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1.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(4): 470-471, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778056
3.
Future Microbiol ; 17: 411-416, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1742148

ABSTRACT

Aim: To evaluate the role and perceptions of trainees during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: An online survey was designed to provide an insight into the significance of the COVID-19 pandemic on working conditions of infectious diseases and clinical microbiology trainees. Results: The main roles of trainees included management of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 (55%), research (53%) and diagnostic procedures (43%). The majority (82%) of trainees felt useful in managing the crisis. However, more than two-thirds felt more stressed and more tired compared with other rotations. Only 39% of the participants had access to psychological support. Conclusion: Due to the significant impact of the pandemic on infectious diseases and clinical microbiology trainees, further research should focus on their health and welfare in the post-pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Diseases/diagnosis , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 779118, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674348

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 is fundamentally a respiratory pathogen with a wide spectrum of symptoms. The COVID-19 related pancreatitis is less considered than other clinical features. The purpose is to describe two cases of pancreatitis associated with COVID-19. METHODOLOGY: Patients' demographics, clinical features, laboratory, and instrumental findings were collected. RESULTS: Two patients admitted to the hospital were diagnosed with COVID-19 and severe acute pancreatitis, according to the Atlanta criteria. Other causes of acute pancreatitis were excluded. Treatment included broad-spectrum antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors, and low molecular weight heparin. Steroids, oxygen, antifungal treatment, and pain killers were administered when appropriate. Both patients were asymptomatic, with normal vital parameters and blood exams, and were discharged in a good condition. CONCLUSION: It is recommendable to include lipase and amylase on laboratory routine tests in order to evaluate the need for the abdominal CT-scan and specific therapy before hospital admission of the patients with COVID-19 related life-threatening acute pancreatitis.

6.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(2): 222-238, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525742

ABSTRACT

SCOPE: In January 2021, the ESCMID Executive Committee decided to launch a new initiative to develop ESCMID guidelines on several COVID-19-related issues, including treatment of COVID-19. METHODS: An ESCMID COVID-19 guidelines task force was established by the ESCMID Executive Committee. A small group was established, half appointed by the chair, and the remaining selected with an open call. Each panel met virtually once a week. For all decisions, a simple majority vote was used. A long list of clinical questions using the PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) format was developed at the beginning of the process. For each PICO, two panel members performed a literature search with a third panellist involved in case of inconsistent results. Voting was based on the GRADE approach. QUESTIONS ADDRESSED BY THE GUIDELINE AND RECOMMENDATIONS: A synthesis of the available evidence and recommendations is provided for each of the 15 PICOs, which cover use of hydroxychloroquine, bamlanivimab alone or in combination with etesevimab, casirivimab combined with imdevimab, ivermectin, azithromycin and empirical antibiotics, colchicine, corticosteroids, convalescent plasma, favipiravir, remdesivir, tocilizumab and interferon ß-1a, as well as the utility of antifungal prophylaxis and enoxaparin. In general, the panel recommended against the use of hydroxychloroquine, ivermectin, azithromycin, colchicine and interferon ß-1a. Conditional recommendations were given for the use of monoclonal antibodies in high-risk outpatients with mild-moderate COVID-19, and remdesivir. There was insufficient evidence to make a recommendation for use of favipiravir and antifungal prophylaxis, and it was recommended that antibiotics should not be routinely prescribed in patients with COVID-19 unless bacterial coinfection or secondary infection is suspected or confirmed. Tocilizumab and corticosteroids were recommended for treatment of severe COVID-19 but not in outpatients with non-severe COVID-19. SCOPE: The aim of the present guidance is to provide evidence-based recommendations for management of adults with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). More specifically, the goal is to aid clinicians managing patients with COVID-19 at various levels of severity including outpatients, hospitalized patients, and those admitted to intensive care unit. Considering the composition of the panel, mostly clinical microbiologists or infectious disease specialists with no pulmonology or intensive care background, we focus only on pharmacological treatment and do not give recommendations on oxygen supplement/support. Similarly, as no paediatricians were included in the panel; the recommendations are only for adult patients with COVID-19. Considering the current literature, no guidance was given for special populations such as the immunocompromised.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Adult , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Future Microbiol ; 16: 687-695, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511960

ABSTRACT

Trainees represent the medical practice of tomorrow. Interactions and collaborations at the early stage in career will strengthen the future of our specialties, clinical microbiology and infectious diseases. Trainee networks at the national level help access the best education and career opportunities. The aim of this collaborative white paper between the Trainee Association of European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and four national trainee networks is to discuss the motivation for building such networks and offer guidance for their creation and sustainability even during a health crisis.


Subject(s)
Education, Medical/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Microbiology/education , Humans
8.
J Fungi (Basel) ; 7(11)2021 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1480834

ABSTRACT

Patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) have increased susceptibility to secondary respiratory infections including invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) is difficult to diagnose and can be associated with increased mortality especially in severe immunodeficiency such as hematological malignancies. Our study evaluates IPA in COVID-19 patients defined as COVID-19-CAPA among patients with acute leukemia (AL). A retrospective single-center study analyzed 46 patients with COVID-19 infection and acute leukemia, admitted to the Clinic for Haematology, Clinical Center of Serbia, Belgrade between the 2 April 2020 and 15 May 2021. During hospitalization, all participants were diagnosed with probable IPA according to the previous consensus definitions. Positive serology and galactomannan (GM) detection values in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum were used as microbiological criteria. COVID-19 associated probable IPA was found in 22% (9/41) tested patients, where serum GM and IgM anti-Aspergillus antibodies were positive in 12% (5/41) and 10% (4/41) had positive serology for aspergillosis. One patient died while eight recovered during follow-up. Our study showed that COVID-19 might be a risk factor for IPA development in patients with AL. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment are required as reported mortality rates are high.

