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1.
Euro Surveill ; 27(20)2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1862542

ABSTRACT

We explored the risk factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 reinfections in Italy between August 2021 and March 2022. Regardless of the prevalent virus variant, being unvaccinated was the most relevant risk factor for reinfection. The risk of reinfection increased almost 18-fold following emergence of the Omicron variant compared with Delta. A severe first SARS-CoV-2 infection and age over 60 years were significant risk factors for severe reinfection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Protective Factors , Reinfection
3.
Expert Rev Vaccines ; : 1-8, 2022 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1778823

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Consolidated information on the effectiveness of COVID-19 booster vaccination in Europe are scarce. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We assessed the effectiveness of a booster dose of an mRNA vaccine against any SARS-CoV-2 infection (symptomatic or asymptomatic) and severe COVID-19 (hospitalization or death) after over two months from administration among priority target groups (n = 18,524,568) during predominant circulation of the Delta variant in Italy (July-December 2021). RESULTS: Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against SARS-CoV-2 infection and, to a lesser extent, against severe COVID-19, among people ≥60 years and other high-risk groups (i.e. healthcare workers, residents in long-term-care facilities, and persons with comorbidities or immunocompromised), peaked in the time-interval 3-13 weeks (VE against infection = 67.2%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 62.5-71.3; VE against severe disease = 89.5%, 95% CI: 86.1-92.0) and then declined, waning 26 weeks after full primary vaccination (VE against infection = 12.2%, 95% CI: -4.7-26.4; VE against severe disease = 65.3%, 95% CI: 50.3-75.8). After 3-10 weeks from the administration of a booster dose, VE against infection and severe disease increased to 76.1% (95% CI: 70.4-80.7) and 93.0% (95% CI: 90.2-95.0), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the ongoing vaccination campaign in Italy, where the administration of a booster dose four months after completion of primary vaccination is recommended.

4.
Ann Ist Super Sanita ; 58(1): 25-33, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1761028

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on all-cause mortality in Italy during the first wave of the epidemic, taking into consideration the geographical heterogeneity of the spread of COVID-19. METHODS: This study is a retrospective, population-based cohort study using national statistics throughout Italy. Survival analysis was applied to data aggregated by day of death, age groups, sex, and Italian administrative units (107 provinces). We applied Cox models to estimate the relative hazards (RH) of excess mortality, comparing all-cause deaths in 2020 with the expected deaths from all causes in the same time period. The RH of excess deaths was estimated in areas with a high, moderate, and low spread of COVID-19. We reported the estimate also restricting the analysis to the period of March-April 2020 (first peak of the epidemic). RESULTS: The study population consisted of 57,204,501 individuals living in Italy as of January 1, 2020. The number of excess deaths was 36,445, which accounts for 13.4% of excess mortalities from all causes during January-May 2020 (i.e., RH = 1.134; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.129-1.140). In the macro-area with a relatively higher spread of COVID-19 (i.e., incidence rate, IR): 450-1,610 cases per 100,000 residents), the RH of excess deaths was 1.375 (95% CI: 1.364-1.386). In the area with a relatively moderate spread of COVID-19 (i.e., IR: 150-449 cases) it was 1.049 (95% CI: 1.038-1.060). In the area with a relatively lower spread of COVID-19 (i.e., IR: 30-149 cases), it was 0.967 (95% CI: 0.959-0.976). Between March and April (peak months of the first wave of the epidemic in Italy), we estimated an excess mortality from all causes of 43.5%. The RH of all-cause mortality for increments of 500 cases per 100,000 residents was 1.352 (95% CI: 1.346-1.359), corresponding to an increase of about 35%. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis, making use of a population-based cohort model, estimated all-cause excess mortality in Italy taking account of both time period and of COVID-19 geographical spread. The study highlights the importance of a temporal/geographic framework in analyzing the risk of COVID-19-epidemy related mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
5.
BMJ ; 376: e069052, 2022 02 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759321

