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1.
Children (Basel) ; 9(3)2022 Mar 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1731957

ABSTRACT

Monoclonal antibody therapies for COVID-19 have been frequently used in adults, whereas there are little data regarding the safety or efficacy of monoclonal antibody treatments in pediatric patients affected by COVID-19. We report our experience in the administration of mAb as a treatment for SARS-CoV-2 infection in children aged from 24 days to 18 years old.

2.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308828

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite SARS-CoV-2 immunizations have started in most countries, children are not currently included in the vaccination programs, thus it remains crucial to define their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response in order to minimize the risk for other epidemic waves. This study seeks to provide a description of the virology ad anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity in children with distinct symptomatology. METHODS: Between March and July 2020, we recruited 15 SARS-CoV-2 asymptomatic (AS) and 51 symptomatic children (SY), stratified according to WHO clinical classification. We measured SARS-CoV-2 viral load using ddPCR and qPCR in longitudinally collected nasopharyngeal swabs samples. To define anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies we measured neutralization activity and total IgG load (Diasorin). We also evaluated antigen-specific B and CD8+T-cells, using a labelled S1+S2 protein and ICAM expression, respectively. Plasma protein profiling was performed with Olink. RESULTS: Virological profiling showed that AS had lower viral load at diagnosis (p=0.004) and faster virus clearance (p=0.0002) compared to SY. Anti-SARS CoV-2 humoral and cellular response did not appear to be associated with the presence of symptoms. AS and SY showed similar titers of SARS-CoV-2 IgG, levels of neutralizing activity, and frequency of Ag-specific B and CD8+T-cells. Whereas pro-inflammatory plasma protein profile was associated to symptomatology. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated the development of anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral and cellular response with any regards to symptomatology, suggesting the ability of both SY and AS to contribute towards herd immunity. The virological profiling of AS suggested that they have lower virus load associated with faster virus clearance.

3.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-308616

ABSTRACT

Background: In early January 2020, a novel type of Coronavirus was identified in a patient affected by pneumonia of unknown origin. The virus will be named SARS-CoV-2 and the disease COVID-19 a month later by the International Committee on Virus Taxonomy.Italy is one of the first countries in the world affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, with 1.2% of all patients represented by children. Although the infection in children is often non severe and in the majority of cases does not require long term hospitalization, it is burdened with social issues and managing difficulties.To our knowledge there is no literature on telephonic follow up in pediatric patients with positive rhino-pharyngeal swab for SARS-CoV-2 after discharge.Materials and MethodsWe monitored through a telephonic follow-up, using a specific survey, 19 children aged between 8 months and 15 years, hospitalized in the “Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù” COVID Center with positive rhino-pharyngeal swab at discharge. We checked if any symptoms occurred at home until recovery, defined as two consecutive negative rhino-pharyngeal swabs.ResultsDuring the follow up 7 patients had mild and self-limited symptoms related to SARS-CoV-2 infection, while 2 patients were re-hospitalized, 1 patient had Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), the other patient had an increase in troponin a D-dimers.We didn’t miss any patient during the follow up.ConclusionWe demonstrated that daily telephonic follow up is safe in pediatric patients discharged with positive swab, it allows to avoid long term hospitalization and to promptly re-hospitalize children with major complication such as MIS-C.

5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572481

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, affecting all age groups with a wide spectrum of clinical presentation ranging from asymptomatic to severe interstitial pneumonia, hyperinflammation, and death. Children and infants generally show a mild course of the disease, although infants have been observed to have a higher risk of hospitalization and severe outcomes. Here, we report the case of a preterm infant with a severe form of SARS-CoV-2 infection complicated by cerebral venous thrombosis successfully treated with steroids, hyperimmune plasma, and remdesivir.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thrombosis , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , COVID-19/drug therapy , Child , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Infant, Premature , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thrombosis/drug therapy
6.
EuropePMC; 2021.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-296187

