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1.
Immunity ; 55(3): 382-384, 2022 03 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1747889

ABSTRACT

Macrophage activation is essential for effective immunity to infection but can also contribute to disease through incompletely understood mechanisms. In this issue of Immunity, Simpson et al. reveal that death of activated macrophages integrates extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis that contribute to damaging host responses.


Subject(s)
Interferon-gamma , Macrophage Activation , Apoptosis , Caspase 8/metabolism , Cell Death , Interferon-gamma/metabolism , Ligands , Macrophages/immunology
2.
Life Sci Alliance ; 5(4)2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1637974

ABSTRACT

Advanced age is a key predictor of severe COVID-19. To gain insight into this relationship, we used the rhesus macaque model of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Eight older and eight younger macaques were inoculated with SARS-CoV-2. Animals were evaluated using viral RNA quantification, clinical observations, thoracic radiographs, single-cell transcriptomics, multiparameter flow cytometry, multiplex immunohistochemistry, cytokine detection, and lipidomics analysis at predefined time points in various tissues. Differences in clinical signs, pulmonary infiltrates, and virus replication were limited. Transcriptional signatures of inflammation-associated genes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid at 3 dpi revealed efficient mounting of innate immune defenses in both cohorts. However, age-specific divergence of immune responses emerged during the post-acute phase. Older animals exhibited sustained local inflammatory innate responses, whereas local effector T-cell responses were induced earlier in the younger animals. Circulating lipid mediator and cytokine levels highlighted increased repair-associated signals in the younger animals, and persistent pro-inflammatory responses in the older animals. In summary, despite similar disease outcomes, multi-omics profiling suggests that age may delay or impair antiviral cellular immune responses and delay efficient return to immune homeostasis.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/veterinary , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Acute Disease , Animals , Antibody Formation/immunology , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/genetics , Cytokines/blood , Gene Expression Regulation , Gene Regulatory Networks , Genomics , Immunity, Cellular/genetics , Immunomodulation , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/pathology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Lymphoid Tissue/pathology , Macaca mulatta/immunology , Macaca mulatta/virology , Models, Biological , Single-Cell Analysis , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Transcription, Genetic
3.
J Exp Med ; 219(2)2022 02 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1565893

ABSTRACT

In addition to providing partial protection against pediatric tuberculosis, vaccination with bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been reported to confer nonspecific resistance to unrelated pulmonary pathogens, a phenomenon attributed to the induction of long-lasting alterations within the myeloid cell compartment. Here, we demonstrate that intravenous, but not subcutaneous, inoculation of BCG protects human-ACE2 transgenic mice against lethal challenge with SARS-CoV-2 (SCV2) and results in reduced viral loads in non-transgenic animals infected with an α variant. The observed increase in host resistance was associated with reductions in SCV2-induced tissue pathology, inflammatory cell recruitment, and cytokine production that multivariate analysis revealed as only partially related to diminished viral load. We propose that this protection stems from BCG-induced alterations in the composition and function of the pulmonary cellular compartment that impact the innate response to the virus and ensuing immunopathology. While intravenous BCG vaccination is not a clinically acceptable practice, our findings provide an experimental model for identifying mechanisms by which nonspecific stimulation of the pulmonary immune response promotes host resistance to SCV2 lethality.


Subject(s)
BCG Vaccine/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Administration, Intravenous , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Animals , Chemokines/metabolism , Humans , Inflammation/pathology , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Mice, Transgenic , Viral Load
4.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(50)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560743

