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1.
Clin Imaging ; 90: 71-77, 2022 Jun 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906895

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of barotrauma (pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema) in mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients. To describe the chest radiography patterns of barotrauma and understand the development in relation to mechanical ventilation and patient mortality. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of 363 patients with COVID-19 from March 1 to April 8, 2020. Primary outcomes were pneumomediastinum or subcutaneous emphysema with or without pneumothorax, pneumoperitoneum, or pneumoretroperitoneum. The secondary outcomes were length of intubation and death. In patients with pneumomediastinum and/or subcutaneous emphysema, we conducted an imaging review to determine the timeline of barotrauma development. RESULTS: Forty three out of 363 (12%) patients developed barotrauma radiographically. The median time to development of either pneumomediastinum or subcutaneous emphysema was 2 days (IQR 1.0-4.5) after intubation and the median time to pneumothorax was 7 days (IQR 2.0-10.0). The overall incidence of pneumothorax was 28/363 (8%) with an incidence of 17/43 (40%) in the barotrauma cohort and 11/320 (3%) in those without barotrauma (p ≤ 0.001). In total, 257/363 (71%) patients died with an increase in mortality in those with barotrauma 33/43 (77%) vs. 224/320 (70%). When adjusting for covariates, barotrauma was associated with increased odds of death (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.25-7.17). CONCLUSION: Barotrauma is a frequent complication of mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients. In comparison to intubated COVID-19 patients without barotrauma, there is a higher rate of pneumothorax and an increased risk of death.

2.
Clin Imaging ; 64: 35-42, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906892

ABSTRACT

As the global pandemic of coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) progresses, many physicians in a wide variety of specialties continue to play pivotal roles in diagnosis and management. In radiology, much of the literature to date has focused on chest CT manifestations of COVID-19 (Zhou et al. [1]; Chung et al. [2]). However, due to infection control issues related to patient transport to CT suites, the inefficiencies introduced in CT room decontamination, and lack of CT availability in parts of the world, portable chest radiography (CXR) will likely be the most commonly utilized modality for identification and follow up of lung abnormalities. In fact, the American College of Radiology (ACR) notes that CT decontamination required after scanning COVID-19 patients may disrupt radiological service availability and suggests that portable chest radiography may be considered to minimize the risk of cross-infection (American College of Radiology [3]). Furthermore, in cases of high clinical suspicion for COVID-19, a positive CXR may obviate the need for CT. Additionally, CXR utilization for early disease detection may also play a vital role in areas around the world with limited access to reliable real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) COVID testing. The purpose of this pictorial review article is to describe the most common manifestations and patterns of lung abnormality on CXR in COVID-19 in order to equip the medical community in its efforts to combat this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Radiography, Thoracic , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Radiography, Thoracic/instrumentation , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , X-Rays
3.
Semin Roentgenol ; 57(1): 40-52, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735310

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as the source of a global pandemic in late 2019 and early 2020 and quickly spread throughout the world becoming one of the worst pandemics in recent history. This chapter reviews the most up to date radiological literature and outlines the utility of thoracic imaging in COVID-19, defining both the common and the less typical imaging appearances during the acute and subacute phases of COVID-19. The short term complications and the long term sequela will also be discussed in the context of radiology, including pulmonary emboli, acute respiratory distress syndrome, superimposed infections, barotrauma, cardiac manifestations, pulmonary parenchymal scarring and fibrosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiography , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Radiology ; 295(3): 200463, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1723927

ABSTRACT

In this retrospective study, chest CTs of 121 symptomatic patients infected with coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) from four centers in China from January 18, 2020 to February 2, 2020 were reviewed for common CT findings in relationship to the time between symptom onset and the initial CT scan (i.e. early, 0-2 days (36 patients), intermediate 3-5 days (33 patients), late 6-12 days (25 patients)). The hallmarks of COVID-19 infection on imaging were bilateral and peripheral ground-glass and consolidative pulmonary opacities. Notably, 20/36 (56%) of early patients had a normal CT. With a longer time after the onset of symptoms, CT findings were more frequent, including consolidation, bilateral and peripheral disease, greater total lung involvement, linear opacities, "crazy-paving" pattern and the "reverse halo" sign. Bilateral lung involvement was observed in 10/36 early patients (28%), 25/33 intermediate patients (76%), and 22/25 late patients (88%).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Lung Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lung Diseases/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Young Adult
5.
EuropePMC; 2020.
Preprint in English | EuropePMC | ID: ppcovidwho-311452

