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1.
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 15(9):400-409, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2080621

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate long-term effects of COVID-19, and to determine the risk factors in long-COVID in a cohort of the Turkish Thoracic Society (TTS)-TURCOVID multicenter registry. Method(s): Thirteen centers participated with 831 patients;504 patients were enrolled after exclusions. The study was designed in three-steps: (1) Phone questionnaire;(2) retrospective evaluation of the medical records;(3) face-to-face visit. Result(s): In the first step, 93.5% of the patients were hospitalized;61.7% had a history of pneumonia at the time of diagnosis. A total of 27.1% reported clinical symptoms at the end of the first year. Dyspnea (17.00%), fatigue (6.30%), and weakness (5.00%) were the most prevalent long-term symptoms. The incidence of long-term symptoms was increased by 2.91 fold (95% CI 1.04-8.13, P=0.041) in the presence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and by 1.84 fold (95% CI 1.10-3.10, P=0.021) in the presence of pneumonia at initial diagnosis, 3.92 fold (95% Cl 2.29-6.72, P=0.001) of dyspnea and 1.69 fold (95% Cl 1.02-2.80, P=0.040) fatigue persists in the early-post-treatment period and 2.88 fold (95% Cl 1.52-5.46, P=0.001) in the presence of emergency service admission in the post COVID period. In step 2, retrospective analysis of 231 patients revealed that 1.4% of the chest X-rays had not significantly improved at the end of the first year, while computed tomography (CT) scan detected fibrosis in 3.4%. In step 3, 138 (27.4%) patients admitted to face-to-face visit at the end of first year;at least one symptom persisted in 49.27% patients. The most common symptoms were dyspnea (27.60%), psychiatric symptoms (18.10%), and fatigue (17.40%). Thorax CT revealed fibrosis in 2.4% patients. Conclusion(s): COVID-19 symptoms can last for extended lengths of time, and severity of the disease as well as the presence of comorbidities might contribute to increased risk. Long-term clinical issues should be regularly evaluated after COVID-19. Copyright © 2022 Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine Produced by Wolters Kluwer Medknow.

4.
European Respiratory Journal ; 58:2, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1703172
5.
Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education ; 23(1):210-236, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1619143

ABSTRACT

This study examined the plagiarism rates of student teachers (hereafter students) during the distance education process and investigated the reasons for plagiarising. Qualitative dominant sequential exploratory design was used. The sample consisted of students studying at two different universities in Turkey. The study group was determined in two stages as a quantitative sample and a qualitative participant group. To select the quantitative sample, the maximum diversity sampling was used, while the criterion sampling method was utilized for the qualitative participant group. The data were collected in two stages as quantitative and qualitative in accordance with the nature of the mixed-methods research. In the first stage, the assignments prepared by students were included in the plagiarism program and their similarity rates were determined. All assignments were coded according to the names of the students who prepared them. Then, the assignments with the highest and lowest rate of plagiarism were identified. In the next stage, qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with the students who prepared the aforementioned assignments. The interview questions were prepared to obtain in-depth information about why they plagiarized or did not plagiarize. Content analysis was applied to analyse the data, and meaningful findings were found. The findings were collected under five headings. According to the results, those with high plagiarism stated their reasons for plagiarism as their economic and social conditions were not suitable for research. On the other hand, those with low plagiarism considered plagiarism as an action such as stealing and being unfair.

6.
International Journal of Electrical and Computer Engineering ; 12(1):834-844, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1524573

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) altered the way of caregiving and the new pandemic forced the health systems to adopt new treatment protocols in which remote follow-up is essential. This paper introduces a proposed system to link a remote healthcare unit as it is inside the hospital. Two different network protocols;a global system for mobile communication (GSM) and Wi-Fi were used to simulate the heath data transfer from the two different geographical locations, using Raspberry Pi development board and Microcontroller units. Message queuing telemetry transport (MQTT) protocol was employed to transfer the measured data from the healthcare unit to the hospital's Gateway. The gateway is used to route the aggregated health data from healthcare units to the hospital server, doctors' dashboards, and the further processing. The system was successfully implemented and tested, where the experimental tests show that the remote healthcare units using a GSM network consumed about 900 mWh. A high percentage of success data packets transfer was recorded within the network framework as it reaches 99.89% with an average round trip time (RTT) of 7.5 milliseconds and a data transfer rate up to 12.3 kbps. © This is an open access article under the CC BY-SA license.

8.
American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine ; 203(9), 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1277489

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by the SARS-CoV-2, has been affecting the world since the end of 2019. Turkey is severely affected with the first case being reported on March 11th 2020. Several studies suggest an association between air pollution and the spread of the infection, and that ambient particulate matters (PM) can present a potential, as virus carriers. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA on ambient PM. METHODS: Ambient PM samples in various size ranges were collected from 13 sites including urban, urban background locations and hospital gardens in 10 cities including Istanbul, Ankara, Izmir, Zonguldak, Tekirdag, Eskisehir, Bolu, Bursa, Konya, and Antalya across Turkey, between 13th of May and 14th of June, 2020. The nucleocapsid (N) 1 gene and RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) gene expressions were analyzed in PM samples for the presence of SARS-CoV-2 by applying quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and three dimensional (3D)-digital PCR methods. RESULTS: A total of 155 daily samples (Total Suspended Particulate [TSP], n=80;PM2.5, n=33;PM2.5-10, n=23;PM10, n=19;and 6 size segregated, n=48) were collected using various samplers in the each city. According to RT-PCR and 3D-RT-PCR analysis, dual RdRP and N1 gene positivity were detected in 20 of the samples (9.8 %). The highest percentage of virus detection on PM samples was from hospital gardens in Tekirda Zonguldak, and Istanbul, especially in PM2.5 mode. Samples collected from two urban sites, Ankara and Eskisehir, were also positive. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 may be transported by ambient particles, especially at sites close to the infection hot-spots such as hospital gardens. Whether this has an impact on the spread of the virus infection remains to be determined.

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