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV2 is a new coronavirus which started spreading in December 2019 from Wuhan, China. The seroprevalence of SARS-CoV2 antibodies allows to define a better picture of the spread of SARS-CoV2 infection in the population. The duration of SARS-CoV2 antibodies in the healthy population as well as in immunocompromised patients is still a topic of debate. HIV-infected people are at increased risk of developing complications from contracting a viral illness. Furthermore,their ability to develop and maintain an optimal immunological response to any kind of pathogen appears to be reduced.We analyzed the overall seroprevalence of SARS-CoV2 antibodies in 85 HIV infected-people on ART aged between 5 and 34 years old from May to January 2021. 88,2%of patients were in a good state of viroimmunological control: 23 showed a VL<40cp/ml and 52 had an undetectable VL. When positive for SARS-CoV2 serology, a confirmatory nasopharyngeal swab for PCR assessment and a second serological assay would be performed.Out of the 85 patients, 5 proved to be positive for SARS-CoV2 antibodies (rate of prevalence 5.8%). In all 5 cases the nasopharyngeal swabs were negative and the second assay for SARS-CoV2 antibodies performed in 4 out of 5 patients a week later was negative as well. The anamnestic recall brought no elements of suspicion for a past infection.The duration of SARS-CoV2 antibodies after COVID19 disease is still poorly understood in healthy population and additional studies will be needed to define the durability of humoral responses in immunocompromised children and in particular in HIV infected children under effective ART. It is still unknown whether ART or their immunological impairment may in part mitigate the pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, it will be interesting to analyze the impact of vaccination against SARS-CoV2 in HIV infected patients with a satisfactory virological control.

7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 684760, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389258

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is currently causing hundreds of deaths every day in European countries, mostly in not yet vaccinated elderly. Vaccine shortage poses relevant challenges to health authorities, called to act promptly with a scarcity of data. We modeled the mortality reduction of the elderly according to a schedule of mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine that prioritized first dose administration. For the case study of Italy, we show an increase in protected individuals up to 53.4% and a decrease in deaths up to 19.8% in the cohort of over 80's compared with the standard vaccine recalls after 3 or 4 weeks. This model supports the adoption of vaccination campaigns that prioritize the administration of the first doses in the elderly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Europe , Humans , Italy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 119, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1319490

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 infection in children is often non severe and in the majority of cases does not require long term hospitalization, nevertheless it is burdened with social issues and managing difficulties. To our knowledge there is no literature on telephonic follow up in pediatric patients with positive PCR for SARS-CoV-2 on rhino-pharyngeal swab after discharge. The aim of the study is to describe our experience in a telephonic follow up which can allow early and safe discharge from hospital while keeping the patients under close clinical monitoring. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Sixty-five children were admitted for SARS-CoV-2 infection at Bambino Gesù Pediatric Hospital COVID Center from 16th March to 3rd July. We monitored through a telephonic follow-up, using a specific survey, the patients discharged still presenting a positive PCR for SARS-CoV-2. We checked if any symptoms occurred at home until recovery, defined as two consecutive negative PCR for SARS-CoV-2 on rhino-pharyngeal swabs. RESULTS: During the follow up 7 patients had mild and self-limited symptoms related to SARS-CoV-2 infection, while 2 patients were re-hospitalized. One patient had Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C), the other patient had an increase in troponin and D-dimers. We also monitored the average time of viral shedding, resulting in a median duration of 28 days. CONCLUSION: Our experience describes the daily telephonic follow up as safe in pediatric patients discharged with positive PCR. As a matter of fact it could avoid long term hospitalization and allow to promptly re-hospitalize children with major complications such as MIS-C.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Continuity of Patient Care , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Telephone , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Patient Discharge , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Virus Shedding
9.
Pediatr Allergy Immunol ; 32(8): 1833-1842, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282025

