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1.
Journal of Medicine (Bangladesh) ; 24(1):28-36, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2296582

ABSTRACT

The death t toll of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has been considerable. Several risk factors have been linked to mortality due to COVID-19 in hospitals. This study aimed to describe the clinical characteristics of patients who either died from COVID-19 at Dhaka Medical College Hospital in Bangladesh. In this retrospective study, we reviewed the hospital records of patients who died or recovered and tested positive for COVID-19 from May 3 to August 31, 2020. All patients who died during the study period were included in the analysis. A comparison group of patients who survived COVID-19 at the same hospital during the same period was systematically sampled. All available information was retrieved from the records, including demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables. Of the 3115 patients with confirmed COVID-19 during the study period, 282 died.The mean age of patients who died was higher than that of those who survived (56.7 vs 52.6 years). Approximately three-fourths of deceased patients were male. History of smoking (risk ratio 2.3;95% confidence interval: 1.6-3.4), comorbidities (risk ratio: 1.5;95% confidence interal:1.1-2.1), chronic kidney disease (risk ratio: 3.2;95% confidence interval: 1.7-6.25), and ischemic heart disease (risk ratio:1.8;95% confidence interval: 1.1-2.9) were higher among the deceased than among those who survived. Mean C-reactive protein and D-dimer levels [mean (interquartile range), 34 (21-56) vs. 24 (12-48);and D-dimer [1.43 (1-2.4) vs. 0.8 (0.44-1.55)] were higher among those who died than among those who recovered. Older age, male sex, rural residence, history of smoking, and chronic kidney disease were found to be important predictors of mortality. Early hospitalization should be considered for patients with COVID-19 who are older, male, and have chronic kidney disease. Rapid referral to tertiary care facilities is necessary for high-risk patients in rural settings.Copyright © 2023 Hoque MM.

2.
International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies ; 10(1):52-59, 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2197256

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has busted the myth of the invincibility of globalisation. Borders are suddenly no longer that significant. Open spaces are becoming pertinent in urban reconstruction. At present, post-pandemic recovery is an important challenge globally. The need to develop modern urbanisation with planned cities that accommodate all sections of people is being universally acknowledged by experts. These cities need to be resilient, inclusive and sustainable. For cities to be sustainable, they need to utilise public spaces judiciously. The paper focuses on what makes cities sustainable in a post-pandemic world order and how India is navigating the challenges of urban reconstruction. The paper brings up the binary between public and private space and points out that wellness of individuals is very significant pointer in newly planned cities. The paper concludes that big cities are here to stay whatever be the predictions of naysayers.

3.
Kidney international reports ; 7(9):S469-S470, 2022.
Article in English | EuropePMC | ID: covidwho-2034331
4.
International Journal of Human Rights and Constitutional Studies ; 9(3):257-271, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1928307

ABSTRACT

Human rights, a significant issue in international politics has not received due attention until recently. Post-1945 world order made promises to keep citizens' rights secured but the COVID-19 pandemic exposed and deepened the already existent fissures in society. There is a humanitarian crisis across nations where egalitarian measures are few and far between. In South Asia, India and Pakistan are two important nations that witness rampant human rights violations, which aggravated in this pandemic. One country experiences civil-military rule desperate to flaunt its democratic credentials and the other, its bete noire, is carrying on its exclusionary policies in the garb of tackling the crisis as it has unleashed its authoritarian measures despite being the largest democracy in the world. Both countries have failed its citizens.

5.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research ; 16(4):OC28-OC31, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1856272

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In view of the present Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic it is of utmost importance to look out for the 'trojan horse' that is the asymptomatic population who are potential for spreading the disease. Healthcare Workers (HCWs) are the most vulnerable group. The possibility of having the infection does not always correlate well with the symptoms. It urges the need for development of certain special plans beyond continuous surveillance and symptom monitoring. Aim: To explore asymptomatic COVID-19 infection among HCWs as a potential source of transmission. Materials and Methods: This hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India, from June 2020 to September 2020. The data were collected from 714 HCWs over a period of three months of study period, with the help of a standard questionnaire and blood sample was analysed by serological assessment of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) by EUROIMMUN Kit, Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA). Epi info software 7, available from the World Health Organization (WHO) site was used to manage and analyse the data. Results: The mean age was 35.30 +/- 11.79 years. Out of 714 people, 54.8% (391/714) were male and 45.2% (323/714) were female. In this survey, 9.16% of HCWs in COVID-19 designated duties were IgG positive;whereas 21.89% of HCWs designated in other parts of area were detected to be IgG positive. Seroprevalence was least amongst nursing staffs with 5.41% (8/148);among doctor's it was 9.62% (41/426). Most interestingly among ward boys and cleaners this prevalence was found to be 29.90% (29/97) being the highest. Overall seroprevalence for IgG against SARS-CoV-2 was found to be 12.75% (91/714). Conclusion: This serosurvey at this tertiary COVID-19 care facility is a unique venture to look for the possible sources of super-spread. The high rate of sero-positivity among ward boys and cleaners might be due to their lack of knowledge and training regarding steps to prevent a droplet borne pandemic. This study also points out that if adequate precautions are taken, infectivity is not to an alarming extent, even in a full-fledged COVID-19 care hospital.

6.
Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health ; 50(3):519-526, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1438779

ABSTRACT

Background: To determine the impact of multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS) caused by novel coronavirus infectious disease-2019 (nCOVID-19) more investigations are needed related to children and adolescents. Among several inflammatory markers, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PC), ferritin (F) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) can be easily done among infected cases to assess the inflammatory status even in asymptomatic cases. Objective: A systematic review and meta-analysis to compare MIS and non-MIS cases in relation to elevation of inflammatory marker in children and adolescents due to nCOVID-19. Method: Studies providing data on the prevalence of n-COVID-19 in children and adolescents (<21 years) were compared between MIS and non-MIS groups. All studies were selected from PubMed and other electronic database and PRISMA guidelines were followed for data abstracting. During screening and quality assessment, each article has been evaluated by two reviewers independently. For each parameter, the rate ratio and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were compared between increased and non-increased group through Forest plot model. Results: The present study indicated elevated range of all studied markers in the children during nCOVID-19 outbreak. The Forest plot indicated low heterogeneity for three studied markers, which can be the important parameter for identifying clinical feature of MIS during nCOVID-19. Conclusions: All studied markers (CRP, PC, F and ESR) were elevated in children and adolescents during nCOVID-19 outbreak © 2021, Sri Lanka Journal of Child Health. All Rights Reserved.

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