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2.
Social Inclusion ; 10(2):160-171, 2022.
Article in English | English Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1884799

ABSTRACT

The recent Covid-19 global health pandemic has negatively affected the political and economic development of communities around the world. This article shares the lessons from our multi-country project Safe, Inclusive Participative Pedagogy: Improving Early Childhood Education in Fragile Contexts (UKRI GCRF) on how children in communities in Brazil, Eswatini, South Africa, and Scotland have experienced the effects of the pandemic. This article benefits from having co-authors from various countries, bringing their own located knowledge to considerations of children's rights and early childhood education in the wake of the pandemic. The authors discuss different perspectives on children's human rights within historical, social, and cultural contexts and, by doing so, will discuss how the global pandemic has placed a spotlight on the previous inequalities within early years education and how the disparity of those with capital (economic and social) have led to an even greater disproportion of children needing health and educational support.

4.
The Australian Journal of Music Therapy ; 32(1):42-51, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1710461

ABSTRACT

Families faced lost or reduced employment, increased food and housing insecurity, limited ability to support schooling from home due to parental capacity and lack of technology, reduced social support, and increases in levels of domestic violence (Hand et al., 2020). Sing&Grow has also been found to improve parent mental health, parenting behaviours and children's social and communication development (Nicholson et al., 2008;Nicholson et al., 2010;Williams et al., 2012). A shared spreadsheet outlined the weekly workflow for all staff in preparation for 'delivery' the following week, and included allocation of tasks, due dates, digital platforms for content upload, and communication pathways. Family safety was also supported by the addition of an emergency contact to the Sing&Grow's registration form, as well as safety procedures should a music therapist witness anything concerning in a family's home.

5.
J Clin Virol Plus ; 1(4): 100040, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1385877

ABSTRACT

Multiple SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations have shown excellent efficacy during clinical trials. However, post vaccine surveillance is important to confirm 'real-world' findings of vaccine efficacy and safety. It is therefore imperative to identify individuals that become infected with SARS-CoV-2 post vaccination. We investigated the vaccination status of staff that had tested positive in a cohort of healthcare workers in one large tertiary hospital in the UK. At the time of the investigation, 8th December 2020 to 13th March 2021, 11,871 staff had been vaccinated and 225 staff tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. This period coincided with the second wave of SARS-CoV-2 infections in the UK which was driven by the Alpha variant. No healthcare workers who were double vaccinated had a positive PCR test for SARS-CoV-2 during this study period confirming vaccination with Pfizer BioNTec BNT162b2 gives excellent protection against infection of this variant.

6.
J Hosp Infect ; 112: 45-48, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272536

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic generated renewed focus on infectious disease transmission in healthcare settings. This study aimed to evaluate staff perceptions towards influenza vaccination in the COVID-19 context. All healthcare workers within a major UK tertiary referral hospital were invited to answer a survey conducted from September 2nd to 13th, 2020. In all, 593 responses were received across a spectrum of roles; 44% reported they were more likely to get an influenza vaccine this year due to COVID-19; however, 10% felt that an influenza vaccine was less important due to social distancing. Additional questions evaluated intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination. There were substantial differences of opinion between staff groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/psychology , Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/standards , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Influenza, Human/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
7.
Nursing Older People ; 33(2):5, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1206448
8.
Advances in Science and Research ; 17:129-141, 2020.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1055210

ABSTRACT

Having a common framework for early action to cope with complex disasters can make it easier for authorities and other stakeholders, including populations at risk, to understand the full spectrum of secondary and tertiary effects and thus where to focus preparedness efforts, and how best to provide more targeted warnings and response services. Meteorological and hydrological services world-wide have developed and implemented Multi-Hazard Early Warning Systems (MHEWS) for weather and climate related hazards that are now being expanded and transitioned towards Multi-Hazard Impact-based Early Warning Systems (MHIEWS). While it is still early days it is becoming clear that there are useful lessons from this approach in the COVID-19 global pandemic, and some valuable insight to be gained in risk communication, risk analysis and monitoring methodologies and approaches. The ability to understand and respond effectively to warnings through appropriate behaviours and actions is central to resilient societies and communities. By avoiding physical, societal and economic harm to the greatest extent possible, recovery from a hazard is likely to be faster, less costly and more complete. MHIEWS can be a common approach for all hazards and therefore more likely to become a trusted tool that everyone can understand and use as a basic element of their national disaster risk management system. The interconnectedness of hazards and their impacts is a strong motivator for a common approach. One of the lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic and extreme weather events is the need to understand the vulnerability of individuals, communities and societies so as to provide reliable, targeted guidance and warnings and the willingness and capacity to prepare for a reasonable worst-case scenario based on informed long-term planning. Meteorology and hydrology are making good progress in this direction and the process can be readily applied to health and other sectors.

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