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1.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311910

ABSTRACT

As part of a longitudinal household transmission study of pets living with persons with COVID-19 in Texas, two pets were confirmed to be infected with the SARS-CoV-2 B.1.1.7 variant of concern (VOC). The pets were a dog and a cat from the same household, sampled two days after their owner tested positive for COVID-19. The oral, nasal, and fur swabs for both pets tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 by qRT-PCR and consensus whole genome sequences from the dog and cat were 100 % identical and matched the B.1.1.7 VOC. Virus was isolated from the cat’s nasal swab. One month after initial detection of infection, the pets were re-tested twice at which time only the fur swabs (both pets) and oral swab (dog only) remained positive, and neutralizing antibodies for SARS-CoV-2 were present in both animals. Sneezing by both pets was noted by the owner in the weeks between initial and follow-up testing. This study documents the first detection of B.1.1.7. in companion animals in the United States, and the first genome recovery and isolation of B.1.1.7 variant of concern globally in any animal.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-307782

ABSTRACT

Transmission of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, from people to companion animals has been reported globally. Between March 2020 and January 2021, the United States reported 94 companion animals with SARS-CoV-2. While most animals with SARS-CoV-2 have mild illness, 10 animals (5 dogs, 5 cats) died around the time of SARS-CoV-2 diagnosis. In one dog, histopathologic changes suggest SARS-CoV-2 exacerbated a severe chronic respiratory disease and contributed to death. In one cat, SARS-CoV-2 was associated with histopathologic changes suggesting the virus caused clinical signs that resulted in euthanasia. In the remaining eight animals, SARS-CoV-2 infection was an incidental finding (4 dogs, 4 cats). This report provides evidence that in rare circumstances, SARS-CoV-2 can contribute to or cause death in companion animals with underlying conditions.

3.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-322796

ABSTRACT

Background: In recognition of the interconnected nature of complex challenges such as COVID-19, a collaborative, multisectoral, and transdisciplinary approach, referred to as One Health, has been employed to address sustainable development and strengthen global health security. Although significant investments have been made to build global health capacity, there has not been a large-scale effort to capture the lived experiences of those working in One Health-related sectors.Methods: We collected and analyzed perspectives from students, graduates, workers, and employers in One Health through a multinational online survey across numerous health disciplines and sectors. Respondents were recruited through professional networks.Findings: A total of 828 respondents from 66 countries participated, representing governmental and academic institutions and students, among others;57% were female, and 56% had completed professional health degrees. Interpersonal communication, communication with non-scientific audiences, and the ability to work in transdisciplinary teams were valued in the workplace. Employers indicated difficulty recruiting workers, while workers indicated limited availability of positions.Interpretation: Successful One Health workers use interpersonal skills and scientific knowledge to address complex health challenges. A misalignment in One Health definitions and expectations may be hindering the matching of job seekers and employers. As One Health has evolved to address food insecurity, emerging diseases, and antimicrobial resistance, it holds promise for supporting an interdisciplinary global health workforce that can make substantial progress on Sustainable Development Goals and improve global health security for all.Funding Information: This research was supported in part by and benefited from intellectual contributions from USAID’s PREDICT Project (JM and ET) and One Health Workforce -- Next Generation Projects (JM)Declaration of Interests: We declare no competing interests.Ethics Approval Statement: The project was determined to be exempt by the University of California, Davis, Institutional Review Board (IRB ID: 1312001-1).

4.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-296256

ABSTRACT

Background In early 2020, an outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 occurred among passengers and crew of the Diamond Princess cruise ship. During February 16–17, some US citizens, residents, and their partners voluntarily repatriated to the US from Japan. Methods We conducted a retrospective, longitudinal evaluation of repatriated travelers where the outcome of interest was a positive test for SARS-CoV-2. Travelers who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were isolated in hospitals or at home under county isolation orders and underwent serial testing by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) approximately every other day, as contemporaneous US guidance required two consecutive negative tests collected ≥24 hours apart and symptom improvement before release from isolation. Results Among quarantined repatriated travelers, 14% tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. One-fifth of infected travelers initially tested negative but were identified on subsequent testing. All infected travelers remained asymptomatic or developed mild symptoms during isolation. Many travelers remained in prolonged isolation because of persistent viral detection based on contemporaneous policies. Conclusion Our findings support testing within 3-5 days after possible SARS-CoV-2 exposure to comprehensively identify infections and mitigate transmission and lend support to symptom- and time-based isolation recommendations, rather than test-based criteria.

5.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-294830

ABSTRACT

Background Approximately 67% of U.S. households have pets. Limited data are available on SARS-CoV-2 in pets. We assessed SARS-CoV-2 infection in pet cohabitants as a sub-study of an ongoing COVID-19 household transmission investigation. Methods Mammalian pets from households with ≥1 person with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 were eligible for inclusion from April–May 2020. Demographic/exposure information, oropharyngeal, nasal, rectal, and fur swabs, feces, and blood were collected from enrolled pets and tested by rRT-PCR and virus neutralization assays. Findings We enrolled 37 dogs and 19 cats from 34 of 41 eligible households. All oropharyngeal, nasal, and rectal swabs tested negative by rRT-PCR;one dog’s fur swabs (2%) tested positive by rRT-PCR at the first animal sampling. Among 47 pets with serological results from 30 households, eight (17%) pets (4 dogs, 4 cats) from 6 (20%) households had detectable SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies. In households with a seropositive pet, the proportion of people with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 was greater (median 79%;range: 40–100%) compared to households with no seropositive pet (median 37%;range: 13–100%) (p=0.01). Thirty-three pets with serologic results had frequent daily contact (≥1 hour) with the human index patient before the person’s COVID-19 diagnosis. Of these 33 pets, 14 (42%) had decreased contact with the human index patient after diagnosis and none (0%) were seropositive;of the 19 (58%) pets with continued contact, 4 (21%) were seropositive. Interpretations Seropositive pets likely acquired infection from humans, which may occur more frequently than previously recognized. People with COVID-19 should restrict contact with animals. Funding Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Agriculture