ABSTRACT

Single-dose vaccines with the ability to restrict SARS-CoV-2 replication in the respiratory tract are needed for all age groups, aiding efforts toward control of COVID-19. We developed a live intranasal vector vaccine for infants and children against COVID-19 based on replication-competent chimeric bovine/human parainfluenza virus type 3 (B/HPIV3) that express the native (S) or prefusion-stabilized (S-2P) SARS-CoV-2 S spike protein, the major protective and neutralization antigen of SARS-CoV-2. B/HPIV3/S and B/HPIV3/S-2P replicated as efficiently as B/HPIV3 in vitro and stably expressed SARS-CoV-2 S. Prefusion stabilization increased S expression by B/HPIV3 in vitro. In hamsters, a single intranasal dose of B/HPIV3/S-2P induced significantly higher titers compared to B/HPIV3/S of serum SARS-CoV-2-neutralizing antibodies (12-fold higher), serum IgA and IgG to SARS-CoV-2 S protein (5-fold and 13-fold), and IgG to the receptor binding domain (10-fold). Antibodies exhibited broad neutralizing activity against SARS-CoV-2 of lineages A, B.1.1.7, and B.1.351. Four weeks after immunization, hamsters were challenged intranasally with 104.5 50% tissue-culture infectious-dose (TCID50) of SARS-CoV-2. In B/HPIV3 empty vector-immunized hamsters, SARS-CoV-2 replicated to mean titers of 106.6 TCID50/g in lungs and 107 TCID50/g in nasal tissues and induced moderate weight loss. In B/HPIV3/S-immunized hamsters, SARS-CoV-2 challenge virus was reduced 20-fold in nasal tissues and undetectable in lungs. In B/HPIV3/S-2P-immunized hamsters, infectious challenge virus was undetectable in nasal tissues and lungs; B/HPIV3/S and B/HPIV3/S-2P completely protected against weight loss after SARS-CoV-2 challenge. B/HPIV3/S-2P is a promising vaccine candidate to protect infants and young children against HPIV3 and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Administration, Intranasal , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/genetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cricetinae , Genetic Vectors , Immunization , Parainfluenza Virus 3, Bovine/genetics , Parainfluenza Virus 3, Human/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Attenuated/genetics , Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology
5.
[Unspecified Source]; 2020.
Preprint in English | [Unspecified Source] | ID: ppcovidwho-292809

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019 and resulted in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Several animal models have been rapidly developed that recapitulate the asymptomatic to moderate disease spectrum. Now, there is a direct need for additional small animal models to study the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 and for fast-tracked medical countermeasure development. Here, we show that transgenic mice expressing the human SARS-CoV-2 receptor (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [hACE2]) under a cytokeratin 18 promoter (K18) are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and that infection resulted in a dose-dependent lethal disease course. After inoculation with either 10 (4) TCID (50) or 10 (5) TCID (50) , the SARS-CoV-2 infection resulted in rapid weight loss in both groups and uniform lethality in the 10 (5) TCID (50) group. High levels of viral RNA shedding were observed from the upper and lower respiratory tract and intermittent shedding was observed from the intestinal tract. Inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 resulted in upper and lower respiratory tract infection with high infectious virus titers in nasal turbinates, trachea and lungs. The observed interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary pathology, with SARS-CoV-2 replication evident in pneumocytes, were similar to that reported in severe cases of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 infection resulted in macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration in the lungs and upregulation of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Extrapulmonary replication of SARS-CoV-2 was observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of several animals at 7 DPI but not at 3 DPI. The rapid inflammatory response and observed pathology bears resemblance to COVID-19. Taken together, this suggests that this mouse model can be useful for studies of pathogenesis and medical countermeasure development. AUTHORS SUMMARY: The disease manifestation of COVID-19 in humans range from asymptomatic to severe. While several mild to moderate disease models have been developed, there is still a need for animal models that recapitulate the severe and fatal progression observed in a subset of patients. Here, we show that humanized transgenic mice developed dose-dependent disease when inoculated with SARS-CoV-2, the etiological agent of COVID-19. The mice developed upper and lower respiratory tract infection, with virus replication also in the brain after day 3 post inoculation. The pathological and immunological diseases manifestation observed in these mice bears resemblance to human COVID-19, suggesting increased usefulness of this model for elucidating COVID-19 pathogenesis further and testing of countermeasures, both of which are urgently needed.

