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2.
Journal of Stroke Medicine ; 5(1):48-55, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1910250

ABSTRACT

Background and objective Amongst the varied neurological manifestations of COVID-19 infection, stroke is one of the common complications. A large portion of patients had large vessel occlusion (LVO) which increases the risk of malignant cerebral infarction requiring decompressive craniectomy. The impact of COVID-19, however, on decompressive craniectomy is not well described. Through this study, we aim to study the impact of decompressive craniectomy in COVID-19 patients presented to our tertiary care hospital. Material and methods Data of all acute ischemic stroke patients who tested COVID positive during the study period was collected. From among them, patients requiring decompressive craniectomy were included. The demographic, clinico-radiological parameters related to stroke, treatment received, outcome and complications were noted. In addition, data from all case reports and case series published on patients with COVID-19, who had developed ischemic stroke and underwent decompression craniectomy was collected and systematically reviewed. Results Twenty-seven stroke patients tested positive for COVID-19 infection, out of whom five patients underwent decompression hemicraniectomy in view of neurologic deterioration. The review of literature yielded 453 s. After reading the full text of 69 articles, 12 studies on 15 patients finally met our inclusion criteria and were included in the systematic review. The mortality rate was 40% among stroke patients requiring decompressive craniectomy in COVID-19 patients. The mortality rate and functional outcomes of this cohort are comparable to the pre-pandemic period. Conclusion Decompressive craniectomy is a life-saving procedure in COVID-19 patients with malignant infarctions similar to patients in the pre-COVID-19 era.

3.
Telemed Rep ; 2(1): 88-96, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1901063

ABSTRACT

Background: Teleneurology consultations can be highly advantageous since neurological diseases and disabilities often limit patient's access to health care, particularly in a setting where they need to travel long distances for specialty consults. Patient satisfaction is an important outcome assessing success of a telemedicine program. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine satisfaction and perception of patients toward an audio call based teleneurology follow-up initiated during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Primary outcomes were satisfaction to tele-consult, and proportion of patients preferring telemedicine for future follow-up. Results: A total of 261 patients who received tele-consult were enrolled. Satisfaction was highest for domain technological quality, followed by patient-physician dialogue (PPD) and least to quality of care (QoC). Median (interquartile range) patient satisfaction on a 5-point Likert scale was 4 (3-5). Eighty-five (32.6%; 95% confidence interval 26.9-38.6%) patients preferred telemedicine for future follow-up. Higher overall satisfaction was associated with health condition being stable/better, change in treatment advised on tele-consult, diagnosis not requiring follow-up examination, higher scores on domains QoC and PPD (p < 0.05). Future preference for telemedicine was associated with patient him-/herself consulting with doctor, less duration of follow-up, higher overall satisfaction, and higher scores on domain QoC (p < 0.05). On thematic analysis, telemedicine was found convenient, reduced expenditure, and had better physician attention; in-person visits were comprehensive, had better patient-physician relationship, and better communication. Discussion: Patient satisfaction was lower in our study than what has been observed earlier, which may be explained by the primitive nature of our platform. Several variables related to the patients' disease process have an effect on patient satisfaction. Conclusion: Development of robust, structured platforms is necessary to fully utilize the potential of telemedicine in developing countries.

4.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 25(2): 218-223, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879551

ABSTRACT

Objective: Neurological emergencies saw a paradigm shift in approach during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic with the challenge to manage patients with and without COVID-19. We aimed to compare the various neurological disorders and 3 months outcome in patients with and without SARS-CoV-2 infection. Methods: In an ambispective cohort study design, we enrolled patients with and without SARS CoV-2 infection coming to a medical emergency with neurological disorders between April 2020 and September 2020. Demographic, clinical, biochemical, and treatment details of these patients were collected and compared. Their outcomes, both in-hospital and at 3 months were assessed by the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Results: Two thirty-five patients (235) were enrolled from emergency services with neurological disorders. Of them, 81 (34.5%) were COVID-19 positive. The mean (SD) age was 49.5 (17.3) years, and the majority of the patients were male (63.0%). The commonest neurological diagnosis was acute ischemic stroke (AIS) (43.0%). The in-hospital mortality was higher in the patients who were COVID-19 positive (COVID-19 positive: 29 (35.8%) versus COVID-19 negative: 12 (7.8%), P value: <0.001). The 3 months telephonic follow-up could be completed in 73.2% of the patients (142/194). Four (12.1%) deaths occurred on follow-up in the COVID-19 positive versus fifteen (13.8%) in the COVID-19 negative patients (P value: 1.00). The 3-month mRS was worse in the COVID-19 positive group (P value <0.001). However, this was driven by higher in-hospital morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 positive patients. Conclusion: Patients with neurological disorders presenting with COVID-19 infection had worse outcomes, including in-hospital and 3 months disability.

