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1.
Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol ; 14: 779-814, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511884

ABSTRACT

Dermal filler treatments require constant reassessment for improving and safeguarding the rapidly evolving aesthetic field. Suboptimal injection technique, patient selection and product knowledge have touted a concerning increase in filler complications, with new challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic leading to new paradigms in the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of complications. The updated 10-point plan has been developed to curtail complications through consideration of causative factors, categorized as patient, product, and procedure-related. Patient-related factors include a preprocedural consultation with careful elucidation of skin conditions (acne, rosacea, dermatitis), systemic disease (allergies, autoimmune disease, underlying bacterial and viral disease (herpes simplex virus, COVID-19 infection), medications (antineoplastic drugs, recreational drugs) and previous cosmetic procedures (including fillers and energy-based devices). Patient assessment should include standardized photography and also evaluate the role of social media, ethnicity, gender, generational, and LGBTQ+ needs. Specified informed consent for both adverse events and their treatment is essential due to the increase in vascular complications, including the risk of blindness. Product-related factors include the powerful advantage of reversibility when using hyaluronic acid (HA) products. Product characteristics such as molecular weight and filler degradation should be understood. Product layering over late or minimally degradable fillers is still inadvisable due to the initial filler being teased into reactivity. Procedural factors such as consistent photographic documentation, procedural planning, aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT), knowledge of topographical anatomy and angiosomes, and technical dexterity including pinch anatomy and needle skills are of pivotal importance. The final section is dedicated to algorithms and checklists for managing and treating complications such as allergic hypersensitivity reactions, vascular events, infection, edema and late-onset adverse events (LOAEs). The updated 10-point plan is a methodical strategy aimed at further minimising the risk of dermal filler complications.

2.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 96: 107777, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225264

ABSTRACT

An increasing amount of reports in the literature is showing that medical ozone (O3) is used, with encouraging results, in treating COVID-19 patients, optimizing pain and symptoms relief, respiratory parameters, inflammatory and coagulation markers and the overall health status, so reducing significantly how much time patients underwent hospitalization and intensive care. To date, aside from mechanisms taking into account the ability of O3 to activate a rapid oxidative stress response, by up-regulating antioxidant and scavenging enzymes, no sound hypothesis was addressed to attempt a synopsis of how O3 should act on COVID-19. The knowledge on how O3 works on inflammation and thrombosis mechanisms is of the utmost importance to make physicians endowed with new guns against SARS-CoV2 pandemic. This review tries to address this issue, so to expand the debate in the scientific community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Oxidants, Photochemical/pharmacology , Ozone/pharmacology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Humans , Oxidative Stress/drug effects
4.
Int J Surg Case Rep ; 80: 105619, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085542

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Facial trauma are an important cause of serious ocular morbidity. In particular domestic trauma are a small part of total. COVID-19 pandemic has been influencing our life in a way never seen before, people need to remain at home due to lockdown restrictions. In this scenario we are seeing an increase in the percentage of domestic facial trauma. In other hand pandemic has influenced the possibility of hospitalization, so daily based procedures increased their importance in global treatment planning. CASE PRESENTATION: A 58 yo man presented to our ward with a foreign body in left eyebrow. Trauma happened during gardening. CLINICAL DISCUSSION: The importance of imaging to perform the right procedure has become more important during pandemic to reduce time of hospitalization. CONCLUSION: CT scan and ophtalmology consult have been the guideline to avoid a more invasive treatment which was performed in an outpatient regimen with local anesthesia.

7.
Int Immunopharmacol ; 88: 106879, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919641

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the potential efficacy of a novel approach to treat COVID-19 patients, using an oxygen-ozone (O2-O3) mixture, via a process called Oxygen-Ozone- Immunoceutical Therapy. The methodology met the criteria of a novel, promising approach to treat successfully elderly COVID-19 patients, particularly when hospitalized in intensive care units (ICUs) Experimental design: We investigated the therapeutic effect of 4 cycles of O2-O3 in 50 hospitalized COVID-19 subjects suffering from acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS), aged more than 60 years, all males and undergoing non invasive mechanical ventilation in ICUs. RESULTS: Following O2-O3 treatment a significant improvement in inflammation and oxygenation indexes occurred rapidly and within the first 9 days after the treatment, despite the expected 14-20 days. A significant reduction of inflammatory and thromboembolic markers (CRP, IL-6, D-dimer) was observed. Furthermore, amelioration in the major respiratory indexes, such as respiratory and gas exchange markers (SatO2%, PaO2/FiO2 ratio), was reported. CONCLUSION: Our results show that O2-O3 treatment would be a promising therapy for COVID-19 patients. It leads patients to a fast recovery from ARDS via the improvement of major respiratory indexes and blood gas parameters, following a relatively short time of dispensed forced ventilation (about one to two weeks). This study may encourage the scientific community to further investigate and evaluate the proposed method for the treatment of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Immunotherapy/methods , Oxygen/therapeutic use , Ozone/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Blood Gas Analysis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Humans , Immunotherapy/instrumentation , Infusions, Intravenous , Intensive Care Units , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Ozone/administration & dosage , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/immunology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Clin Exp Dent Res ; 7(1): 101-108, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813309

