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1.
Journal of Young Pharmacists ; 13(2):91-96, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1346681

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus was renamed as coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the world health organization, began its spread in December 2019, in the city of Wuhan, China. Global bodies and governments weren't prepared to handle the impact of the virus on society. Nepal's landlocked nation encountered its incident confirmed case of COVID-19 during the first week of January, with the primary host being a student with a travel history from its place of inception. The nation is deficient in its health resources. The country mainly focused on the stringent implementation of washing of hands, wearing masks, restricting general movement, and maintaining social distancing in public. The disease transmission reached to the third stage, which began within three months after the confirmation of the first case of COVID-19. The lack of tropical hospitals, laboratory and diagnostic facilities added to the challenges faced by the country. This paper is a comprehensive review of the overall preparation and steps taken by the federal system of Nepal to combat the virus's effects till the third stage of transmission. It concludes with the practical limitations faced by the governing authorities of the nation while implementing these measures.

2.
Journal of Nepal Paediatric Society ; 40(3):148-156, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-993179

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The pandemic caused by coronavirus disease 2019 has adversely affected the health of all individuals including pregnant women. The susceptibility of pregnant women and their foetuses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection is not clearly known. The objective of this review is to summarise the available evidence on foetal and neonatal outcomes of pregnant women with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019. Methods: The review was conduced by searching the PubMed and MedRxiv databases for studies reporting outcome of pregnancy with confirmed coronavirus disease from December 2019 to April 2020 using combination of terms "pregnancy", "coronavirus disease 2019", "foetal outcome" and "neonatal outcome". Only peer reviewed articles reporting outcome of pregnancy with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 were included in the review irrespective of language. Ongoing pregnancies, induced abortion, and pregnancies without outcome were excluded from analysis. Variables extracted and analysed included gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, foetal and neonatal outcome. Results: In total, 21 studies consisting 230 pregnant women including three twin pregnancies were enrolled in the study. Fever and cough were the most common symptoms reported in pregnant women. One hundred and sixty-two (70.4%) pregnant women underwent cesarean section and there were 68 (29.6%) preterm deliveries. Eight babies tested positive out of 161 newborns that were tested for coronavirus infection. Among adverse outcomes reported, there were two miscarriages, two still births and only one neonatal death. Conclusions: Outcome of pregnancy with coronavirus disease 2019 in late trimester appears to be favourable. Occurrence of preterm delivery and cesarean section appear higher among infected pregnant women in comparison to general population. There was no conclusive evidence of vertical transmission.

3.
Kathmandu University Medical Journal ; 18(2):117-119, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-942033

ABSTRACT

The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 was reported on December 31, 2019 in Wuhan, China where the average case fatality rate was 6.1 +/- 2.9%. There are 453 deaths as of September 24, 2020 in Nepal. We report the first death of a 29-years-old postpartum woman due to COVID-19 in Nepal who was referred from a rural health center to Dhulikhel Hospital. On arrival, she was taken to the acute respiratory zone of the emergency department to provide immediate lifesaving procedures. Despite the repeated resuscitative measures, return of spontaneous circulation could not be achieved. The real time polymerase chain reaction test was positive. Our case report highlights the importance of early clinical suspicion, importance of "safety first" in healthcare settings, and the chain of management in such patients. We consider the fact that a postpartum woman registered as the first case of COVID-19 related death in Nepal to be an area of further study.

4.
Kathmandu University Medical Journal ; 18(2):21-28, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-941827

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is significantly affecting the healthcare system globally. As a result, healthcare workers need to be updated on the best practices for the proper management of the disease.

5.
Kathmandu University Medical Journal ; 18(2-70 COVID-19 Special Issue):101-103, 2020.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-847636

ABSTRACT

The first case of coronavirus disease 2019 was reported on December 31, 2019 in Wuhan, China where the average case fatality rate was 6.1 ± 2.9%. There are 453 deaths as of September 24, 2020 in Nepal. We report the first death of a 29-years-old postpartum woman due to COVID-19 in Nepal who was referred from a rural health center to Dhulikhel Hospital. On arrival, she was taken to the acute respiratory zone of the emergency department to provide immediate lifesaving procedures. Despite the repeated resuscitative measures, return of spontaneous circulation could not be achieved. The real time polymerase chain reaction test was positive. Our case report highlights the importance of early clinical suspicion, importance of “safety first” in healthcare settings, and the chain of management in such patients. We consider the fact that a postpartum woman registered as the first case of COVID-19 related death in Nepal to be an area of further study. © 2020, Kathmandu University. All rights reserved.

6.
Kathmandu University Medical Journal ; 18(2 70COVID-19 Special Issue):21-28, 2020.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-833666

ABSTRACT

Background COVID-19 is significantly affecting the healthcare system globally. As a result, healthcare workers need to be updated on the best practices for the proper management of the disease. Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practices (KAP) related to COVID-19 among healthcare personnel. Method This was a cross-sectional study conducted among medical personnel at Dhulikhel Hospital Kathmandu University Hospital using a semi-structured questionnaire on KAP related to COVID-19 from May 8th to June 8th, 2020. We analyzed survey data by using descriptive statistics. Spearman rank correlation, chi-square test and binary logistic analysis were used to examine the association between sociodemographic characteristics with KAP related to COVID-19. Result Among 220 participants, the majority were nurses (60%) followed by doctors (27.7%), paramedics (10%) and technicians (2.3%). The results showed that 68.6% of healthcare personnel had a good knowledge with appropriate practices (98.5%) and negative attitude (59.3%). In the multivariate binary logistic analysis, the healthcare workers with the clinical experience level of one to five years (OR:.42, 95% CI:.19-.96) and more than 5 years (OR:.16, 95% CI:.04-.63) were significantly associated with negative attitude. The confidence score for managing COVID-19 (OR:1.16, 95% CI:1.02-1.34) was significantly associated with an optimistic attitude. Conclusion Healthcare workers are knowledgeable about COVID-19 and proactively practising to minimize the spread of infection but lack optimistic attitudes. Hence, the constantly updated educational programmes related to COVID-19 for targeted groups will contribute to improving healthcare workers’ attitude and practices.

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