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Develop AI-based automated CT image analysis tools for detection, quantification, and tracking of Coronavirus;demonstrate they can differentiate coronavirus patients from non-patients. Materials and Methods: Multiple international datasets, including from Chinese disease-infected areas were included. We present a system that utilizes robust 2D and 3D deep learning models, modifying and adapting existing AI models and combining them with clinical understanding. We conducted multiple retrospective experiments to analyze the performance of the system in the detection of suspected COVID-19 thoracic CT features and to evaluate evolution of the disease in each patient over time using a 3D volume review, generating a Corona score. The study includes a testing set of 157 international patients (China and U.S). Results: Classification results for Coronavirus vs Non-coronavirus cases per thoracic CT studies were 0.996 AUC (95%CI: 0.989-1.00) ;on datasets of Chinese control and infected patients. Possible working point: 98.2% sensitivity, 92.2% specificity. For time analysis of Coronavirus patients, the system output enables quantitative measurements for smaller opacities (volume, diameter) and visualization of the larger opacities in a slice-based heat map or a 3D volume display. Our suggested Corona score measures the progression of disease over time. Conclusion: This initial study, which is currently being expanded to a larger population, demonstrated that rapidly developed AI-based image analysis can achieve high accuracy in detection of Coronavirus as well as quantification and tracking of disease burden.

6.
Radiol Clin North Am ; 60(3): 359-369, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1616738

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is an easily transmissible coronavirus that emerged in late 2019 and has caused a global pandemic characterized by acute respiratory disease named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Diagnostic imaging can be helpful as a complementary tool in supporting the diagnosis of COVID-19 and identifying alternative pathology. This article presents an overview of acute and postacute imaging findings in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Diagnostic Imaging , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; : 1-9, 2022 Apr 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456223

ABSTRACT

Hundreds of imaging-based artificial intelligence (AI) models have been developed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. AI systems that incorporate imaging have shown promise in primary detection, severity grading, and prognostication of outcomes in COVID-19, and have enabled integration of imaging with a broad range of additional clinical and epidemiologic data. However, systematic reviews of AI models applied to COVID-19 medical imaging have highlighted problems in the field, including methodologic issues and problems in real-world deployment. Clinical use of such models should be informed by both the promise and potential pitfalls of implementation. How does a practicing radiologist make sense of this complex topic, and what factors should be considered in the implementation of AI tools for imaging of COVID-19? This critical review aims to help the radiologist understand the nuances that impact the clinical deployment of AI for imaging of COVID-19. We review imaging use cases for AI models in COVID-19 (e.g., diagnosis, severity assessment, and prognostication) and explore considerations for AI model development and testing, deployment infrastructure, clinical user interfaces, quality control, and institutional review board and regulatory approvals, with a practical focus on what a radiologist should consider when implementing an AI tool for COVID-19.

8.
Radiol Cardiothorac Imaging ; 2(3): e200210, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1155987

ABSTRACT

In this article we will review the imaging features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) across multiple modalities, including radiography, CT, MRI, PET/CT, and US. Given that COVID-19 primarily affects the lung parenchyma by causing pneumonia, our directive is to focus on thoracic findings associated with COVID-19. We aim to enhance radiologists' understanding of this disease to help guide diagnosis and management. Supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2020.

