. More than 80% patients and 70% caregivers reported anxiety and depression. Their concerns were regarding difficulties due to social isolation, restriction of activity, and financial constraints. Additionally, there were worries about patient care, vaccination, and recurrence of the wave. Conclusion(s): The QoL of both patients and their caregivers were affected by the pandemic. A significant proportion had anxiety and depression, and this correlated with QoL. There were some important concerns on various aspects of the pandemic. Copyright © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

3.
Colorectal Disease ; 24(Supplement 3):221-222, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2078403

ABSTRACT

Aim: NHS England, in June 2020, published guidance that required Faecal Immunochemical Testing (FIT) for all symptomatic patients, including high and low-risk patients, prior to the referral to the suspected colorectal cancer pathway. FIT was utilised as a stratification tool to ration limited diagnostic services during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigates the feasibility of the recommended guidelines in a Northeast London catchment population. Method(s): Patients considered for referral on the two-week wait (2WW) pathway for suspected colorectal cancer provided stool samples for FIT analysis. Samples were analysed at a single centre using an OC-Sensor FIT-Screening System, with FIT >10 mug Hb/g warranting urgent investigation. Results were then retrospectively correlated with patient records. Result(s): From January 2021 to June 2021, there was a 111.4% increase in FIT requests compared to the previous 12 months. However, of the 8475 samples, 19% (1607) were unprocessed by the lab. There were 20% (1718) FIT positive above the NICE threshold of 10 mug Hb/g, while 61% (5150) were negative. 27% underwent referral and urgent investigation. 314 patients were also identified as FIT positive, though not referred. Conclusion(s): This study highlights concerns about FIT's real-world feasibility and acceptance as a risk stratification tool prior to referral. Despite recommendations implemented in mid-2020, significant proportions of patients referred lacked a FIT result prior to referral. Furthermore, literature suggests FIT is widely accepted;however, this is not congruent with the study results demonstrating a substantial proportion of 19% of unprocessed samples due to incorrectly labelled and inadequate samples received by the lab. This, therefore, raises concerns about relying on FIT and the potential delays in the diagnosis of CRC due to repeating unprocessed samples. Finally, we are investigating the outcome for the 314 patients with FIT results above the 10 mug Hb/g threshold that were not referred.

4.
Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health ; 51(3):436-443, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2055630

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Western experience shows that with subsequent waves of corona virus disease-2019 (Covid-19), children were affected more and required hospitalization. Universal Covid-19 vaccination among children is difficult to advocate given the low severity of Covid-19 in this age group. Objectives: This study assesses vaccine hesitancy (VH) among an urban-majority survey-population in Ahmedabad, Gujarat and the factors bearing on it. Method: A 26-point questionnaire was circulated among parents with children up to 18 years of age online as well as offline, assessing age, education, urban vs. rural dwelling, previous Covid-19 and Covid-19 vaccination status and the existing information regarding Covid-19 in children in previous and impending waves. Intention of the respondents to vaccinate their children immediately, wait-and-watch or not vaccinate at all and reasons leading to it were explored. The primary outcome was VH (wait-and-watch or not-opting-tovaccinate). Intention to vaccinate immediately was taken as reference. We used multinomial logistic regression to assess the association of outcome with age, gender, education, previous Covid-19 and vaccination status. Analysis was done using STATA-16 software.Results: Of 1102 respondents, VH was reported by 37.6%. Respondents who were older, females, unvaccinated, believed Covid-19 would not be more severe among children and those having safety concerns with vaccines were more likely to report VH. Vaccine related information obtained from healthcare workers was associated with the least VH. Rapid development and approval of vaccines did not affect VH. Conclusions: Age, gender, Covid-19 vaccination status of parents and perception of severity of Covid-19 among children were major determinants of VH in our study. Source of vaccine-related (mis)information concerns related to short and long-term safety of vaccines was significantly associated with VH © Open Access Article published under the Creative Commons Attribution CC-BY License

5.
Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. CADTH Health Technology Review ; 06:06, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2044967