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To estimate the effectiveness of mRNA vaccines against SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe covid-19 at different time after vaccination. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Italy, 27 December 2020 to 7 November 2021. PARTICIPANTS: 33 250 344 people aged ≥16 years who received a first dose of BNT162b2 (Pfizer-BioNTech) or mRNA-1273 (Moderna) vaccine and did not have a previous diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: SARS-CoV-2 infection and severe covid-19 (admission to hospital or death). Data were divided by weekly time intervals after vaccination. Incidence rate ratios at different time intervals were estimated by multilevel negative binomial models with robust variance estimator. Sex, age group, brand of vaccine, priority risk category, and regional weekly incidence in the general population were included as covariates. Geographic region was included as a random effect. Adjusted vaccine effectiveness was calculated as (1-IRR)×100, where IRR=incidence rate ratio, with the time interval 0-14 days after the first dose of vaccine as the reference. RESULTS: During the epidemic phase when the delta variant was the predominant strain of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, vaccine effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2 infection significantly decreased (P<0.001) from 82% (95% confidence interval 80% to 84%) at 3-4 weeks after the second dose of vaccine to 33% (27% to 39%) at 27-30 weeks after the second dose. In the same time intervals, vaccine effectiveness against severe covid-19 also decreased (P<0.001), although to a lesser extent, from 96% (95% to 97%) to 80% (76% to 83%). High risk people (vaccine effectiveness -6%, -28% to 12%), those aged ≥80 years (11%, -15% to 31%), and those aged 60-79 years (2%, -11% to 14%) did not seem to be protected against infection at 27-30 weeks after the second dose of vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: The results support the vaccination campaigns targeting high risk people, those aged ≥60 years, and healthcare workers to receive a booster dose of vaccine six months after the primary vaccination cycle. The results also suggest that timing the booster dose earlier than six months after the primary vaccination cycle and extending the offer of the booster dose to the wider eligible population might be warranted.


Subject(s)
/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Immunization, Secondary/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , /administration & dosage , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Incidence , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
6.
Bulletin of the World Health Organization ; 100(2):161-167, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1690495