9.
Chest ; 160(1): 238-248, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1149107

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Chest radiography (CXR) often is performed in the acute setting to help understand the extent of respiratory disease in patients with COVID-19, but a clearly defined role for negative chest radiograph results in assessing patients has not been described. RESEARCH QUESTION: Is portable CXR an effective exclusionary test for future adverse clinical outcomes in patients suspected of having COVID-19? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Charts of consecutive patients suspected of having COVID-19 at five EDs in New York City between March 19, 2020, and April 23, 2020, were reviewed. Patients were categorized based on absence of findings on initial CXR. The primary outcomes were hospital admission, mechanical ventilation, ARDS, and mortality. RESULTS: Three thousand two hundred forty-five adult patients, 474 (14.6%) with negative initial CXR results, were reviewed. Among all patients, negative initial CXR results were associated with a low probability of future adverse clinical outcomes, with negative likelihood ratios of 0.27 (95% CI, 0.23-0.31) for hospital admission, 0.24 (95% CI, 0.16-0.37) for mechanical ventilation, 0.19 (95% CI, 0.09-0.40) for ARDS, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.29-0.51) for mortality. Among the subset of 955 patients younger than 65 years and with a duration of symptoms of at least 5 days, no patients with negative CXR results died, and the negative likelihood ratios were 0.17 (95% CI, 0.12-0.25) for hospital admission, 0.09 (95% CI, 0.02-0.36) for mechanical ventilation, and 0.09 (95% CI, 0.01-0.64) for ARDS. INTERPRETATION: Initial CXR in adult patients suspected of having COVID-19 is a strong exclusionary test for hospital admission, mechanical ventilation, ARDS, and mortality. The value of CXR as an exclusionary test for adverse clinical outcomes is highest among young adults, patients with few comorbidities, and those with a prolonged duration of symptoms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Radiography, Thoracic , Respiration Disorders , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Predictive Value of Tests , Radiography, Thoracic/methods , Radiography, Thoracic/standards , Radiography, Thoracic/statistics & numerical data , Respiration Disorders/diagnosis , Respiration Disorders/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Clin Imaging ; 77: 1-8, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated a complex interplay between comorbid cardiovascular disease, COVID-19 pathophysiology, and poor clinical outcomes. Coronary artery calcification (CAC) may therefore aid in risk stratification of COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Non-contrast chest CT studies on 180 COVID-19 patients ≥ age 21 admitted from March 1, 2020 to April 27, 2020 were retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists to determine CAC scores. Following feature selection, multivariable logistic regression was utilized to evaluate the relationship between CAC scores and patient outcomes. RESULTS: The presence of any identified CAC was associated with intubation (AOR: 3.6, CI: 1.4-9.6) and mortality (AOR: 3.2, CI: 1.4-7.9). Severe CAC was independently associated with intubation (AOR: 4.0, CI: 1.3-13) and mortality (AOR: 5.1, CI: 1.9-15). A greater CAC score (UOR: 1.2, CI: 1.02-1.3) and number of vessels with calcium (UOR: 1.3, CI: 1.02-1.6) was associated with mortality. Visualized coronary stent or coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) had no statistically significant association with intubation (AOR: 1.9, CI: 0.4-7.7) or death (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.0-12). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 patients with any CAC were more likely to require intubation and die than those without CAC. Increasing CAC and number of affected arteries was associated with mortality. Severe CAC was associated with higher intubation risk. Prior CABG or stenting had no association with elevated intubation or death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Artery Disease , Vascular Calcification , Adult , Biomarkers , Coronary Angiography , Coronary Artery Disease/diagnostic imaging , Coronary Vessels/diagnostic imaging , Humans , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Vascular Calcification/diagnostic imaging , Vascular Calcification/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Radiology ; 299(3): E262-E279, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072808

ABSTRACT

Infection with SARS-CoV-2 ranges from an asymptomatic condition to a severe and sometimes fatal disease, with mortality most frequently being the result of acute lung injury. The role of imaging has evolved during the pandemic, with CT initially being an alternative and possibly superior testing method compared with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) testing and evolving to having a more limited role based on specific indications. Several classification and reporting schemes were developed for chest imaging early during the pandemic for patients suspected of having COVID-19 to aid in triage when the availability of RT-PCR testing was limited and its level of performance was unclear. Interobserver agreement for categories with findings typical of COVID-19 and those suggesting an alternative diagnosis is high across multiple studies. Furthermore, some studies looking at the extent of lung involvement on chest radiographs and CT images showed correlations with critical illness and a need for mechanical ventilation. In addition to pulmonary manifestations, cardiovascular complications such as thromboembolism and myocarditis have been ascribed to COVID-19, sometimes contributing to neurologic and abdominal manifestations. Finally, artificial intelligence has shown promise for use in determining both the diagnosis and prognosis of COVID-19 pneumonia with respect to both radiography and CT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
Radiology ; 297(1): E197-E206, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-817842