ABSTRACT

According to the International Labour Organization, workplace violence (WPV) is defined as "Any action, incident or behaviour that departs from reasonable conduct in which a person is assaulted, threatened, harmed, injured in the course of, or as a direct result of, his or her work."1 Prevalence of WPV in the health care setting is increasing and has detrimental consequences for the health care worker (HCW), the patient and the organization.2 Workplace violence in the ED perpetrated by patients and visitors is a serious problem. EDs are considered high-risk areas with incidences of violence against HCWs reported to range between 60% and 90%.3 Although WPV frequently occurs in the ED, few affected individuals report it, and fewer seek help.4 , 5 Causes of violence and aggression can vary and are not always clear. Common causes of aggression and violence include distress and frustration, physiologic imbalances, substance misuse and abuse, intoxication, and mental health issues.6 WPV may result in physical injuries and mental stress to the HCW, which could lead to staff absenteeism, staff turnover, decreased productivity, and compromised care.2 Additionally, ED violence has financial implications for the health care system. In Ontario, ED violence is associated with costs of $23.8 million annually.4 For the prevention of violence experienced by HCWs in the ED, various interventions have been implemented;these include education and training programs, various pharmacological interventions, and physical restraint procedures. Violence toward HCWs in the ED is a longstanding problem that has reportedly worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic.7 The evidence regarding interventions for prevention of violence toward HCWs in the ED is needed to make informed decisions regarding implementation of preventive measures. The purpose of this report is to review the evidence regarding the clinical effectiveness of interventions to address and prevent violence and harassment toward HCWs in the ED, and additionally, to review the evidence-based guidelines regarding interventions to address and prevent violence and harassment toward HCWs in the ED.

6.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S798-S799, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2041537