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although SARS-CoV-2 immunizations have started in most countries, children are not currently included in the vaccination programs; thus, it remains crucial to define their anti-SARS-CoV-2 immune response in order to minimize the risk for other epidemic waves. This study sought to provide a description of the virology ad anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunity in children with distinct symptomatology. METHODS: Between March and July 2020, we recruited 15 SARS-CoV-2 asymptomatic (AS) and 51 symptomatic (SY) children, stratified according to WHO clinical classification. We measured SARS-CoV-2 viral load using ddPCR and qPCR in longitudinally collected nasopharyngeal swab samples. To define anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, we measured neutralization activity and total IgG load (DiaSorin). We also evaluated antigen-specific B and CD8+T cells, using a labeled S1+S2 protein and ICAM expression, respectively. Plasma protein profiling was performed with Olink. RESULTS: Virological profiling showed that AS patients had lower viral load at diagnosis (p = .004) and faster virus clearance (p = .0002) compared with SY patients. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral and cellular response did not appear to be associated with the presence of symptoms. AS and SY patients showed similar titers of SARS-CoV-2 IgG, levels of neutralizing activity, and frequency of Ag-specific B and CD8+ T cells, whereas pro-inflammatory plasma protein profile was found to be associated with symptomatology. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated the development of anti-SARS-CoV-2 humoral and cellular response with any regard to symptomatology, suggesting the ability of both SY and AS patients to contribute toward herd immunity. The virological profiling of AS patients suggested that they have lower virus load associated with faster virus clearance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Antibodies, Viral/blood , B-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Serologic Tests
10.
Ital J Pediatr ; 46(1): 180, 2020 Dec 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lately, one of the major clinical and public health issues has been represented by Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) during pregnancy and the risk of transmission of the infection from mother to child. Debate on perinatal management and postnatal care is still ongoing, principally questioning the option of the joint management of mother and child after birth and the safety of breastfeeding. According to the available reports, neonatal COVID-19 appears to have a horizontal transmission and seems to be paucisymptomatic or asymptomatic, compared to older age groups. The aim of this work is to describe a cluster of neonatal COVID-19 and discuss our experience, with reference to current evidence on postnatal care and perinatal management. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational case series of five mother-child dyads, who attended the Labor and Delivery Unit of a first-level hospital in Italy, in March 2020. Descriptive statistics for continuous variables consisted of number of observations, mean and the range of the minimum and maximum values. RESULTS: Five women and four neonates tested positive for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). In one case, the mother-child dyad was separated and the neonate remained negative on two consecutive tests. Two positive neonates developed symptoms, with a predominant involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Blood tests were unremarkable, except for a single patient who developed mild neutropenia. No complications occurred. CONCLUSIONS: We agree that the decision on whether or not to separate a positive/suspected mother from her child should be made on an individual basis, taking into account the parent's will, clinical condition, hospital logistics and the local epidemiological situation. In conformity with literature, in our study, affected neonates were asymptomatic or paucisymptomatic. Despite these reassuring findings, a few cases of severe presentation in the neonatal population have been reported. Therefore, we agree on encouraging clinicians to monitor the neonates with a suspected or confirmed infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious , Mothers , Postnatal Care , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Euro Surveill ; 25(18)2020 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197111

ABSTRACT

Data on features of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in children and adolescents are scarce. We report preliminary results of an Italian multicentre study comprising 168 laboratory-confirmed paediatric cases (median: 2.3 years, range: 1 day-17.7 years, 55.9% males), of which 67.9% were hospitalised and 19.6% had comorbidities. Fever was the most common symptom, gastrointestinal manifestations were frequent; two children required intensive care, five had seizures, 49 received experimental treatments and all recovered.


Subject(s)
Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Coinfection/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Adolescent , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Child, Preschool , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coinfection/virology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Diarrhea/etiology , Disease Outbreaks , Feces/virology , Female , Fever/etiology , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Noninvasive Ventilation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Protease Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/diagnosis , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
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