ABSTRACT

Problem After Italy's first national restriction measures in 2020, a robust approach was needed to monitor the emerging epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at subnational level and provide data to inform the strengthening or easing of epidemic control measures. Approach We adapted the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control rapid risk assessment tool by including quantitative and qualitative indicators from existing national surveillance systems. We defined COVID-19 risk as a combination of the probability of uncontrolled transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and of an unsustainable impact of COVID-19 cases on hospital services, adjusted in relation to the health system's resilience. The monitoring system was implemented with no additional cost in May 2020. Local setting The infectious diseases surveillance system in Italy uses consistent data collection methods across the country's decentralized regions and autonomous provinces. Relevant changes Weekly risk assessments using this approach were sustainable in monitoring the epidemic at regional level from 4 May 2020 to 24 September 2021. The tool provided reliable assessments of when and where a rapid increase in demand for health-care services would occur if control or mitigation measures were not increased in the following 3 weeks. Lessons learnt Although the system worked well, framing the risk assessment tool in a legal decree hampered its flexibility, as indicators could not be changed without changing the law. The relative complexity of the tool, the impossibility of real-time validation and its use for the definition of restrictions posed communication challenges. Situación Tras las primeras medidas nacionales de restricción en Italia en 2020, se necesitaba un enfoque sólido para supervisar la epidemia emergente de la coronavirosis de 2019 (COVID-19) a nivel subnacional y proporcionar datos que informaran sobre el refuerzo o la flexibilización de las medidas de contención de la epidemia. Enfoque Se adaptó la herramienta de valoración rápida de riesgos del Centro Europeo para la Prevención y el Control de las Enfermedades, al incluir indicadores cuantitativos y cualitativos de los sistemas nacionales de vigilancia existentes. Se definió el riesgo de la COVID-19 como una combinación de la probabilidad de transmisión descontrolada del coronavirus del síndrome respiratorio agudo grave de tipo 2 y de un efecto no sostenible de los casos de la COVID-19 en los servicios hospitalarios, y se ajustó en relación con la capacidad de recuperación del sistema sanitario. El sistema de supervisión se aplicó sin costes adicionales en mayo de 2020. Marco regional El sistema de vigilancia de las enfermedades infecciosas en Italia aplica métodos de recopilación de datos coherentes en todas las regiones y provincias autónomas descentralizadas del país. Cambios importantes Las valoraciones semanales de los riesgos mediante este enfoque fueron sostenibles en la supervisión de la epidemia a nivel regional entre el 4 de mayo de 2020 y el 24 de septiembre de 2021. La herramienta proporcionó valoraciones fiables de cuándo y dónde se produciría un rápido aumento de la demanda de servicios sanitarios si no se incrementaban las medidas de contención o mitigación en las tres semanas siguientes. Lecciones aprendidas Aunque el sistema funcionó bien, el hecho de enmarcar la herramienta de valoración de los riesgos en un decreto legal dificultó su flexibilidad, ya que los indicadores no se podían modificar sin cambiar la ley. La relativa complejidad de la herramienta, la imposibilidad de validación en tiempo real y su uso para la definición de las restricciones plantearon problemas de comunicación. Problème Après avoir pris ses premières mesures de restriction nationales en 2020, l'Italie avait besoin d'une approche solide pour surveiller l'épidémie naissante de maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) au niveau régional, et fournir les données permettant de renforcer ou d'alléger les mesures destinées à l'endiguer. Approche Nous avons adapté l'outil d'évaluation rapide des risques du Centre européen de prévention et de contrôle des maladies en y intégrant des indicateurs quantitatifs et qualitatifs issus des systèmes de surveillance nationaux existants. Pour définir le risque lié à la COVID-19, nous avons associé la probabilité d'une transmission incontrôlée du coronavirus 2 du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère, à l'impact immédiat des cas de COVID-19 sur les services hospitaliers, en procédant à des ajustements selon la résilience du système de soins de santé. Le dispositif de surveillance a été mis en oeuvre en mai 2020 sans entraîner de coûts supplémentaires. Environnement local En Italie, le système de surveillance des maladies infectieuses repose sur des méthodes uniformes de collecte de données dans les provinces autonomes et régions décentralisées à travers le pays. Changements significatifs Les évaluations des risques réalisées toutes les semaines avec cette approche ont permis de surveiller l'épidémie à l'échelle régionale du 4 mai 2020 au 24 septembre 2021. L'outil a identifié les dates et lieux susceptibles de connaître une augmentation rapide de la demande en services de soins de santé si aucune mesure supplémentaire de contrôle et de lutte n'était prise dans les trois semaines. Leçons tirées Bien que le système ait fonctionné, inscrire l'outil d'évaluation des risques dans un décret législatif a réduit sa flexibilité, car les indicateurs ne pouvaient être modifiés sans réformer la loi. La relative complexité de l'outil, l'impossibilité de procéder à une validation en temps réel et son usage pour imposer des restrictions ont posé des problèmes de communication. Проблема После первых национальных ограничительных мер в Италии в 2020 году потребовался активный подход для мониторинга зарождающейся эпидемии коронавирусной инфекции 2019 года (COVID-19) на субнациональном уровне и для предоставления данных для обоснования усиления или ослабления мер по борьбе с эпидемией. Подход Авторы адаптировали инструмент для оперативных оценок рисков Европейского центра по контролю и профилактике заболеваний, включив в него количественные и качественные показатели из существующих национальных систем эпиднадзора. Авторы определили риск COVID-19 как комбинацию вероятности неконтролируемой передачи тяжелого острого респираторного синдрома, вызванного коронавирусом-2, и разрушительного воздействия случаев COVID-19 на больничное обслуживание, которая скорректирована с учетом устойчивости системы здравоохранения. Система мониторинга была внедрена без каких-либо дополнительных затрат в мае 2020 года. Местные условия В системе эпиднадзора за инфекционными заболеваниями в Италии используются последовательные методы сбора данных по децентрализованным регионам и автономным провинциям страны. Осуществленные перемены Еженедельные оценки рисков с использованием данного подхода регулярно применялись при мониторинге эпидемии на региональном уровне с 4 мая 2020 года по 24 сентября 2021 года. Инструмент обеспечил надежную оценку того, когда и где может произойти быстрое увеличение спроса на медицинские услуги, если меры по борьбе или смягчению последствий не будут усилены в течение следующих 3 недель. Выводы Несмотря на то что система работала эффективно, включение инструмента для оценок рисков в юридические постановления ограничивало его гибкость, поскольку показатели не могли быть изменены без изменения закона. Относительная сложность инструмента, невозможность проверки в реальном времени и его использование для определения ограничений создают проблемы коммуникации. 问题 2020 年意大利首次实施全国性限制措施后,需要 采取可靠方法以监测新型冠状病毒肺炎 (新冠肺炎) 疫情在地方层面的蔓延情况,并提供数据以表明是否 需要加强或放松疫情控制措施。 方法 通过纳入现有国家监测系统的定量和定性指 标,我们调整了欧洲疾病预防和控制中心的快速风险 评估工具。我们将新型冠状病毒肺炎风险综合定义为 严重急性呼吸系统综合症冠状病毒 2 不受控制传播 的可能性以及新型冠状病毒肺炎病例对医院服务的非持续性影响,并根据卫生系统的顺应力进行了调整。 2020 年 5 月,在没有产生额外成本的前提下实施了监 测系统。 当地状况 意大利传染病监测系统在全国各个分散 的地区和自治省统一使用相同的数据收集方法。 相关变化 在 2020 年 5 月 4 日至 2021 年 9 月 24 日 期间,使用这种方法开展的每周风险评估在监测区域 层面疫情情况方面具有可持续性。该工具能够可靠地 评估,如果在接下来的 3 周内没有加强控制或缓解措 施,何时何地医疗保健服务需求会迅速增加。 经验教训 尽管该系统运作良好,但将风险评估工 具纳入法令范畴限制了其灵活性,因为若不更改法律, 则无法变更指标。该工具的相对复杂性、实时验证的 不可能性及其在法规限定方面的用途导致产生了沟通 挑战。