ABSTRACT

Background: Dostarlimab is a programmed death 1 (PD-1) inhibitor approved in the EU as a monotherapy in patients (pts) with dMMR/MSI-H AR EC that has progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy;and in the US as a monotherapy in pts with dMMR AR EC that has progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy or dMMR solid tumors that have progressed on or after prior treatment, with no satisfactory alternative treatment options. We report on PFS and OS in 2 expansion cohorts of the GARNET trial that enrolled pts with EC. Methods: GARNET is a multicenter, open-label, single-arm phase 1 study. Pts were assigned to cohort A1 (dMMR/MSI-H EC) or A2 (MMRp/MSS EC) based on local immunohistochemistry assessment. Pts received 500 mg of dostarlimab IV every 3 weeks for 4 cycles, then 1000 mg every 6 weeks until disease progression, discontinuation, or withdrawal. PFS and OS are secondary efficacy endpoints. Results: 153 pts with dMMR/MSI-H and 161 pts with MMRp/MSS EC were enrolled and treated. The efficacy-evaluable population included 143 pts with dMMR/MSI-H EC and 156 pts with MMRp/MSS EC with measurable disease at baseline and ≥6 mo of follow-up. Median follow-up was 27.6 mo for dMMR/MSI-H and 33.0 mo for MMRp/MSS EC (Table). For pts with dMMR/MSI-H EC, median PFS (mPFS) was 6.0 mo, with 3-year estimated PFS rate of 40.1%. With 37.3% of pts experiencing an event, mOS was not reached;estimated 3-year OS was >50%. For pts with MMRp/MSS EC, mPFS was 2.7 mo. mOS was 16.9 mo with 68.9% of pts experiencing an event. Safety has been previously reported. [Formula presented] Conclusions: Dostarlimab demonstrated durable antitumor activity in dMMR/MSI-H and MMRp/MSS AR EC. dMMR/MSI-H was associated with longer PFS and OS than MMRp/MSS as expected. Clinical trial identification: NCT02715284. Editorial acknowledgement: Writing and editorial support, funded by GlaxoSmithKline (Waltham, MA, USA) and coordinated by Heather Ostendorff-Bach, PhD, of GlaxoSmithKline, was provided by Shannon Morgan-Pelosi, PhD, and Jennifer Robertson, PhD, of Ashfield MedComms, an Ashfield Health company (Middletown, CT, USA). Legal entity responsible for the study: GlaxoSmithKline. Funding: GlaxoSmithKline. Disclosure: A.V. Tinker: Financial Interests, Institutional, Sponsor/Funding: AstraZeneca;Financial Interests, Personal, Other: AstraZeneca, Eisai, GlaxoSmithKline. B. Pothuri: Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: AstraZeneca, Celsion, Clovis Oncology, Eisai, Genentech/Roche, Karyopharm, Merck, Mersana, Takeda Pharmaceuticals, Tesaro/GSK;Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Arquer Diagnostics, AstraZeneca, Atossa, Clovis Oncology, Deciphera, Elevar Therapeutics, Imab, Mersana, Tesaro/GSK, Merck, Sutro Biopharma, Tora, GOG Partners;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Arquer Diagnostics, AstraZeneca, Atossa, Deciphera, Clovis Oncology, Eisai, Elevar Therapeutics, Imab, Merck, Mersana, Sutro Biopharma, Tesaro/GSK, Toray;Financial Interests, Personal, Leadership Role: GOG Partners, NYOB Society Secretary, SGO Clinical Practice Committee Chair, SGO COVID-19 Taskforce Co-Chair. L. Gilbert: Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Alkermes, AstraZeneca, Clovis, Esperas, IMV, ImmunoGen Inc, Karyopharm, Merck Sharp & Dohme, Mersana, Novocure GmbH, OncoQuest Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer, Roche, Tesaro;Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Merck, Alkermes, AstraZeneca, Eisai, Eisai-Merck, GlaxoSmithKline. R. Sabatier: Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: AstraZeneca, Eisai;Financial Interests, Personal, Other: AstraZeneca, GlaxoSmithKline, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche;Non-Financial Interests, Personal, Other: AstraZeneca, Bristol Myers Squibb, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Roche. J. Brown: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Caris, Clovis, Eisai, GlaxoSmithKline;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding: GlaxoSmithKline, Genentech. S. Ghamande: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Role: Seattle Genetics;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: GlaxoSmithKline;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Abbv e, Advaxis, Bristol Myers Squibb, Clovis, Genentech, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Roche, Seattle Genetics, Takeda. C. Mathews: Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Astellas, AstraZeneca, Deciphera, Moderna, GSK, Regeneron, Seattle Genetics;Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: IMAB biopharma. D. O'Malley: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, Tesaro/GSK, Immunogen, Ambry, Janssen/J&J, Abbvie, Regeneron, Amgen, Novocure, Genentech/Roche, GOGFoundation, Iovance, Eisai, Agenus, Merck, SeaGen, Novartis, Mersana, Clovis, Elevar, Takeda, Toray, INXMED, SDP Oncology (BBI), Arquer Diagnostics, Roche Diagnostics MSA, Sorrento, Corcept Therapeutics, Celsion Corp;Financial Interests, Personal, Funding: AstraZeneca, Tesaro/GSK, Immunogen, Janssen/J&J, Abbvie, Regeneron, Amgen, Novocure, Genentech/Roche, VentiRx, Array Biopharma, EMD Serono, Ergomed, Ajinomoto Inc, Ludwig Cancer Research, Stemcentrx, Inc, Cerulean Pharma, GOGFoundation, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Serono Inc, TRACON Pharmaceuticals, Yale University, New Mexico Cancer Care Alliance, INC Research, Inc, inVentiv Health Clinical, Iovance, PRA Intl, Eisai, Agenus, Merck, GenMab, SeaGen, Mersana, Clovis, SDP Oncology (BBI);Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Myriad Genetics, Tarveda. V. Boni: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: OncoArt, Guidepoint Global;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: Solti;Financial Interests, Personal, Other: START, Loxo, IDEAYA Biosciences;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: Sanofi, Seattle Genetics, Loxo, Novartis, CytomX Therapeutics, Pumo Biotechnology, Kura Oncology, GlaxoSmithKline, Roche/Genentech, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Menarini, Synthon, Janssen Oncology, Merck, Lilly, Merus, Pfizer, Bayer, Incyte, Merus, Zenith Epigenetics, Genmab, AstraZeneca, Seattle Genetics, Adaptimmune, Alkermes, Amgen, Array BioPharma, Boehringer Ingelheim, BioNTech AG, Boston Biomedical. A. Gravina: Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Gentili, Pfizer. S. Banerjee: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: Amgen, Genmab, Immunogen, Mersana, Merck Sereno, MSD, Roche, Tesaro, AstraZeneca, GSK, Oncxerna;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: Clovis, Pfizer, Tesaro, AstraZeneca, GSK, Takeda, Amgen, Medscape, Research to Practice, Peerview;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: PerciHealth;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: AstraZeneca, GSK, Tesaro;Non-Financial Interests, Principal Investigator, Phase II clinical trial Global lead, ENGOTov60/GOG3052/RAMP201: Verastem;Non-Financial Interests, Principal Investigator, ENGOT-GYN1/ATARI phase II international trial (academic sponsored): Astrazeneca;Non-Financial Interests, Advisory Role: Epsilogen;Non-Financial Interests, Other, Member of membership committee: ESGO;Non-Financial Interests, Advisory Role, Medical advisor to UK ovarian cancer charity: Ovacome Charity;Non-Financial Interests, Other, Received research funding from UK based charity I have provided medical advice (non-remunerated): Lady GardenFoundation Charity. R. Miller: Financial Interests, Personal, Other: AZD, Clovis Oncology, Ellipses, GlaxoSmithKline, MSD, Shionogi, AZD, GlaxoSmithKline;Financial Interests, Personal, Speaker’s Bureau: AZD, Clovis Oncology, GSK, Roche. J. Pikiel: Financial Interests, Personal, Other: Amgen, Clovis Oncology, GlaxoSmithKline, Incyte, Novartis, Odonate Therapeutics, Pfizer, Regeneron, Roche. M.R. Mirza: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, Biocad, GSK, Karyopharm, Merck, Roche, Zailab;Financial Interests, Personal, Invited Speaker: AstraZeneca, GSK, Karyopharm;Financial Interests, Personal, Stocks/Shares: Karyopharm;Financial Interests, Institutional, Research Grant: GSK, AstraZeneca, ultimovacs, Apexigen;Financial Interests, Institutional, Invited Speaker: Deciphera;Non-Financial Interests, Advisory Role: Ultimovacs, Apexigen. T. Duan: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: GlaxoSmithKline. G. Antony: Financial Interests, Personal, Fu l or part-time Employment: GlaxoSmithKline. S. Zildjian: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: GlaxoSmithKline. E. Zografos: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: GlaxoSmithKline. J. Veneris: Financial Interests, Personal, Full or part-time Employment: GlaxoSmithKline. A. Oaknin: Financial Interests, Personal, Advisory Board: AstraZeneca, Clovis Oncology, Deciphera Pharmaceuticals, Genmab, GSK, Immunogen, Mersana Therapeutics, PharmaMar, Roche, Tesaro, Merck Sharps & Dohme de España, SA, Agenus, Sutro, Corcept Therapeutics, EMD Serono, Novocure, prIME Oncology, Sattucklabs, Itheos, Eisai, F. Hoffmann-La Roche,;Financial Interests, Personal, Other, Travel and accomodation: AstraZeneca, PharmaMar, Roche;Financial Interests, Institutional, Funding: Abbvie Deutschland, Advaxis Inc., Aeterna Zentaris, Amgen, Aprea Therapeutics AB, Clovis Oncology Inc, EISAI limited LTD, F. Hoffmann –La Roche LTD, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Immunogen Inc, Merck, Sharp & Dohme de España SA, Millennium Pharmaceuticals Inc, PharmaMar SA, Tesaro Inc., Bristol Myers Squibb;Non-Financial Interests, Leadership Role, Executive Board member as a Co-Chair: GEICO;Non-Financial Interests, Leadership Role, Phase II Committee and Cervix Cancer Committee Representative on behalf of GEICO: GCIG;Non-Financial Interests, Officer, Chair of Gynaecological Track ESMO 2019. Scientific Track Member Gynaecological Cancers ESMO 2018, ESMO 2020, ESMO 2022. Member of Gynaecological Cancers Faculty and Subject Editor Gyn ESMO Guidelines.: ESMO;Non-Financial Interests, Member: ESMO, ASCO, GCIG, SEOM, GOG.