5.
Diversity and Equality in Health and Care ; 18(2), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1863728

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 has been emerged from Wuhan in China and has now shacked out more than 200 Countries and territories all over the world. World’s best scientists are contributing and endeavouring to find drugs, immuno-modulators and vaccines for the treatment of COVID-19. SARS-CoV-2 virus is a betacoronavirus and positive-stranded RNA virus that originates from the Coronaviridae family. The most important structural proteins of SARS-CoV-2 are spike trimeric (S) protein, membrane (M) protein, envelop (E) protein and the nucleocapsid (N) protein. The SARS-CoV-2 begins its life cycle, when the S protein binds with the host cells receptor ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2). The viral protein(M) and genome (Protein-N) RNA eventually get assembled into virions (with Protein-S and HE), Endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. According to the various research reports, there aremore than 50 drugs, immunomodulators and vaccines that may be effective against COVID-19. Some drugs had shown the in vitro activity against MN1 -https://media.proquest.com/media/hms/PFT/1/Dn72N?_a=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%3D%3D&_s=zUuGTksgyVFKqrcRhToSnSU0YCM%3D ERS-CoV, SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2. The aim of this review is to highlight the properties,structure, life cycle of SARS-CoV-2 and description of the agents which show potential efficacy against SARS-CoV-2.

6.
Journal of Stroke Medicine ; : 25166085221085780, 2022.
Article in English | Sage | ID: covidwho-1794036

ABSTRACT

Patients with severe COVID-19 are at risk of thrombotic complications such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary thromboembolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke. The incidence of strokes following COVID-19 is reported to be around 1.2%. There has been increased incidence with COVID-19 of large vessel strokes, especially in young patients without any known vascular risk factors. We reported four patients with severe COVID-19-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome where stroke was diagnosed following neuroimaging. All the patients were on ventilatory assistance and supportive treatment when stroke was diagnosed. They had received sedation and paralytics during mechanical ventilation. Poor response to stimulation and nonresponsiveness after wearing off sedation prompted neuroimaging in these patients, which revealed stroke. Incidentally, all these patients had hypernatremia when stroke was diagnosed. This case series suggests that stroke should be considered a possible cause in all COVID-19 patients presenting with abnormal or altered sensorium.

7.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 25(1): 76-81, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726289

ABSTRACT

Background: Governments have imposed lockdowns in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Hospitals have restricted outpatient clinics and elective services meant for non-COVID illnesses. This has led to patients facing unprecedented challenges and uncertainties. This study was carried out to assess patients' concerns and apprehensions about the effect of the lockdown on their treatments. Materials and Methods: An ambispective, observational cross-sectional single centre study was conducted. Patients were contacted telephonically and requested to answer a structured questionnaire. Their responses were documented and summarized as frequency and proportions. Results: A total of 727 patients were interviewed. Epilepsy (32%) was the most common neurological illness in our cohort followed by stroke (18%). About half the patients and/or their caregivers reported health-related concerns during the lockdown. The primary concern was how to connect with their treating neurologist if need arose. Forty-seven patients (6.4%) had drug default. Among patients on immunomodulatory treatments, only eight patients had drug default. High compliance rates were also observed in the stroke and epilepsy cohorts. Of the 71 patients who required emergency care during the lockdown, 24 could reach our hospital emergency. Fourteen patients either had a delay or could not seek emergency care. Two-thirds of our patients found the telemedicine experience satisfactory. Conclusion: The ongoing pandemic will continue to pose challenges to both physicians and patients. Patients in follow-up may need to be contacted regularly and counselled regarding the importance of maintaining drug compliance. Telemedicine can be used to strengthen the healthcare delivery to patients with non-COVID illnesses.

8.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 25(1): 60-67, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726286

ABSTRACT

Objective: To study impact of COVID-19 pandemic on frequency, clinical/electrophysiological profile and treatment outcomes in pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Background: GBS is the most frequent cause of pediatric acute flaccid paralysis. The effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on pediatric GBS is unclear in the literature. Methods: We conducted an ambispective, multicentric, cohort study involving 12 of 27 centres in GBS Consortium, during two periods: pre-COVID-19 (March-August 2019) and during COVID-19 (March-August 2020). Children ≤12 years who satisfied National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke criteria for GBS/variants were enrolled. Details pertaining to clinical/laboratory parameters, treatment and outcomes (modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at discharge, GBS Disability score at discharge and 3 months) were analysed. Results: We enrolled 33 children in 2019 and 10 in 2020. Children in 2020 were older (median 10.4 [interquartile range 6.75-11.25] years versus 5 (2.5-8.4) years; P = 0.022) and had more sensory symptoms (50% versus 18.2%; P = 0.043). The 2020 group had relatively favourable mRS at discharge (median 1 (1-3.5) versus 3 (2-4); P = 0.042) and GBS disability score at 3 months (median 0 (0-0.75) versus 2 (0-3); P = 0.009) compared to 2019. Multivariate analysis revealed bowel involvement (P = 0.000) and ventilatory support (P = 0.001) as independent predictors of disability. No child in 2020 had preceding/concurrent SARS-CoV2 infection. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic led to a marked decline in pediatric GBS presenting to hospitals. Antecedent illnesses, clinical and electrophysiological profile of GBS remained largely unchanged from the pre-pandemic era.