7.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-316625

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the association between deprivation and COVID-19 outcomes in Italy during pre-lockdown, lockdown and post-lockdown periods. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting: All municipalities in Italy with less than 50,000 population.Participants: 38,534,169 citizens and 222,875 COVID-19 cases reported to the Italian epidemiological surveillance were assigned to quintiles based on the deprivation index of their municipality of residence.Interventions: The COVID-19 pandemic during pre-lockdown, lockdown and post-lockdown from the 20th of February to the 15th of October of 2020.Main outcome measures: Multilevel negative binomial regression models, adjusting for age, sex, population-density and region of residence were conducted to evaluate the association between deprivation and COVID-19 incidence, case-hospitalisation rate and case-fatality. The association measure was the rate ratio. Results: During pre-lockdown, lockdown and post-lockdown, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) in the most deprived quintile with respect to the least deprived quintile were 1.17 (95% CI 0.98 to 1.41), 1.14 (1.03 to 1.27) and 1.47 (1.32 to 1.63), respectively. In those three periods, the case-hospitalization IRR were 0.68 (0.51 to 0.92), 0.89 (0.72 to 1.11) and 0.99 (0.81 to 1.22) and the case-fatality IRR were 0.92 (0.75 to 1.13), 0.95 (0.85 to 1.07) and 1.02 (0.73 to 1.41), respectively. Conclusions: During lockdown and post-lockdown, but not during pre-lockdown, a higher incidence of cases was observed in the most deprived municipalities compared with the least deprived ones. No differences in case-hospitalisation and case-fatality according to deprivation were observed in any period under study.

8.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311797

ABSTRACT

On March 10, 2020, Italy imposed a national lockdown to curtail the spread of COVID-19. Here we estimate that, fourteen days after the implementation of the strategy, the net reproduction number has dropped below the epidemic threshold - estimated range 0.4-0.7. Our findings provide a timeline of the effectiveness of the implemented lockdown, which is relevant for a large number of countries that followed Italy in enforcing similar measures.