7.
Lessons from COVID-19: Impact on Healthcare Systems and Technology ; : 263-287, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2027812

ABSTRACT

Machine learning (ML) and artificial intelligence (AI) approaches are prominent and well established in the field of health-care informatics. Because they have a more productive ability to predict, they are successfully applied in several health-care applications. ML approaches are needed thanks to the unsatisfactory experience of the novel virus, considerable ambiguity, complicated social circumstances, and inadequate accessible data. Several approaches have been applied as a tool to combat and protect against the new diseases. The COVID-19 outbreak has rapid growth, so it is not easy to predict the patients and resources within a specified time. ML is a strong approach in the fighting against the pandemic such as COVID-19. It is found significant to predict the susceptible, infected, recovered, or exposed persons and can assist the control strategies to block the spread of infections. This study critically examines the appropriateness and contribution of AI/ML methods on COVID-19 datasets, enhancing the understanding to apply these methods for quick analysis and verification of pandemic databases. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

8.
Current Medical Issues ; 20(3):205-208, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2010410

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of coronavirus in 2019, the health-care workers (HCWs) are tirelessly battling through these unprecedented times. Although the pandemic has shaken the health-care systems globally due to its unpredictable course and spread, HCWs continue to remain on the frontline. the focus is always on patient care and limiting the spread amidst which the mental health and challenges faced by HCWs takes a back seat, the purpose of this opinion is to focus on the mental health issues HCWs are facing globally while fulfilling their duties. The article discusses the clinical features and risk factors and also provides evidence-based management strategies for posttraumatic stress disorder in HCWs.

9.
Gut ; 71:A5, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2005337

ABSTRACT

Introduction Faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) has been shown to have an acceptable positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of colorectal cancer (CRC). NHS-E/NICE COVID pandemic guidance recommends that patients with a FIT < 10μgHb/g do not need urgent colonic imaging but can be 'safety-netted' if not anaemic. Nonetheless concerns remain, that based on a FIT test alone up to 10% of patients with CRC might be missed by this approach, possibly due to the inherent risks of sampling error. The AIM of this study was to determine if the NPV and PPV of FIT could be improved by a strategy of duplicate FIT testing. Methods An observational cohort study of duplicate FIT testing of all patients referred on a Lower GI TWW pathway across 4 NHS provider trusts in the Lancashire and South Cumbria Cancer alliance from Jan2019-Feb 2021. FIT samples were analysed at a single centre using OC-sensor with a cut off > 10 0μgHb/g of faeces taken as a positive. CRC diagnoses were ascertained from local hospital records and cross referenced with the Somerset Cancer Registry. Results 28,622 of 30,105 (95%) referred patients (median [range] age 66y [16-103], 56% female) submitted duplicate FIT tests. 317/28,622 (1.1%) were diagnosed with CRC, of whom 22/317 (59%) were men. Of 18,952/28622 (66%) with two negative FIT tests, CRC was subsequently diagnosed in 7 patients (0.04%) with anaemia (n=7) and right sided tumours (n=6). In contrast, a single FIT strategy would have missed 22 patients of whom only 7 (32%) were anaemic. Interestingly duplicate FIT testing also improved the PPV, which increased from 0.3% if both tests were >10 - 100 0μgHb/g to a PPV of 14% if both tests were >100 0μgHb/g of faeces Conclusions A strategy of duplicate testing improves the NPV and PPV of FIT and should be considered as a mitigation to reducing missed cancer diagnosis. In patients at risk of CRC with no anaemia, duplicate FIT testing effectively rules out CRC and allows patients to be safely managed in primary care.