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this narrative review was to collect all findings from literature about oral signs and symptoms of COVID-19, in order to draw a picture of oral involvement of this challenging viral infection, to help oral professionals in a better triage and early diagnosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The search for international literature was made including articles written in English and reporting about oral manifestations in patients with a diagnosis of COVID-19. The publication time was limited to 2019 and 2020, up to May 20, 2020. A narrative review was performed. RESULTS: Twenty-three articles were included in this review. Three different oral manifestations were found: taste alteration, oral blister and ulcers, and oral lesions associated with Kawasaki-like diseases (erythema, bleeding of lips, "strawberry tongue"). The higher expression of Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in the oral cavity and in endothelial cells might be responsible for oral manifestation and the major report of signs and symptoms in the occidental countries. CONCLUSIONS: Detecting oral signs and symptoms of COVID-19 could be useful to perform a better preliminary triage in dental setting, and in recognizing possible early manifestations of the disease. However, considering the outbreak of COVID-19 and the consequent difficulty of undergoing oral examinations, the oral manifestations might be misdiagnosed; then, we would encourage oral professionals to perform other studies about this topic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mouth Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Mouth Diseases/epidemiology , Mouth Diseases/pathology , Prognosis
9.
J Cosmet Dermatol ; 19(8): 1829-1837, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-644018

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is expected to last for an extended time, making strict safety precautions for office procedures unavoidable. The lockdown is going to be lifted in many areas, and strict guidelines detailing the infection control measures for aesthetic clinics are going to be of particular importance. METHODS: A virtual meeting was conducted with the members (n = 12) of the European Academy of Facial Plastic Surgery Focus Group to outline the safety protocol for the nonsurgical facial aesthetic procedures for aesthetic practices in order to protect the clinic staff and the patients from SARS-CoV-2 infection. The data analysis was undertaken by thematic and iterative approach. RESULTS: Consensus guidelines for nonsurgical facial aesthetic procedures based on current knowledge are provided for three levels: precautions before visiting the clinic, precautions during the clinic visit, and precautions after the clinic visit. CONCLUSIONS: Sound infection control measures are mandatory for nonsurgical aesthetic practices all around the world. These may vary from country to country, but this logical approach can be customized according to the respective country laws and guidelines.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cosmetic Techniques/standards , Dermatology/standards , Infection Control/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Esthetics , Face , Female , Focus Groups , Health Personnel/standards , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Rejuvenation , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Facial Plast Surg Aesthet Med ; 22(4): 233-237, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-260116

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in widespread disruption to routine surgical services across the globe. As the peak of the initial pandemic passes, surgeons will increasingly resume elective work to address the backlog. Whilst urgent cases such as cancer work will be prioritized, the safe resumption of facial plastic surgery will remain an ongoing challenge; particularly if there are secondary waves of infection. Rhinoplasty and nasal reconstructive surgery in particular poses a unique challenge to address due to the due to the potential for aerosolizing the virus. A task force of facial plastic surgeons from the European Academy of Facial Plastic Surgery has collaborated to create this document detailing recommendations for resuming a safe facial plastic surgery practice. These include the need to embrace telemedicine, advice on surgical prioritization, planning of clinical area flow plans, advice on pre-/peri- and postoperative care as well as recommendations on training for residents and well-being for surgeons. The recommendations have been made in line with the best available evidence in the literature and are applicable to facial plastic surgery colleagues from around the world in order to resume a safe practice.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Elective Surgical Procedures/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Perioperative Care/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Elective Surgical Procedures/methods , Europe , Humans , Perioperative Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , SARS-CoV-2
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