9.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308578

ABSTRACT

In 2020, countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic implemented various non-pharmaceutical interventions to contrast the spread of the virus and its impact on their healthcare systems and economies. Using Italian data at different geographic scales, we investigate the relationship between human mobility, which subsumes many facets of the population's response to the changing situation, and the spread of COVID-19. Leveraging mobile phone data from February through September 2020, we find a striking relationship between the decrease in mobility flows and the net reproduction number. We find that the time needed to switch off mobility and bring the net reproduction number below the critical threshold of 1 is about one week. Moreover, we observe a strong relationship between the number of days spent above such threshold before the lockdown-induced drop in mobility flows and the total number of infections per 100k inhabitants. Estimating the statistical effect of mobility flows on the net reproduction number over time, we document a 2-week lag positive association, strong in March and April, and weaker but still significant in June. Our study demonstrates the value of big mobility data to monitor the epidemic and inform control interventions during its unfolding.

10.
EuropePMC;
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-327217

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 variant of concern Omicron was first detected in Italy in November 2021. Data from three genomic surveys conducted in Italy between December 2021 and January 2022 suggest that Omicron became dominant in less than one month (prevalence on January 3: 78.6%-83.8%) with a doubling time of 2.7-3.1 days. The mean net reproduction number rose from about 1.15 in absence of Omicron to a peak of 1.83 for symptomatic cases and 1.33 for hospitalized cases, while it remained stable for critical cases.

11.
Bull World Health Organ ; 100(2): 161-167, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674216

ABSTRACT

PROBLEM: After Italy's first national restriction measures in 2020, a robust approach was needed to monitor the emerging epidemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) at subnational level and provide data to inform the strengthening or easing of epidemic control measures. APPROACH: We adapted the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control rapid risk assessment tool by including quantitative and qualitative indicators from existing national surveillance systems. We defined COVID-19 risk as a combination of the probability of uncontrolled transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and of an unsustainable impact of COVID-19 cases on hospital services, adjusted in relation to the health system's resilience. The monitoring system was implemented with no additional cost in May 2020. LOCAL SETTING: The infectious diseases surveillance system in Italy uses consistent data collection methods across the country's decentralized regions and autonomous provinces. RELEVANT CHANGES: Weekly risk assessments using this approach were sustainable in monitoring the epidemic at regional level from 4 May 2020 to 24 September 2021. The tool provided reliable assessments of when and where a rapid increase in demand for health-care services would occur if control or mitigation measures were not increased in the following 3 weeks. LESSONS LEARNT: Although the system worked well, framing the risk assessment tool in a legal decree hampered its flexibility, as indicators could not be changed without changing the law. The relative complexity of the tool, the impossibility of real-time validation and its use for the definition of restrictions posed communication challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Ann Ist Super Sanita ; 57(4): 265-271, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1614145

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To evaluate the decline of antibodies induced by SARS-CoV-2 infection, the individuals resident in 5 municipalities of the Autonomous Province of Trento, Northern Italy, who resulted IgG positive for anti-SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (NC) in May 2020, were tested four months later. METHODS: Anti-SARS-CoV-2 NC antibodies were detected using the Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay. Samples that gave a negative result were re-tested using the Liaison SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay to assess anti-spike (S) S1/S2 antibodies. The fifty-percent tissue culture infective dose (TCID50) neutralizing assay was performed on a subgroup of formerly positive sera. Statistical analysis was performed by STATA version 16.1 (STATA Corp., College Station, Texas, USA). RESULTS: Overall, 480 out of 1159 participants became seronegative for anti-NC IgG antibodies. Age above 70 years and cough were associated with persistent anti-NC IgG levels. Most anti-NC IgG negative sera were positive for anti-S IgG (77.9%). The neutralization assay showed high concordance with anti-S antibodies positivity. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, a decline of anti-NC IgG values was recorded four months after the first evaluation. A high proportion of anti-NC seronegative individuals were positive for anti-spike IgG antibodies, which appear to persist longer and to better correlate with neutralization activity.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19 , Aged , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19 Serological Testing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 7272, 2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574987

