Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 15 de 15
Filter
1.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39 Suppl 133(6): 57-65, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1780514

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To analyse the frequency and characteristics of post-COVID-19 syndrome in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) affected by acute SARS-CoV-2 infection. METHODS: By the first week of April 2021, all centres included in the Big Data Sjögren Consortium were contacted asking for patients included in the Registry diagnosed with SARSCoV-2 infection according to the ECDC guidelines. According to the NICE definitions, symptoms related to COVID-19 were classified as acute COVID-19 (signs and symptoms for up to 4 weeks), ongoing symptomatic COVID-19 (presence of signs and symptoms from 4 to 12 weeks) and post-COVID-19 syndrome (signs and symptoms that continue for > 12 weeks not explained by an alternative diagnosis after a protocolized study). RESULTS: We identified 132 patients who were followed a mean follow-up of 137.8 days (ranging from 5 days to 388 days) after being diagnosed with COVID-19. In the last visit, 75 (57%) patients remained symptomatic: 68 (52%) remained symptomatic for more than 4 weeks fulfilling the NICE definition for ongoing symptomatic post-COVID-19, and 38 (29%) remained symptomatic for more than 12 weeks fulfilling the definition of post-COVID-19 syndrome. More than 40% of pSS patients reported the persistence of four symptoms or more, including anxiety/depression (59%), arthralgias (56%), sleep disorder (44%), fatigue (40%), anosmia (34%) and myalgias (32%). Age-sex adjusted multivariate analysis identified raised LDH levels (OR 10.36), raised CRP levels (OR 7.33), use of hydroxychloroquine (OR 3.51) and antiviral agents (OR 3.38), hospital admission (OR 8.29), mean length of hospital admission (OR 1.1) and requirement of supplemental oxygen (OR 6.94) as factors associated with a higher risk of developing post-COVID-19 syndrome. A sensitivity analysis including hospital admission in the adjusted model confirmed raised CRP levels (OR 8.6, 95% CI 1.33-104.44) and use of hydroxychloroquine (OR 2.52, 95% CI 1.00-6.47) as the key independent factors associated with an enhanced risk of developing post-COVID-19 syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study that analyses the frequency and characteristics of post-COVID-19 syndrome in patients affected by a systemic autoimmune disease. We found that 57% of patients with pSS affected by COVID-19 remain symptomatic after a mean follow-up of 5 months. The risk of developing post-COVID-19 syndrome in patients who required hospitalisation was 8-times higher than in non-hospitalised patients, with baseline raised CRP levels and the use of hydroxychloroquine being independent risk factors for post-COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sjogren's Syndrome , COVID-19/complications , Fatigue , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sjogren's Syndrome/diagnosis , Sjogren's Syndrome/drug therapy , Sjogren's Syndrome/epidemiology
3.
Clin Exp Rheumatol ; 39(1): 203-213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1068449

ABSTRACT

At the beginning of COVID-19, we underlined that this pandemic was a new challenge for rheumatologists. On the one hand, it was necessary to clarify the impact of this new viral disease on the natural history of many rheumatic diseases and, on the other hand, to define the beneficial or harmful effects of the synthetic or targeted therapies used for their treatment. In addition, we have postulated that in view of the common pathogenetic mechanisms involved, the therapeutic armamentarium currently employed in the management of viral or idiopathic systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases could be useful to control the "cytokine storm" induced by SARS-COV-2. One year later, in the present review we have analysed the progress of the knowledge on both these aspects and updated the algorithms initially proposed for a rational use of the synthetic and targeted anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents in the management of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rheumatologists , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Microorganisms ; 9(1)2021 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024613

ABSTRACT

Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) are blood preparations pooled from the plasma of donors that have been first employed as replacement therapy in immunodeficiency. IVIG interact at multiple levels with the different components of the immune system and exert their activity against infections. Passive immunotherapy includes convalescent plasma from subjects who have recovered from infection, hyperimmune globulin formulations with a high titer of neutralizing antibodies, and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). IVIG are used for the prevention and treatment of several infections, especially in immunocompromised patients, or in case of a poorly responsive immune system. The evolution of IVIG from a source of passive immunity to a powerful immunomodulatory/anti-inflammatory agent results in extensive applications in autoimmune diseases. IVIG composition depends on the antibodies of the donor population and the alterations of protein structure due to the processing of plasma. The anti-viral and anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG has led us to think that they may represent a useful therapeutic tool even in COVID-19. The human origin of IVIG carries specific criticalities including risks of blood products, supply, and elevated costs. IVIG can be useful in critically ill patients, as well as early empirical treatment. To date, the need for further well-designed studies stating protocols and the efficacy/tolerability profile of IVIG and convalescent plasma in selected situations are awaited.

6.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 608728, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000107

ABSTRACT

Objective: Since no data is available about the personal experience of people with primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) with regard to disease burden and management during the novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2 outbreak, we aimed to explore these aspects with the ultimate goal to identify unmet needs and priorities. Methods: A telephone consultation was scheduled with patients with pSS and information regarding the disease status, ongoing treatment and symptoms/diagnosis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) were collected. Clinical records were retrospectively evaluated to gather pre-COVID-19 information. Results: One hundred and two patients with pSS were contacted. Most rheumatology consultations and other pSS-related tests were canceled during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. Less than 30% of patients contacted the rheumatologist via telemedicine despite experiencing disease flares or therapy shortage. Disease activity and patient reported symptoms significantly worsened during the closure period. All patients practiced social distancing, most of those employed switched to smart working and different work settings impacted on the type of symptom worsening. Conclusion: This is the first study addressing the personal experience of pSS patients resulting from the impact of the SARS-CoV2 outbreak and it identifies unmet needs and priorities requiring to be addressed. Our findings may help designing individualized strategies.