9.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 716824, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328080
10.
Mycoses ; 64(10): 1238-1252, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314088

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to report clinical features, contributing factors and outcome of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated mucormycosis (CAM). METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive multicentre study was conducted on patients with biopsy-proven mucormycosis with RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 from April to September 2020. Demographics, the time interval between COVID-19 and mucormycosis, underlying systemic diseases, clinical features, course of disease and outcomes were collected and analysed. RESULTS: Fifteen patients with COVID-19 and rhino-orbital mucormycosis were observed. The median age of patients was 52 years (range 14-71), and 66% were male. The median interval time between COVID-19 disease and diagnosis of mucormycosis was seven (range: 1-37) days. Among all, 13 patients (86%) had diabetes mellitus, while 7 (46.6%) previously received intravenous corticosteroid therapy. Five patients (33%) underwent orbital exenteration, while seven (47%) patients died from mucormycosis. Six patients (40%) received combined antifungal therapy and none that received combined antifungal therapy died. CONCLUSION: Clinicians should be aware that mucormycosis may be complication of COVID-19 in high-risk patients. Poor control of diabetes mellitus is an important predisposing factor for CAM. Systematic surveillance for control of diabetes mellitus and educating physician about the early diagnosis of CAM are suggested.


Subject(s)
Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Amphotericin B/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/pathology , Caspofungin/therapeutic use , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diabetes Complications/microbiology , Diabetes Complications/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/pathology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , Mucormycosis/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/microbiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Triazoles/therapeutic use , Young Adult
11.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(11): 1595-1600, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284009

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has demonstrated the value of highly skilled and extensively trained specialists in clinical microbiology (CM) and infectious diseases (ID). Training curricula in CM and ID must constantly evolve to prepare trainees for future pandemics and to allow trainees to reach their full clinical and academic potential. OBJECTIVES: In this narrative review, we aim to outline necessary future adaptations in CM and ID training curricula and identify current structural barriers in training with the aim of discussing possibilities to address these shortcomings. SOURCES: We reviewed literature from PubMed and included selected books and online publications as appropriate. There was no time constraint on the included publications. CONTENT: Drawing from the lessons learnt during the pandemic, we summarize novel digital technologies relevant to CM and ID trainees and highlight interdisciplinary teamwork and networking skills as important competencies. We centre CM and ID training within the One Health framework and discuss gender inequalities and structural racism as barriers in both CM and ID training and patient care. IMPLICATIONS: CM and ID trainees should receive training and support developing skills in novel digital technologies, leadership, interdisciplinary teamwork and networking. Equally important is the need for equity of opportunity, with firm commitments to end gender inequality and structural racism in CM and ID. Policy-makers and CM and ID societies should ensure that trainees are better equipped to achieve their professional goals and are better prepared for the challenges awaiting in their fields.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , Infectious Disease Medicine/education , Microbiology/education , Specialization , COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Gender Equity , Humans , One Health , Pandemics , Racism
12.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 612758, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120237

ABSTRACT

In Europe, the first case of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and the first COVID-19-related death were reported in France on January 24th and February 15th, 2020, respectively. Officially, the first case of COVID-19 infection in the Republic of Serbia was registered on March 6th. Herein, we presented the first case of retrospective detection of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the post-mortem-obtained vitreous humor (VH), which took place on February 5th, 2020. This is the first death in Europe proven to be caused by COVID-19 by means of post-mortem histopathological and molecular analyses. Based on this finding, it appears that SARS-CoV-2 has been spreading faster and started spreading much earlier than it had been considered and that COVID-19 was probably the cause of the much-reported pneumonia of unknown origin in January and February 2020.

13.
Front Microbiol ; 11: 619498, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024512
14.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 14(5): 433-437, 2020 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-594985

ABSTRACT

We are living in times where a viral disease has brought normal life in much of the world to a halt. The novel coronavirus known as severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) started in December 2019 in Wuhan, China initially and in a short time crossed the European borders. After mitigating the epidemic in China, Italy became one of the most COVID-19 affected countries worldwide. International travelers are important sources of infectious diseases and a possible source of epidemic. Due to its political, geographic, and cultural similarities, Italy is one of the main economic partners of Southeast European (SEE) countries. Our data show that infection in index cases in all 11 SEE countries was travel-related with Italy being a source country for 8/11 countries. After the first case identifications on February 25, the number of cases in SEE countries is continually rising reaching the total number of 15,612 with 565 fatal cases and overall case fatality ratio (CFR) of 3.6 (median 3.8, range 0.8-5.5) by April 10, 2020. At a time when the COVID-19 pandemic is approaching its peak, apart from the problems with treatment of the disease and care for critically ill patients, there are other equally important problems, such as organization of outbreak response, provision of health care, lack of hospital personnel, disruption of personal protective equipment supply chains and health care workers (HCWs) protection. But what is more important is the heroic behavior of the HCWs who are showing their humanity by disregarding their lives.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Europe/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Travel-Related Illness
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