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccination is allowing a progressive release of restrictions worldwide. Using a mathematical model, we assess the impact of vaccination in Italy since December 27, 2020 and evaluate prospects for societal reopening after emergence of the Delta variant. We estimate that by June 30, 2021, COVID-19 vaccination allowed the resumption of about half of pre-pandemic social contacts. In absence of vaccination, the same number of cases is obtained by resuming only about one third of pre-pandemic contacts, with about 12,100 (95% CI: 6,600-21,000) extra deaths (+27%; 95% CI: 15-47%). Vaccination offset the effect of the Delta variant in summer 2021. The future epidemic trend is surrounded by substantial uncertainty. Should a pediatric vaccine (for ages 5 and older) be licensed and a coverage >90% be achieved in all age classes, a return to pre-pandemic society could be envisioned. Increasing vaccination coverage will allow further reopening even in absence of a pediatric vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Italy , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination Coverage
14.
2021.
Preprint in English | Other preprints | ID: ppcovidwho-295429

ABSTRACT

Vaccination campaigns against COVID-19 are allowing the progressive release of physical distancing restrictions in many countries. However, the global spread of the highly transmissible Delta variant has likely suppressed the residual chances of SARS-CoV-2 elimination through herd immunity alone. Here we assess the impact of the vaccination program in Italy since its start on December 27, 2020 and evaluate possible prospects for reopening the society while at the same time keeping COVID-19 under control. To this aim, we propose a mathematical modeling framework where levels of social activity are adjusted to match the time-series of the net reproduction number as estimated from surveillance data. We compared the estimated level of social contacts, number of deaths, and transmission potential with those of a counterfactual scenario where the same epidemic trajectory is obtained in absence of vaccination. We then evaluate the prospective impact of different scenarios of vaccination coverage and different social activity levels on SARS-CoV-2 reproduction number. We estimate that by June 30, 2021, the COVID-19 vaccination program allowed the resumption of about half the social contacts that were recorded in pre-pandemic times;in absence of vaccination, only about one third could have been resumed to obtain the same number of cases, with the added cost of about 12,100 (95%CI: 6,600-21,000) extra deaths (+27%;95%CI: 15-47%) between December 27, 2020 and June 30, 2021. We show that the negative effect of the Delta variant diffusion in July was entirely offset by vaccination in the month of July and August 2021. Finally, we estimate that a complete return to the pre-pandemic life could be safely attained only if >90%, including children from 5 years on, will be vaccinated using mRNA vaccines developed in 2020. In any case, increasing the vaccination coverage will allow further margins for societal reopening even in absence of a pediatric vaccine. These results may support the definition of vaccination targets for countries that have already achieved a broad population coverage.

15.
Euro Surveill ; 26(47)2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538333

ABSTRACT

We assessed the impact of COVID-19 vaccination in Italy, by estimating numbers of averted COVID-19 cases, hospitalisations, ICU admissions and deaths between January and September 2021, by age group and geographical macro areas. Timing and speed of vaccination programme implementation varied slightly between geographical areas, particularly for older adults. We estimated that 445,193 (17% of expected; range: 331,059-616,054) cases, 79,152 (32%; range: 53,209-148,756) hospitalisations, 9,839 ICU admissions (29%; range: 6,434-16,276) and 22,067 (38%; range: 13,571-48,026) deaths were prevented by vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Aged , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 669209, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337690

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 dramatically influenced mortality worldwide, in Italy as well, the first European country to experience the Sars-Cov2 epidemic. Many countries reported a two-wave pattern of COVID-19 deaths; however, studies comparing the two waves are limited. The objective of the study was to compare all-cause excess mortality between the two waves that occurred during the year 2020 using nationwide data. All-cause excess mortalities were estimated using negative binomial models with time modeled by quadratic splines. The models were also applied to estimate all-cause excess deaths "not directly attributable to COVD-19", i.e., without a previous COVID-19 diagnosis. During the first wave (25th February-31st May), we estimated 52,437 excess deaths (95% CI: 49,213-55,863) and 50,979 (95% CI: 50,333-51,425) during the second phase (10th October-31st December), corresponding to percentage 34.8% (95% CI: 33.8%-35.8%) in the second wave and 31.0% (95%CI: 27.2%-35.4%) in the first. During both waves, all-cause excess deaths percentages were higher in northern regions (59.1% during the first and 42.2% in the second wave), with a significant increase in the rest of Italy (from 6.7% to 27.1%) during the second wave. Males and those aged 80 or over were the most hit groups with an increase in both during the second wave. Excess deaths not directly attributable to COVID-19 decreased during the second phase with respect to the first phase, from 10.8% (95% CI: 9.5%-12.4%) to 7.7% (95% CI: 7.5%-7.9%), respectively. The percentage increase in excess deaths from all causes suggests in Italy a different impact of the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the second wave in 2020. The decrease in excess deaths not directly attributable to COVID-19 may indicate an improvement in the preparedness of the Italian health care services during this second wave, in the detection of COVID-19 diagnoses and/or clinical practice toward the other severe diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Europe , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Health Place ; 71: 102642, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1330835