6.
J Virol ; 95(24): e0059621, 2021 11 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443352

ABSTRACT

Cellular factors have important roles in all facets of the flavivirus replication cycle. Deciphering viral-host protein interactions is essential for understanding the flavivirus life cycle as well as development of effective antiviral strategies. To uncover novel host factors that are co-opted by multiple flaviviruses, a CRISPR/Cas9 genome wide knockout (KO) screen was employed to identify genes required for replication of Zika virus (ZIKV). Receptor for Activated Protein C Kinase 1 (RACK1) was identified as a novel host factor required for ZIKV replication, which was confirmed via complementary experiments. Depletion of RACK1 via siRNA demonstrated that RACK1 is important for replication of a wide range of mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses, including West Nile Virus (WNV), Dengue Virus (DENV), Powassan Virus (POWV) and Langat Virus (LGTV) as well as the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, but not for YFV, EBOV, VSV or HSV. Notably, flavivirus replication was only abrogated when RACK1 expression was dampened prior to infection. Utilising a non-replicative flavivirus model, we show altered morphology of viral replication factories and reduced formation of vesicle packets (VPs) in cells lacking RACK1 expression. In addition, RACK1 interacted with NS1 protein from multiple flaviviruses; a key protein for replication complex formation. Overall, these findings reveal RACK1's crucial role to the biogenesis of pan-flavivirus replication organelles. IMPORTANCE Cellular factors are critical in all facets of viral lifecycles, where overlapping interactions between the virus and host can be exploited as possible avenues for the development of antiviral therapeutics. Using a genome-wide CRISPR knockout screening approach to identify novel cellular factors important for flavivirus replication we identified RACK1 as a pro-viral host factor for both mosquito- and tick-borne flaviviruses in addition to SARS-CoV-2. Using an innovative flavivirus protein expression system, we demonstrate for the first time the impact of the loss of RACK1 on the formation of viral replication factories known as 'vesicle packets' (VPs). In addition, we show that RACK1 can interact with numerous flavivirus NS1 proteins as a potential mechanism by which VP formation can be induced by the former.


Subject(s)
CRISPR-Cas Systems , Flavivirus/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Receptors for Activated C Kinase/genetics , Virus Replication , A549 Cells , Aedes , Animals , COVID-19 , Chlorocebus aethiops , Culicidae , Dengue Virus/genetics , Genome-Wide Association Study , HEK293 Cells , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , RNA, Small Interfering/metabolism , RNA, Viral/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Vero Cells , West Nile virus/genetics , Zika Virus/genetics , Zika Virus Infection/virology
7.
Viruses ; 13(9)2021 09 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411084

ABSTRACT

A variety of immunolabeling procedures for both light and electron microscopy were used to examine the cellular origins of the host membranes supporting the SARS-CoV-2 replication complex. The endoplasmic reticulum has long been implicated as a source of membrane for the coronavirus replication organelle. Using dsRNA as a marker for sites of viral RNA synthesis, we provide additional evidence supporting ER as a prominent source of membrane. In addition, we observed a rapid fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus which is visible by 6 h and complete by 12 h post-infection. Golgi derived lipid appears to be incorporated into the replication organelle although protein markers are dispersed throughout the infected cell. The mechanism of Golgi disruption is undefined, but chemical disruption of the Golgi apparatus by brefeldin A is inhibitory to viral replication. A search for an individual SARS-CoV-2 protein responsible for this activity identified at least five viral proteins, M, S, E, Orf6, and nsp3, that induced Golgi fragmentation when expressed in eukaryotic cells. Each of these proteins, as well as nsp4, also caused visible changes to ER structure as shown by correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM). Collectively, these results imply that specific disruption of the Golgi apparatus is a critical component of coronavirus replication.


Subject(s)
Endoplasmic Reticulum/virology , Golgi Apparatus/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Replication , Animals , Chlorocebus aethiops , Coronavirus M Proteins/physiology , Coronavirus M Proteins/ultrastructure , Endoplasmic Reticulum/ultrastructure , Golgi Apparatus/ultrastructure , Humans , Intracellular Membranes/ultrastructure , Intracellular Membranes/virology , Microscopy, Electron , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Vero Cells , Viral Structural Proteins/physiology , Viral Structural Proteins/ultrastructure
8.
Transfusion ; 61(8): 2384-2391, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247294

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV-2 RNA prevalence in blood donors from large geographic areas of high community transmission is limited. We tested residual donor plasma minipools (MPs) to determine SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia prevalence in six United States areas. STUDY DESIGN/METHODS: Blood donations collected from 7 March 2020 to 25 September 2020 were tested for SARS-CoV-2 RNA (vRNA) in MP of 6 or 16 donations using the Grifols Procleix SARS-CoV-2 research-use only (RUO) transcription-mediated amplification (TMA) assay. Reactive results were confirmed using an alternate target region TMA assay. Reactive MPs were tested by TMA after serial dilution to estimate viral load. Testing for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and infectivity was performed. RESULTS: A total of 17,995 MPs corresponding to approximately 258,000 donations were tested for vRNA. Three confirmed reactive MP16 were identified. The estimated prevalence of vRNA reactive donations was 1.16/100,000 (95% CI 0.40, 3.42). The vRNA-reactive samples were non-reactive for antibody, and the estimated viral loads of the (presumed single) positive donations within each MP ranged from <1000 to <4000 copies/ml. When tested, no infectivity was observed in inoculated permissive cell cultures. DISCUSSION: Blood donation MP-nucleic acid testing (NAT) indicated that SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia is infrequent and, when detected, the vRNA was at low concentrations. Only one RNA-reactive MP could be tested for infectivity for operational reasons and was not infectious in cell culture. These findings support current recommendations from international and national regulatory agencies to not screen donors by NAT.