ABSTRACT

Background Chest radiography has not been validated for its prognostic utility in evaluating patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Purpose To analyze the prognostic value of a chest radiograph severity scoring system for younger (nonelderly) patients with COVID-19 at initial presentation to the emergency department (ED); outcomes of interest included hospitalization, intubation, prolonged stay, sepsis, and death. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, patients between the ages of 21 and 50 years who presented to the ED of an urban multicenter health system from March 10 to March 26, 2020, with COVID-19 confirmation on real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were identified. Each patient's ED chest radiograph was divided into six zones and examined for opacities by two cardiothoracic radiologists, and scores were collated into a total concordant lung zone severity score. Clinical and laboratory variables were collected. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between clinical parameters, chest radiograph scores, and patient outcomes. Results The study included 338 patients: 210 men (62%), with median age of 39 years (interquartile range, 31-45 years). After adjustment for demographics and comorbidities, independent predictors of hospital admission (n = 145, 43%) were chest radiograph severity score of 2 or more (odds ratio, 6.2; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.5, 11; P < .001) and obesity (odds ratio, 2.4 [95% CI: 1.1, 5.4] or morbid obesity). Among patients who were admitted, a chest radiograph score of 3 or more was an independent predictor of intubation (n = 28) (odds ratio, 4.7; 95% CI: 1.8, 13; P = .002) as was hospital site. No significant difference was found in primary outcomes across race and ethnicity or those with a history of tobacco use, asthma, or diabetes mellitus type II. Conclusion For patients aged 21-50 years with coronavirus disease 2019 presenting to the emergency department, a chest radiograph severity score was predictive of risk for hospital admission and intubation. © RSNA, 2020 Online supplemental material is available for this article.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Radiography, Thoracic , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome , Young Adult
14.
Clin Imaging ; 67: 207-213, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733899

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We describe the presenting characteristics and hospital course of 11 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) patients who developed spontaneous subcutaneous emphysema (SE) with or without pneumomediastinum (SPM) in the absence of prior mechanical ventilation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 11 non-intubated COVID-19 patients (8 male and 3 female, median age 61 years) developed SE and SPM between March 15 and April 30, 2020 at a multi-center urban health system in New York City. Demographics (age, gender, smoking status, comorbid conditions, and body-mass index), clinical variables (temperature, oxygen saturation, and symptoms), and laboratory values (white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, D-dimer, and peak interleukin-6) were collected. Chest radiography (CXR) and computed tomography (CT) were analyzed for SE, SPM, and pneumothorax by a board-certified cardiothoracic-fellowship trained radiologist. RESULTS: Eleven non-intubated patients developed SE, 36% (4/11) of whom had SE on their initial CXR. Concomitant SPM was apparent in 91% (10/11) of patients, and 45% (5/11) also developed pneumothorax. Patients developed SE on average 13.3 days (SD: 6.3) following symptom onset. No patients reported a history of smoking. The most common comorbidities included hypertension (6/11), diabetes mellitus (5/11), asthma (3/11), dyslipidemia (3/11), and renal disease (2/11). Four (36%) patients expired during hospitalization. CONCLUSION: SE and SPM were observed in a cohort of 11 non-intubated COVID-19 patients without any known cause or history of invasive ventilation. Further investigation is required to elucidate the underlying mechanism in this patient population.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mediastinal Emphysema/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Subcutaneous Emphysema/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Mediastinal Emphysema/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Pneumothorax/epidemiology , Pneumothorax/etiology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Subcutaneous Emphysema/epidemiology , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods
16.
Eur Radiol ; 30(12): 6685-6693, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-631205

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe demographic, clinical, and lung base CT findings in COVID-19 patients presenting with abdominal complaints. METHODS: In this retrospective study, 76 COVID-19 patients who underwent abdominal CT for abdominal complaints from March 1 to April 15, 2020, in a large urban multihospital Health System were included. Those with positive abdominal CT findings (n = 14) were then excluded, with 62 patients undergoing final analysis (30M/32F; median age 63 years, interquartile range (IQR) 52-75 years, range 30-90 years). Demographic and clinical data were extracted. CT lung base assessment was performed by a cardiothoracic radiologist. Data were compared between discharged and hospitalised patients using Wilcoxon or Fisher's exact tests. RESULTS: The majority of the population was non-elderly (56.4%, < 65 years) and most (81%) had underlying health conditions. Nineteen percent were discharged and 81% were hospitalised. The most frequent abdominal symptoms were pain (83.9%) and nausea/vomiting/anorexia (46.8%). Lung base CT findings included ground-glass opacities (95.2%) in a multifocal (95.2%) and peripheral (66.1%) distribution. Elevated laboratory values (when available) included C-reactive protein (CRP) (97.3%), D-dimer (79.4%), and ferritin (68.8% of males and 81.8% of females). Older age (p = 0.045), hypertension (p = 0.019), and lower haemoglobin in women (p = 0.042) were more frequent in hospitalised patients. There was no difference in lung base CT findings between discharged and hospitalised patients (p > 0.165). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients can present with abdominal symptoms, especially in non-elderly patients with underlying health conditions. Lung base findings on abdominal CT are consistent with published reports. Radiologists should be aware of atypical presentations of COVID-19. KEY POINTS: • COVID-19 infected patients can present with acute abdominal symptoms, especially in non-elderly patients with underlying health conditions, and may frequently require hospitalisation (81%). • There was no difference in lung base CT findings between patients who were discharged and those who were hospitalised. • Lung base CT findings included multifocal and peripheral ground-glass opacities, consistent with published reports.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/diagnosis , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Abdominal Pain/etiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Thorac Imaging ; 35(4): 211-218, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613319