ABSTRACT

The objective was to investigate the association between deprivation and COVID-19 outcomes in Italy during pre-lockdown, lockdown and post-lockdown periods using a retrospective cohort study with 38,534,169 citizens and 222,875 COVID-19 cases. Multilevel negative binomial regression models, adjusting for age, sex, population-density and region of residence were conducted to evaluate the association between area-level deprivation and COVID-19 incidence, case-hospitalisation rate and case-fatality. During lockdown and post-lockdown, but not during pre-lockdown, higher incidence of cases was observed in the most deprived municipalities compared with the least deprived ones. No differences in case-hospitalisation and case-fatality according to deprivation were observed in any period under study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
18.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4570, 2021 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1328847

ABSTRACT

To counter the second COVID-19 wave in autumn 2020, the Italian government introduced a system of physical distancing measures organized in progressively restrictive tiers (coded as yellow, orange, and red) imposed on a regional basis according to real-time epidemiological risk assessments. We leverage the data from the Italian COVID-19 integrated surveillance system and publicly available mobility data to evaluate the impact of the three-tiered regional restriction system on human activities, SARS-CoV-2 transmissibility and hospitalization burden in Italy. The individuals' attendance to locations outside the residential settings was progressively reduced with tiers, but less than during the national lockdown against the first COVID-19 wave in the spring. The reproduction number R(t) decreased below the epidemic threshold in 85 out of 107 provinces after the introduction of the tier system, reaching average values of about 0.95-1.02 in the yellow tier, 0.80-0.93 in the orange tier and 0.74-0.83 in the red tier. We estimate that the reduced transmissibility resulted in averting about 36% of the hospitalizations between November 6 and November 25, 2020. These results are instrumental to inform public health efforts aimed at preventing future resurgence of cases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
19.
Vaccine ; 39(34): 4788-4792, 2021 08 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1301034

ABSTRACT

In Italy, the COVID-19 vaccination campaign started in December 2020 with the vaccination of healthcare workers (HCW). To analyse the real-life impact that vaccination is having on this population group, we measured the association between week of diagnosis and HCW status using log-binomial regression. By the week 22-28 March, we observed a 74% reduction (PPR 0.26; 95% CI 0.22-0.29) in the proportion of cases reported as HCW and 81% reduction in the proportion of symptomatic cases reported as HCW, compared with the week with the lowest proportion of cases among HCWs prior to the vaccination campaign (31 August-7 September). The reduction, both in relative and absolute terms, of COVID-19 cases in HCWs that started around 30 days after the start of the vaccination campaign suggest that COVID-19 vaccines are being effective in preventing infection in this group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
20.
Euro Surveill ; 26(25)2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288763

ABSTRACT

To assess the real-world impact of vaccines on COVID-19 related outcomes, we analysed data from over 7 million recipients of at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose in Italy. Taking 0-14 days post-first dose as reference, the SARS-CoV-2 infection risk subsequently decreased, reaching a reduction by 78% (incidence rate ratios (IRR): 0.22; 95% CI: 0.21-0.24) 43-49 days post-first dose. Similarly, hospitalisation and death risks decreased, with 89% (IRR: 0.11; 95% CI: 0.09-0.15) and 93% (IRR: 0.07; 95% CI: 0.04-0.11) reductions 36-42 days post-first dose. Our results support ongoing vaccination campaigns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
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