10.
Journal of General Internal Medicine ; 37:S190-S191, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1995866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Homelessness is a significant public health concern in the United States and is an important risk factor for poor health outcomes. There is limited data regarding the hospital utilization by this vulnerable population, especially inmanaged care settings. Historically, it has been difficult to identify patients experiencing homelessness at the population health level. In 2019, due to the passage of state law SB1152, hospitals across California now need standardized documentation policies for patients experiencing homelessness. This study assessed hospital readmission rates among hospitalized patients experiencing homelessness as identified through documentation in the electronic health record (EHR) as compared to the general hospitalized population within a large integrated health system. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study following adult patients (age≥18 years) hospitalized in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Medical Centers between 1/1/2019 through 12/1/2020. Patients were identified as homeless or housing insecure if they had SB1152 documentation, a homeless diagnosis code, or address history indicating homelessness within the extensive integrated KPNC EHR. A control group was created using 1:2 propensity score matching using Elixhauser comorbidities and demographics. Sensitivity analyses were performed to compare patients with an index hospitalization occurring during the COVID-19 shelter-in-place period between March 2020 and December 2020 with those whose index hospitalization occurred before this period. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission rate to the hospital or ED, and secondary outcomes included length of index hospitalization, and time to inpatient (IP) readmission. RESULTS: A total of 12,909 patients were included with 4,303 patients in the homeless group. Patients experiencing homelessness had increased odds for any 30-day readmission (OR 1.59;95% CI: 1.44-1.76), for inpatient readmission (OR 1.36;95% CI: 1.17-1.57), for ED readmission (OR 1.63;95% CI: 1.47-1.80), and had longer stays during their index hospitalization (IRR 1.12;95% CI: 1.04-1.21). The COVID-19 shelter-in-place period was not associated with any changes in the primary or secondary outcomes studied. CONCLUSIONS: Patients experiencing homelessness are at an increased risk for readmissions and longer hospitalizations compared to the general hospitalized population. Documentation of housing status following SB1152 has improved the ability to study hospital utilization among patients experiencing homelessness. Understanding patterns of hospital utilization in this vulnerable group will help providers to identify timely points of intervention for further social and healthcare support.

11.
QUALITATIVE & QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN LIBRARIES ; 11(2):307-317, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1935108

ABSTRACT

Webinars in Library and Information Science are on the rise during the COVID-19 period. This is much more visible in the Indian scenario. This article is an empirical study. This article gives a glimpse of the number & types of webinars in LIS from April 2020 to June 2021. The designation and gender of resource persons, the platforms of organization hosting these webinars, the frequency of the webinars and the subject matters of these webinars have all been focused clearly here. The methodology followed is the content analysis method of the various webinars held during COVID-19 period. The findings depict that total 460 national and international webinars were conducted during this COVID-19 period from April 2020 to June 2021, May and June 2020 were peak time of webinar 131 (28.47 %) followed by July 2020, 52 (11.30 %) and September 2020, 46 (10.00 %). This article therefore points towards the direction the subject Library and Information Science is heading and specially its design and ramifications in India.

12.
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATION ; 14(04):985-996, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1939413

ABSTRACT

An inclusive higher education policy incorporated in the National Education Policy (NEP) 2020 based on SDG 4: "ensuring inclusive and equitable quality education and supporting lifelong learning opportunities for everyone." This research work is a comparative analysis of the readiness of government and private hotel management institutes. For data National Council of Hotel Management colleges and top private hotel management colleges were approached. Descriptive statistics are used as a quantitative research tool. The case-study approach determines the relationship between known disabilities regarding the RPWD Act 2016. The study found that the RPWD ACT-2016 is familiar to the members of these inclusive institutes, and only a few have specially qualified faculty for such students. Also, research established Auxiliary departments as the most appropriate department for differently-abled students but not the core departments. Research limitations-The research period was between 'June 2020 to March 2021', during which many institutes were not operational due to the Covid-19 pandemics, so the response rate remains 50%. We tried to reach them over the phone, which was unsuccessful. More government-sponsored institutes should be accessible. At present, only 1/3 rd. of the total number has a provision for differently-abled students, which will not help in achieving U.N. SDG-4 goals of 100% accessibility by 2030 as targeted by the Government of India.

13.
Current Bioactive Compounds ; 18(6):19-27, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1928369

ABSTRACT

Phytosteroids are biologically active compounds found naturally in herb plasma mem-branes, with a chemical composition similar to animal plasma membrane cholesterol. It can be found in almost all fats abundant plant’s diets. One of the vital phytosterols is β-sitosterol which has several biological activities. It has been proved in various in-vivo and in-vitro research in which β-sitosterol stabilized several physiological activities like as antioxidant, CNS activity (like anti-alzheimer, anxiolytic and sedative effects, CNS depressant activity), lipid-lowering effects (like nonalcoholic fatty liver disease), antidiabetic, anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, anti-cancer and immunomodulatory, protective effects in pulmonary fibrosis, wound healing effects and anti-viral and COVID-19 activity. The experimental research on β-sitosterol shows that it can be used as a nutritional supplement to combat variousexisting diseases. In this review, we are high-lighting the most significant pharmacological action of β-sitosterol on the basis of available litera-ture.