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia has become a global pandemic. Although the rate of new infections in China has decreased, currently, 169 countries report confirmed cases, with many nations showing increasing numbers daily. Testing for COVID-19 infection is performed via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, but availability is limited in many parts of the world. The role of chest computed tomography is yet to be determined and may vary depending on the local prevalence of disease and availability of laboratory testing. A common but nonspecific pattern of disease with a somewhat predictable progression is seen in patients with COVID-19. Specifically, patchy ground-glass opacities in the periphery of the lower lungs may be present initially, eventually undergoing coalescence, consolidation, and organization, and ultimately showing features of fibrosis. In this article, we review the computed tomography features of COVID-19 infection. Familiarity with these findings and their evolution will help radiologists recognize potential COVID-19 and recognize the significant overlap with other causes of acute lung injury.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Eur J Radiol Open ; 7: 100239, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-548750

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a viral pandemic that started in China and has rapidly expanded worldwide. Typical clinical manifestations include fever, cough and dyspnea after an incubation period of 2-14 days. The diagnosis is based on RT-PCR test through a nasopharyngeal swab. Because of the pulmonary tropism of the virus, pneumonia is often encountered in symptomatic patients. Here, we review the pertinent clinical findings and the current published data describing chest CT findings in COVID-19 pneumonia, the diagnostic performance of CT for diagnosis, including differential diagnosis, as well the evolving role of imaging in this disease.

19.
Clin Imaging ; 67: 1-4, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401515

ABSTRACT

As the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues to spread, some patients are presenting with abdominal symptoms without respiratory complaints. Our case series documents four patients who presented with abdominal symptoms whose abdominopelvic CT revealed incidental pulmonary parenchymal findings in the imaged lung bases and were subsequently confirmed positive for COVID-19 via laboratory testing. It remains to be seen whether these patients will eventually develop respiratory symptoms. While it is possible that the patients' abdominal complaints are coincidental with CT findings, it is interesting that patients can have such extensive incidental disease in the lungs on CT without respiratory symptoms.


Subject(s)
Abdominal Pain/complications , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Lung/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Young Adult
20.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 215(6): 1303-1311, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-342847

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study is to characterize the CT findings of 30 children from mainland China who had laboratory-confirmed coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Although recent American College of Radiology recommendations assert that CT should not be used as a screening or diagnostic tool for patients with suspected COVID-19, radiologists should be familiar with the imaging appearance of this disease to identify its presence in patients undergoing CT for other reasons. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We retrospectively reviewed the CT findings and clinical symptoms of 30 pediatric patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 who were seen at six centers in China from January 23, 2020, to February 8, 2020. Patient age ranged from 10 months to 18 years. Patients older than 18 years of age or those without chest CT examinations were excluded. Two cardiothoracic radiologists and a cardiothoracic imaging fellow characterized and scored the extent of lung involvement. Cohen kappa coefficient was used to calculate interobserver agreement between the readers. RESULTS. Among children, CT findings were often negative (77%). Positive CT findings seen in children included ground-glass opacities with a peripheral lung distribution, a crazy paving pattern, and the halo and reverse halo signs. There was a correlation between increasing age and increasing severity of findings, consistent with reported symptomatology in children. Eleven of 30 patients (37%) underwent follow-up chest CT, with 10 of 11 examinations (91%) showing no change, raising questions about the utility of CT in the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 in children. CONCLUSION. The present study describes the chest CT findings encountered in children with COVID-19 and questions the utility of CT in the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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