9.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 24(5): 668-685, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566723

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Occurrence of stroke has been reported among patients with COVID-19. The present study compares clinical features and outcomes of stroke patients with and without COVID-19. METHODS: The COVID-19 Stroke Study Group (CSSG) is a multicentric study in 18 sites across India to observe and compare the clinical characteristics of patients with stroke admitted during the current pandemic period and a similar epoch in 2019. The present study reports patients of stroke with and without COVID-19 (CoVS and non-CoVS, respectively) seen between February 2020 and July 2020. Demographic, clinical, treatment, and outcome details of patients were collected. RESULTS: The mean age and gender were comparable between the two groups. CoVS patients had higher stroke severity and extent of cerebral involvement on imaging. In-hospital complications and death were higher among CoVS patients (53.06% vs. 17.51%; P < 0.001) and (42.31% vs. 7.6%; P < 0.001), respectively. At 3 months, higher mortality was observed among CoVS patients (67.65% vs. 13.43%; P < 0.001) and good outcome (modified Rankin score [mRS]: 0-2) was seen more often in non-CoVS patients (68.86% vs. 33.33%; P < 0.001). The presence of COVID-19 and baseline stroke severity were independent predictors of mortality. CONCLUSIONS: CoVS is associated with higher severity, poor outcome, and increased mortality. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and baseline stroke severity are independent predictors of mortality.

12.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 23(3): 261-264, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389615

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent respiratory infection including SARS-CoV-2 is an independent risk factor for acute cerebrovascular disease. PURPOSE: There have been reports linking haemorrhagic strokes to SARS-CoV-2 infection during this pandemic, which lead us to evaluate if SARS-CoV-2 infection could be associated with increased risk of intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). METHODS: A retrospective observational study evaluating all stroke cases admitted in our centre in the past one month. RESULTS: More than half (56%) had ICH, compared to 22% last year. Two patients with ICH were SARS-CoV-2 positive and they had no or mild respiratory symptoms and had higher occurrence of renal dysfunction. CONCLUSION: There could be possible association between ICH and SARS-CoV-2 infections. However, a prospective study with larger sample size is needed to elucidate the pathogenesis.

13.
J Neurol Sci ; 428: 117583, 2021 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313266

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the health systems around the world struggled to meet the challenges of COVID-19 pandemic, care of many non-COVID emergencies was affected. AIMS: The present study examined differences in the diagnosis, evaluation and management of stroke patients during a defined period in the ongoing pandemic in 2020 when compared to a similar epoch in year 2019. METHODS: The COVID stroke study group (CSSG) India, included 18 stroke centres spread across the country. Data was collected prospectively between February and July 2020 and retrospectively for the same period in 2019. Details of demographics, stroke evaluation, treatment, in-hospital and three months outcomes were collected and compared between these two time points. RESULTS: A total of 2549 patients were seen in both study periods; 1237 patients (48.53%) in 2019 and 1312 (51.47%) in 2020. Although the overall number of stroke patients and rates of thrombolysis were comparable, a significant decline was observed in the month of April 2020, during the initial period of the pandemic and lockdown. Endovascular treatment reduced significantly and longer door to needle and CT to needle times were observed in 2020. Although mortality was higher in 2020, proportion of patients with good outcome were similar in both the study periods. CONCLUSIONS: Although stroke admissions and rates of thrombolysis were comparable, some work flow metrics were delayed, endovascular stroke treatment rates declined and mortality was higher during the pandemic study period. Reorganization of stroke treatment pathways during the pandemic has likely improved the stroke care delivery across the globe.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , India/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment
14.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 24(1): 11-14, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150828

ABSTRACT

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has precipitated a global health crisis. Non-COVID diseases across specialties have been significantly compromised. The greatest challenge has been to continue providing care to non-COVID cases with minimum transmission risk to health care workers, patients, and caregivers. In this specter, better described as a medical holocaust, we present our experiences of dealing with acute neurological patients who could access our facility. We attempted to work on three key areas - initial screening using a more inclusive, dynamic checklist for COVID suspicion over and above the emergency triage, a mandatory initial holding on a separate floor of our inpatient service equipped with infection control strategies similar to a COVID-designated area, and daily screening of health care workers and caregivers for symptoms and possible exposures. It was a steep learning curve, a couple of close shaves, and many more lessons that went into the development of an algorithm that seems to be working well.