Subject(s)
Blood Donors , Blood Safety , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Humans , United States
9.
PLoS Pathog ; 17(1): e1009195, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1034958

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 emerged in late 2019 and resulted in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Several animal models have been rapidly developed that recapitulate the asymptomatic to moderate disease spectrum. Now, there is a direct need for additional small animal models to study the pathogenesis of severe COVID-19 and for fast-tracked medical countermeasure development. Here, we show that transgenic mice expressing the human SARS-CoV-2 receptor (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 [hACE2]) under a cytokeratin 18 promoter (K18) are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and that infection resulted in a dose-dependent lethal disease course. After inoculation with either 104 TCID50 or 105 TCID50, the SARS-CoV-2 infection resulted in rapid weight loss in both groups and uniform lethality in the 105 TCID50 group. High levels of viral RNA shedding were observed from the upper and lower respiratory tract and intermittent shedding was observed from the intestinal tract. Inoculation with SARS-CoV-2 resulted in upper and lower respiratory tract infection with high infectious virus titers in nasal turbinates, trachea and lungs. The observed interstitial pneumonia and pulmonary pathology, with SARS-CoV-2 replication evident in pneumocytes, were similar to that reported in severe cases of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 infection resulted in macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration in the lungs and upregulation of Th1 and proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Extrapulmonary replication of SARS-CoV-2 was observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of several animals at 7 DPI but not at 3 DPI. The rapid inflammatory response and observed pathology bears resemblance to COVID-19. Additionally, we demonstrate that a mild disease course can be simulated by low dose infection with 102 TCID50 SARS-CoV-2, resulting in minimal clinical manifestation and near uniform survival. Taken together, these data support future application of this model to studies of pathogenesis and medical countermeasure development.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , Keratin-18/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Humans , Keratin-18/immunology , Lung/immunology , Lung/pathology , Lymphocytes/immunology , Macrophages/immunology , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Promoter Regions, Genetic , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Trachea/immunology , Trachea/virology
10.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(578)2021 01 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024212

ABSTRACT

Detailed knowledge about the dynamics of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is important for uncovering the viral and host factors that contribute to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pathogenesis. Old-World nonhuman primates recapitulate mild to moderate cases of COVID-19, thereby serving as important pathogenesis models. We compared African green monkeys inoculated with infectious SARS-CoV-2 or irradiated, inactivated virus to study the dynamics of virus replication throughout the respiratory tract. Genomic RNA from the animals inoculated with the irradiated virus was found to be highly stable, whereas subgenomic RNA, an indicator of viral replication, was found to degrade quickly. We combined this information with single-cell RNA sequencing of cells isolated from the lung and lung-draining mediastinal lymph nodes and developed new analysis methods for unbiased targeting of important cells in the host response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Through detection of reads to the viral genome, we were able to determine that replication of the virus in the lungs appeared to occur mainly in pneumocytes, whereas macrophages drove the inflammatory response. Monocyte-derived macrophages recruited to the lungs, rather than tissue-resident alveolar macrophages, were most likely to be responsible for phagocytosis of infected cells and cellular debris early in infection, with their roles switching during clearance of infection. Together, our dataset provides a detailed view of the dynamics of virus replication and host responses over the course of mild COVID-19 and serves as a valuable resource to identify therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sequence Analysis, RNA , Single-Cell Analysis , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/pathology , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/virology , Animals , Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/virology , COVID-19/genetics , Chlorocebus aethiops , DNA, Viral/genetics , Female , Genome, Viral/genetics , Inflammation/pathology , Lung/pathology , Lymph Nodes/pathology , Macrophages/pathology , Macrophages/virology , Male , Mediastinum/pathology , Transcription, Genetic , Viral Load , Virus Replication
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