6.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259706, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526685

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: China is vulnerable to zoonotic disease transmission due to a large agricultural work force, sizable domestic livestock population, and a highly biodiverse ecology. To better address this threat, representatives from the human, animal, and environmental health sectors in China held a One Health Zoonotic Disease Prioritization (OHZDP) workshop in May 2019 to develop a list of priority zoonotic diseases for multisectoral, One Health collaboration. METHODS: Representatives used the OHZDP Process, developed by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US CDC), to prioritize zoonotic diseases for China. Representatives defined the criteria used for prioritization and determined questions and weights for each individual criterion. A review of English and Chinese literature was conducted prior to the workshop to collect disease specific information on prevalence, morbidity, mortality, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) from China and the Western Pacific Region for zoonotic diseases considered for prioritization. RESULTS: Thirty zoonotic diseases were evaluated for prioritization. Criteria selected included: 1) disease hazard/severity (case fatality rate) in humans, 2) epidemic scale and intensity (in humans and animals) in China, 3) economic impact, 4) prevention and control, and 5) social impact. Disease specific information was obtained from 792 articles (637 in English and 155 in Chinese) and subject matter experts for the prioritization process. Following discussion of the OHZDP Tool output among disease experts, five priority zoonotic diseases were identified for China: avian influenza, echinococcosis, rabies, plague, and brucellosis. CONCLUSION: Representatives agreed on a list of five priority zoonotic diseases that can serve as a foundation to strengthen One Health collaboration for disease prevention and control in China; this list was developed prior to the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 pandemic. Next steps focused on establishing a multisectoral, One Health coordination mechanism, improving multisectoral linkages in laboratory testing and surveillance platforms, creating multisectoral preparedness and response plans, and increasing workforce capacity.


Subject(s)
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic , Zoonoses/prevention & control , Animals , China , Humans , Zoonoses/epidemiology , Zoonoses/transmission
7.
J Am Vet Med Assoc ; 259(9): 1032-1039, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1468297

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To establish a pathoepidemiological model to evaluate the role of SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first 10 companion animals that died while infected with SARS-CoV-2 in the US. ANIMALS: 10 cats and dogs that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and died or were euthanized in the US between March 2020 and January 2021. PROCEDURES: A standardized algorithm was developed to direct case investigations, determine the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and evaluate the role, if any, that SARS-CoV-2 infection played in the animals' course of disease and death. Using clinical and diagnostic information collected by state animal health officials, state public health veterinarians, and other state and local partners, this algorithm was applied to each animal case. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was an incidental finding in 8 animals, was suspected to have contributed to the severity of clinical signs leading to euthanasia in 1 dog, and was the primary reason for death for 1 cat. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This report provides the global community with a standardized process for directing case investigations, determining the necessity of certain diagnostic procedures, and determining the clinical significance of SARS-CoV-2 infections in animals with fatal outcomes and provides evidence that SARS-CoV-2 can, in rare circumstances, cause or contribute to death in pets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cat Diseases , Dog Diseases , Animals , COVID-19/veterinary , Cat Diseases/diagnosis , Cat Diseases/epidemiology , Cats , Dog Diseases/diagnosis , Dog Diseases/epidemiology , Dogs , Pets , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(4): 1015-1022, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150678

ABSTRACT

The ongoing global pandemic caused by coronavirus disease has once again demonstrated the role of the family Coronaviridae in causing human disease outbreaks. Because severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was first detected in December 2019, information on its tropism, host range, and clinical manifestations in animals is limited. Given the limited information, data from other coronaviruses might be useful for informing scientific inquiry, risk assessment, and decision-making. We reviewed endemic and emerging infections of alphacoronaviruses and betacoronaviruses in wildlife, livestock, and companion animals and provide information on the receptor use, known hosts, and clinical signs associated with each host for 15 coronaviruses detected in humans and animals. This information can be used to guide implementation of a One Health approach that involves human health, animal health, environmental, and other relevant partners in developing strategies for preparedness, response, and control to current and future coronavirus disease threats.


Subject(s)
Coronaviridae/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/veterinary , Disease Reservoirs/veterinary , Zoonoses/virology , Alphacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Animals , Animals, Wild , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Disease Reservoirs/virology , Host Specificity , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Zoonoses/epidemiology
9.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 26(9): 1998-2004, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-634848

ABSTRACT

To determine prevalence of, seroprevalence of, and potential exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) among a cohort of evacuees returning to the United States from Wuhan, China, in January 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional study of quarantined evacuees from 1 repatriation flight. Overall, 193 of 195 evacuees completed exposure surveys and submitted upper respiratory or serum specimens or both at arrival in the United States. Nearly all evacuees had taken preventive measures to limit potential exposure while in Wuhan, and none had detectable SARS-CoV-2 in upper respiratory tract specimens, suggesting the absence of asymptomatic respiratory shedding among this group at the time of testing. Evidence of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 1 evacuee, who reported experiencing no symptoms or high-risk exposures in the previous 2 months. These findings demonstrated that this group of evacuees posed a low risk of introducing SARS-CoV-2 to the United States.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Travel , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
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