15.
Ann N Y Acad Sci ; 1473(1): 3-10, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1030196

ABSTRACT

Stroke care in India has evolved rapidly in the last decade with a focus on stroke awareness, prevention, rapid triage, treatment, and rehabilitation. But acute stroke care and poststroke rehabilitation in the country have limitations owing to the economic constraints and poor access to health care. The SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic has made stroke care even more challenging. We outline the unfavorable circumstances in stroke care induced by the pandemic; propose mitigating measures; crisis management; and provide a comparative evaluation of stroke care between India and the United States during the pandemic. There is a need for public health systems in both developed and developing countries to improve awareness, implement proper strategies of triage, acute treatment, well-defined rehabilitation plans, telemedicine services, and virtual check-ins.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Health Services Needs and Demand/trends , Humans , India/epidemiology , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/trends , United States/epidemiology
16.
J Stroke ; 22(3): 324-335, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-854517

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Various neurological findings including stroke in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been described, although no clarity exists regarding the nature and pattern of this association. This systematic review aims to report the characteristics of stroke in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: Three authors independently searched Web of Science, Embase, Scopus, and PubMed starting from inception up to May 22, 2020. The data for individual patients was extracted where available from published reports including clinical and laboratory parameters and analysed for any significant associations between variables. RESULTS: We identified 30 relevant articles involving 115 patients with acute or subacute stroke with COVID-19. The mean±standard deviation age was 62.5±14.5 years. Stroke was ischemic in majority of the patients (101 [87.8%]). Hypertension (42 [42%]), dyslipidaemia (24 [26.1%]), and diabetes (23 [23.2%]) were the major vascular risk factors. Most of the patients (80 [85.1%]) had COVID-19 symptoms at the time of stroke with a median interval of 10 days to stroke from the diagnosis of COVID-19. Three-fourths (86 [74.8%]) of the patients were critically ill which frequently delayed the diagnosis of stroke. High levels of D-dimer, and ferritin were observed in these patients. Patients with COVID-19 and stroke had a high mortality (47.9%). Factors associated with mortality were intensive care unit admission, having two or more vascular risk factors, particularly smoking and high levels of D-dimer, C-reactive protein, and lactate dehydrogenase. CONCLUSIONS: The association between stroke and COVID-19 is probably multifactorial including an amalgamation of traditional vascular risk factors, proinflammatory and a prothrombotic state. Prospectively collected data is required in the future to confirm this hypothesis.

17.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 23(3): 318-324, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623113

ABSTRACT

Stroke is a serious neurological comorbidity observed during the ongoing COVID-19 (coronavirus associated disease 2019) pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome, corona virus 2) and includes ischemic stroke, intracerebral haemorrhage and cerebral venous thrombosis. We reviewed factors that could potentially contribute to the occurrence of stroke among patients with COVID-19. There could be an interaction between the conventional risk factors of stroke, infection, systemic inflammatory response and plaque destabilisation. Inflammatory markers, D-dimer elevation and increased cytokine activity have been observed in patients with COVID-19. Other probable contributing factors include cardiac injury leading to embolism, a prothrombotic state and a possibility of direct neuroinvasive potential causing vasculopathy. Data from stroke patients gathered in large multicentric cohorts could help shed more light on the occurrence, behaviour, aetiology, pathophysiology, biomarkers and outcomes of stroke occurring during the ongoing pandemic.

18.
Open Public Health J. ; 1(13): 188-189, 2020.
Article in English | WHO COVID, ELSEVIER | ID: covidwho-589089
19.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 23(Suppl 1): S5-S14, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-316385

ABSTRACT

Knowledge related to SARS-CoV-2 or 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is still emerging and rapidly evolving. We know little about the effects of this novel coronavirus on various body systems and its behaviour among patients with underlying neurological conditions, especially those on immunomodulatory medications. The aim of the present consensus expert opinion document is to appraise the potential concerns when managing our patients with underlying CNS autoimmune demyelinating disorders during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Ann Indian Acad Neurol ; 23(Suppl 1): S15-S23, 2020 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-316384

ABSTRACT

The ongoing pandemic of COVID-19 is a global public health emergency. This has led to challenges for healthcare facilities to optimally manage other important medical emergencies. Stroke is an important public health emergency with significant mortality and morbidity. Timely treatment of acute stroke is critical to prevent disability. The current expert consensus statement on behalf of the Indian Stroke Association outlines the issues and suggestions related to the management of stroke during this ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

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