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Open Forum Infectious Diseases ; 8(SUPPL 1):S22-S23, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1746807

ABSTRACT

Background. Accurately identifying COVID-19 patients at-risk to deteriorate remains challenging. Dysregulated immune responses impact disease progression and development of life-threatening complications. Tools integrating host immune-protein expression have proven useful in determining infection etiology and hold potential for prognosticating disease severity. Methods. Adults with COVID-19 were enrolled at medical centers in Israel, Germany, and the United States (Figure 1). Severe outcome was defined as intensive care unit admission, non-invasive or invasive ventilation, or death. Tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), interferon gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured using an analyzer providing values within 15 minutes (MeMed Key®). A signature indicating the likelihood of severe outcome was derived generating a score (0-100). Description of derivation cohort RT-PCR, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Results. Between March and November 2020, 518 COVID-19 patients were enrolled, of whom 394 were eligible, 29% meeting a severe outcome. Age ranged between 19-98 (median 61.5), with 59.1% male. Patients meeting severe outcomes exhibited higher levels of CRP and IP-10 and lower levels of TRAIL (Figure 2;p < 0.001). Likelihood of severe outcome increased significantly (p < 0.001) with higher scores. The signature's area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.81-0.91). Performance was not confounded by age, sex, or comorbidities and was superior to IL-6 (AUC 0.77;p = 0.033) and CRP (AUC 0.78;p < 0.001). Clinical deterioration proximal to blood draw was associated with higher signature score. Scores of patients meeting a first outcome over 3 days after blood draw were significantly (p < 0.001) higher than scores of non-severe patients (Figure 3). Moreover, the signature differentiated patients who further deteriorated after meeting a severe outcome from those who improved (p = 0.004) and projected 14-day survival probabilities (p < 0.001;Figure 4). TRAIL, IP-10, CRP and the severity signature score are differentially expressed in severe and non-severe COVID-19 infection Dots represent patients and boxes denote median and interquartile range (IQR) The signature score of patients meeting a severe outcome on or after the day of blood draw is significantly (p < 0.001) higher than the signature score of non-severe patients. Dots represents patients and boxes denote median and IQR Kaplan-Meier survival estimates for signature score bins Conclusion. The derived signature combined with a rapid measurement platform has potential to serve as an accurate predictive tool for early detection of COVID-19 patients at risk for severe outcome, facilitating timely care escalation and de-escalation and appropriate resource allocation.

2.
European Heart Journal ; 42(SUPPL 1):1147, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1553893

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic is an ongoing global pandemic. Jerusalem with its 919,400 inhabitants has a wide variety of populations, of which 62% are Jews (36% ultra-orthodox;64% non-ultraorthodox) and 38% Arabs which were largely affected by the pandemic. Objectives: The aim of our study was to understand the different presentations, course and clinical outcomes in these different ethnical and cultural groups in Jerusalem in the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: We performed a cohort study of all COVID-19 patients admitted between March 9 - July 16, 2020 to the two university medical centers in Jerusalem. Demographic data, presenting symptoms, comorbid conditions, medications, physical examination, laboratory and imaging data as well as outcome at 30-day were systematically recorded. Patients were divided according to their religion and ethnicity into 3 main groups: 1) Ultra- Orthodox Jews;2) other (non-Ultra-Orthodox) Jews and 3) Arabs. Results: Six hundred and two patients comprised the study population. Of them the 361 (60%) were Ultra-Orthodox Jews;166 (27.5%) non-Ultra- Orthodox Jews and 75 (12.5%) Arabs. The Arab patients were younger than the Ultra-Orthodox Jews and the non-Ultra-Orthodox Jews (51±18 year-old vs. 57±21 and 59±19, respectively, p<0.01), but suffered from significantly more co-morbidities. Fever, cough, dyspnea and fatigue, were more prominent, as presenting symptoms, in the Jewish patients as compared with the Arab patients. Moreover, hemodynamic shock, ischemic ECG changes and pathological chest x-ray were all more frequent in the Ultra-Orthodox patients as compared the other groups of patients. Being an Ultra-Orthodox was independently associated with significantly higher rate of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events (MACE) [OR=1.96;95% CI (1.03-3.71), p<0.05]. Age was the only independent risk factor associated with increased mortality rate [OR=1.10;95% CI (1.07-1.13), p<0.001]. Conclusions: The COVID-19 first phase in Jerusalem, affected different ethnical and cultural groups differently, with the Ultra-Orthodox Jews mostly affected by admission rates, presenting symptoms clinical course and MACE (Acute coronary syndrome, shock, cerebrovascular event or venous thromboembolism). It is conceivable that vulnerable populations need special attention and health planning in time of pandemic, to prevent rapid distribution and severe morbidity.

3.
Clinical & Experimental Rheumatology ; 39(6):1410-1412, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1539242

ABSTRACT

A 33-year-old woman developed palindromic rheumatism (PLR) several weeks following an infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Three months later, she developed full blown seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA) following COVID-19 reinfection. Although the occurrence of the joint diseases and the COVID-19 infections maybe fortuitous, knowing the enormous effects of COVID-19 infection on the human immune system, it is difficult to ignore the temporal relationship between the appearance of PLR after the first COVID-19 infection and the transition to full blown RA following her COVID-19 re-infection.

4.
Israel Medical Association Journal: Imaj ; 23(6):341, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279115
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