14.
European Stroke Journal ; 7(1 SUPPL):460, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1928143

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: Optimal management of carotid artery freefloating thrombus (CAFFT) and CAFFT-related strokes remains unclear. We sought to examine the clinical characteristics, treatment strategies and patient outcomes for CAFFT-related ischaemic strokes. Methods: We conducted a single-centre retrospective observational study by extracting data from electronic patient records. We included consecutive patients admitted between 2016-2021 with ischaemic stroke and CAFFT on initial CT/MR angiogram. Results: We included 59 patients (mean age 63, 66% male). Vascular risk factors included hypertension (42%), diabetes (19%), dyslipidaemia (27%), previous stroke (10%), smoking history (56%) and alcohol excess (14%). 6 patients (10%) were COVID-19 positive. Median modified Rankin score was 0 and mean NIHSS was 11. On admission, 42% were taking antiplatelet agents, 10% were on anticoagulant, 34% had CRP >10mg/L, and 14% had eGFR <50 ml/min/1.73m2. On arrival, 27% received IV thrombolysis and 19% underwent mechanical thrombectomy. Acute antithrombotic strategies included IV heparin (49%), low molecular weight heparin (47%), oral anticoagulation (15%), and antiplatelet agents (63%). 24 patients (41%) were referred to vascular surgery, of whom 9 (38%, 15% of total) received emergency carotid endarterectomy. Neurological deterioration (<7 days) occurred in 14%. In-hospital mortality was 8% overall, but 67% for COVID-positive patients. At 6 months, recurrent stroke occurred in 12% and mortality was 3%. Conclusions: CAFFT-related ischaemic stroke is associated with significant mortality and neurological morbidity. The use of different acute antithrombotic strategies and emergency carotid endarterectomy varied significantly between patients. These major treatment options should be subjects of future clinical trials.

15.
19th International Conference on Humanizing Work and Work Environment, HWWE 2021 ; 391:739-750, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1919569

ABSTRACT

Unprecedented challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic led to the educational institutes close with uncertainty around the world. To continue the academic year most educational institutions have shifted to online educational platforms. Design institutes in India too adopted online classes using various online network platforms. Immersive media, such as Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR and AR) has recently gained prominence in design education. Many researchers have highlighted that the VR/AR could help students improve their performance and conceptual understanding of a specific set of learning objectives. This study has helped them to identify the most common difficulty faced during online courses like model making course. VR and AR based instruction setup that allows the collaborative discussions between faculty and students are remotely discussed. The brainstorming process was used to generate ideas for improving the learning experience in the dexterity skill-based model making course through the use of immersive media. Heuristics analysis was also conducted to ensure the usability of the AR and VR based instructional interfaces. It was observed that the interactive AR based immersive instructions are better than the VR based instructions. This study can be continued further with design students to determine how effective it is to use visual clues in a model-making course using Immersive media. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

16.
Current Nanoscience ; 18(4):409, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1917106
17.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(2):270-271, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1887277
18.
International Journal of Manpower ; : 20, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1883095

ABSTRACT

Purpose Even after COVID-19 pandemic, several organizations intend extending work-from-home (WFH), to the extent of making it permanent for many. However, WFH's impact on productivity remains uncertain. Therefore, this paper aims to study personal and job factors determining the likelihood of amount of work done at home being same/more vis-a-vis office. Design/methodology/approach Employees' basic psychological needs and job crafting tendencies;job-related aspects of task independence, technology resources and supervisory support;and several demographic factors are examined as determinants. Firth logistic regression analysis of data from 301 Indian white-collar employees is performed. Findings Demographically, longer exposure to WFH, greater work experience and being a support function worker increased the likelihood of same/greater amount of work done at home. Being a woman or married reduced the likelihood, while being a manufacturing/services worker was non-significant. Among psychological needs, greater needs for autonomy and relatedness decreased and increased the likelihood of same/greater amount of work done at home, respectively. Regarding personal and job resources, job crafting to increase structural job resources and supervisor support increased the likelihood of same/greater amount of work done at home versus office. Originality/value This paper adds to the limited India-centric literature on WFH;uniquely examining influences of individual personal attributes on amount of work done by combining job demands-resources (JD-R) model and basic psychological needs theory.

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