7.
Panminerva Med ; 63(4): 491-498, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961992

ABSTRACT

Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory process mainly affecting the exocrine glands but also burdened by a wide range of extraglandular manifestations. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the most severe pSS complication worsening disease prognosis. We summarized original articles published between April 2018 and May 2020 on this topic aiming to highlight novelties on lymphoma and lymphomagenesis. Results have been grouped by epidemiology, etiopathogenesis and predictors of lymphoma. NHL is the most severe complication of pSS and occurs in around 5-10% of patients. Over the last two years, several clinical, serological, and histopathological features have been proposed as predictive for lymphoma in pSS patients, allowing early diagnosis and consequently, better management and prognosis. Individual monitoring for disease activity and possible lymphoma development is a central clue in the evaluation of pSS patients.


Subject(s)
Cryoglobulins , Lymphoma , Sjogren's Syndrome , Humans , Lymphoma/epidemiology , Sjogren's Syndrome/complications , Sjogren's Syndrome/epidemiology
8.
Reumatologia ; 58(5): 261-264, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934576
10.
Clinical and experimental rheumatology ; 38(4):754-759, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID | ID: covidwho-690515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 features include disseminated intravascular coagulation and thrombotic microangiopathy indicating a hypercoagulable state. We aimed to investigate antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) prevalence and clinical relationships in a large cohort of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We analysed the prevalence and titres of serum aPL in 122 patients with COVID-19 and 157 with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) and 91 with other autoimmune rheumatic diseases (oARD) for comparison. IgG/IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) and IgG/IgM anti-beta2glycoprotein I (β2GPI) were assayed using homemade ELISA, IgA aCL and anti-β2GPI by commercial ELISA kits and lupus anticoagulant (LAC) by multiple coagulation tests following updated international guidelines. RESULTS: Prevalence of IgG and IgM aCL and of IgG and IgM anti-β2GPI across COVID-19 patients were 13.4%, 2.7%, 6.3% and 7.1%, being significantly lower than in PAPS (p<0.0001 for all). Frequency of IgG aCL and IgM anti-β2GPI was comparable to oARD (13.4% vs. 13.2% and 7.1% vs. 11%, respectively), while IgG anti-β2GPI and IgM aCL were lower (p<0.01). IgA aCL and IgA anti-β2GPI were retrieved in 1.7% and 3.3% of COVID-19 patients, respectively. Positive LAC was observed in 22.2% COVID-19 vs. 54.1% of PAPS (p<0.0001) and 14.6% of oARD (p=0.21). Venous or arterial thromboses occurred in 18/46 (39.1%) COVID-19 patients and were not associated with positive aPL (p=0.09). CONCLUSIONS: Thrombosis is a frequent manifestation during COVID-19 infection. However, prevalence and titres of aPL antibodies or LAC were neither consistently increased nor associated with thrombosis when measured at a single timepoint, therefore not representing a suitable screening tool in the acute stage of disease.

11.
Immunol Res ; 68(4): 213-224, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-651271

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by a protean clinical picture that can range from asymptomatic patients to life-threatening conditions. Severe COVID-19 patients often display a severe pulmonary involvement and develop neutrophilia, lymphopenia, and strikingly elevated levels of IL-6. There is an over-exuberant cytokine release with hyperferritinemia leading to the idea that COVID-19 is part of the hyperferritinemic syndrome spectrum. Indeed, very high levels of ferritin can occur in other diseases including hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis, macrophage activation syndrome, adult-onset Still's disease, catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and septic shock. Numerous studies have demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of ferritin and its association with mortality and sustained inflammatory process. High levels of free iron are harmful in tissues, especially through the redox damage that can lead to fibrosis. Iron chelation represents a pillar in the treatment of iron overload. In addition, it was proven to have an anti-viral and anti-fibrotic activity. Herein, we analyse the pathogenic role of ferritin and iron during SARS-CoV-2 infection and propose iron depletion therapy as a novel therapeutic approach in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections , Ferritins/blood , Iron Chelating Agents/therapeutic use , Iron Overload , Iron/blood , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Iron Overload/blood , Iron Overload/drug therapy , Iron Overload/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
14.
J Autoimmun ; 111: 102468, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72188

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has posed the world at a pandemic risk. Coronavirus-19 disease (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by SARS-CoV-2, which causes pneumonia, requires intensive care unit hospitalization in about 10% of cases and can lead to a fatal outcome. Several efforts are currently made to find a treatment for COVID-19 patients. So far, several anti-viral and immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs have demonstrated some efficacy on COVID-19 both in vitro and in animal models as well as in cases series. In COVID-19 patients a pro-inflammatory status with high levels of interleukin (IL)-1B, IL-1 receptor (R)A and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been demonstrated. Moreover, high levels of IL-6 and TNF-α have been observed in patients requiring intensive-care-unit hospitalization. This provided rationale for the use of anti-rheumatic drugs as potential treatments for this severe viral infection. Other agents, such as hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine might have a direct anti-viral effect. The anti-viral aspect of immunosuppressants towards a variety of viruses has been known since long time and it is herein discussed in the view of searching for a potential treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Cytokines/antagonists & inhibitors , Cytokines/blood , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunomodulation/drug effects , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL